Review: Strategic Intelligence & Statecraft–Selected Essays (Brassey’s Intelligence and National Security Library)

5 Star, Diplomacy, Intelligence (Government/Secret), Intelligence (Public)

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5.0 out of 5 stars Strategic, Cultural Intelligence, Knowledge Policy,

April 7, 2000
Adda B. Bozeman
While reading this book, every intelligence professional should feel like a bashful second-grader shuffling their feet while being kindly reprimanded by their teacher. This book, a collection of essays from the 1980’s, is the only one I have ever found that truly grasps the strategic long-term importance of intelligence in the context of culture and general knowledge. The heart of the book is on page 177: “(There is a need) to recognize that just as the essence of knowledge is not as split up into academic disciplines as it is in our academic universe, so can intelligence not be set apart from statecraft and society, or subdivided into elements…such as analysis and estimates, counterintelligence, clandestine collection, covert action, and so forth. Rather, and as suggested earlier in this essay, intelligence is a scheme of things entire. And since it permeates thought and life throughout society, Western scholars must understand all aspects of a state’s culture before they can assess statecraft and intelligence.” The 25-page introduction, at least, should be read by every intelligence professional.
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