Robert Young Pelton: Bin Laden “Kill” & Back Story

07 Other Atrocities, 08 Wild Cards, 09 Terrorism, 10 Security, Corruption, Government, IO Deeds of War, Military
Robert Young Pelton

The story continues to develop.   This “house arrest” thing popped up when the US was beating on the Talibs to hand him over in Kandahar in 2001, then some faux intel from Brad Thor about Mullah Omar being under “house arrest” in Karachi and then now this. Sounds very familiar. Two fiction authors in the intel field being played for reasons unknown.  My jury is out on how much I want to believe Raelynn. There are some holes you can drive a truck through in flaws in logic but some ideas could be untangled to pick up a few new truths. Kinda like the blind man and the elephant.

Bin Laden Turned in by Informant — Courier Was Cover Story

Forget the cover story of waterboarding-leads-to-courier-leads-to bin Laden (not to deny the effectiveness of waterboarding, but it’s just not applicable in this case.)   Sources in the intelligence community tell me that after years of trying and one bureaucratically insane near-miss in Yemen, the US government killed OBL because a Pakistani intelligence officer came forward to collect the approximately $25 million reward from the State Department’s Rewards for Justice program.

The informant was a walk-in.  The ISI officer came forward to claim the substantial reward and to broker US citizenship for his family.

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Questions Raised by Real Story of How US Found Bin Laden

The real story of how the US found bin Laden raises some key questions, namely:

  • Why did the Saudis pay the Pakistanis to keep bin Laden?
  • Why did the Pakistani’s cooperate?
  • Did the ISI run the safe house itself or did it use a third party?
  • How permeable was the safe house?

A key to understanding why Saudi Arabia would finance bin Laden’s hideout is clarifying what the Saudis were actually paying for.  Bin Laden was esentially being kept under house arrest.

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See Also:

Bin Laden Show: Entries 01-76 CLOSED 17 May 2011