Journal: In Search for Truth….Maybe Not

Civil Society, Cultural Intelligence, Ethics, Government, Media, Military
Story with Many Links

Pentagon’s Gitmo Recidivism Claims Don’t Add Up

Researchers at Seton Hall and New America Foundation track the Pentagon’s claims that released Guantanamo detainees ‘returned to battle.’

Phi Beta Iota: Government claims 1 in 5 and counts those who speak to the press against USG and Guantanamo.  Researcers find 1 in 25 at best and observe that the USG is simply not able to get the same story told in the same way more than once.

Appeal Hearing on Guantanamo: Main Issues

On January 26, 2010, a panel of military officers will hear the historic first direct appeal from the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay.  Oral argument in the case of United States v. al Bahlul will focus on three constitutional issues that reach beyond military commissions and terrorism trials.    The main issue in the case asks whether the war on terrorism justifies the censorship of foreign media. [Emphasis added.]

My Truth & Only My Truth

The Age of Affirmation: A new study finds that TV viewers watch the news more for affirmation than for information.

A new study suggests that viewers worldwide turn to particular broadcasters to affirm — rather than inform — their opinions. It’s a notion familiar to those dismayed by the paths blazed by cable news networks FOX and MSNBC — although the study finds one (perhaps unlikely) network may actually foster greater intellectual openness.

The study in the December issue of Media, War & Conflict by Shawn Powers, a fellow at the USC Center on Public Diplomacy, and Mohammed el-Nawawy, an assistant professor in the department of communication at Queens University of Charlotte, found that the longer viewers had been watching Al Jazeera English, the less dogmatic they were in their opinions and therefore more open to considering alternative and clashing opinions.