Journal: Haiti Assessment 29 Jan 10 AM

The earthquake ocurred on 12 January 2010–17 days ago.

As of today, as reported by Team Rubicon’s team leader in Haiti, there are still people on the outskirts or Port au Prince  who have not received medical attention (i.e. crushed bones and open wounds are now beyond gangrene, blood poisoning, and other infections).

Haiti victims’ medical needs shift away from trauma [erroneous for those who have not seen doctors at all and have no near-term prospects of doing so]

JACMEL, Haiti — When she arrived, the woman’s foot had been apparently crushed and gone untreated for almost two weeks. Maggots and flies covered her wound. Gangrene had set in.

“This is Vietnam — only we had better equipment then,” said Ted Alexander, a retired orthopedic surgeon who was a battalion surgeon during the war.

At this point in the relief effort, the need for emergency surgical care has declined significantly, said PAHO’s deputy director, physician Jon Andrus.

“We are seeing many fewer traumatic injuries, fractures, wounds and burns, and internal injuries,” he said in an e-mail.

However, there is a worrisome development. Cases of tetanus have been reported, as well as suspected cases of measles. An outbreak would be another major challenge to doctors here.

There are 43 hospitals and 12 field hospitals operating from Port-au-Prince to Jacmel, a coastal city southwest of the capital, the U.N. says. About 200,000 people have been injured; the latest estimates from the Haitian government say at least 111,500 are dead.

Phi Beta Iota: 200,000 injured divided by 55 medical units is 3,636 per unit.  Not even close to needed capabilities and most on thye outshirts of  Port au Prince still have not seen a single first responder.

Mobs disrupt some Haiti quake food handouts

PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) – Angry crowds mobbed three food distribution sites in Haiti’s capital on Thursday, the latest handouts to turn chaotic as aid groups struggle to help the throngs left desperate and hungry by the catastrophic earthquake.  At this point in the relief effort, the need for emergency surgical care has declined significantly, said PAHO’s deputy director, physician Jon Andrus.

“We are seeing many fewer traumatic injuries, fractures, wounds and burns, and internal injuries,” he said in an e-mail.  However, there is a worrisome development. Cases of tetanus have been reported, as well as suspected cases of measles. An outbreak would be another major challenge to doctors here.

Haiti quake survivors face mounting insecurity

PORT-AU-PRINCE (AFP) – Haiti’s quake survivors faced rising insecurity Friday with thousands of criminals on the loose and reports of rape and violence plaguing the weak and vulnerable.

Aid is still only trickling in despite a vast international relief effort launched after the January 12 disaster, and hundreds of thousands of homeless people are sheltering in tent camps short of food and medicines.

There are 43 hospitals and 12 field hospitals operating from Port-au-Prince to Jacmel, a coastal city southwest of the capital, the U.N. says.  [Phi Beta Iota: This boils down to 4,545 for each–our estimate is that only 40% at best of those needing care have been attended to]