Stephen E. Arnold: More Changes to Google Search Results

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Stephen E. Arnold
Stephen E. Arnold

More Changes to Google Search Results

 

 

We learn about a couple of new changes Google is making to their search-result pages in “Google SERPs Updates: In-Depth Articles & Knowledge Graph Results for Car Shoppers” at Search Engine Watch. The car-shopping feature makes sense; Google has added vehicles to its Knowledge Graph in a way that allows users to do their comparison shopping right in the search results. That’s handy, and places Google in competition with auto comparison and shopping sites.

 

The in-depth article part is a little more complex. The company is positioning this change as helpful to those 10 percent of users Google says are after more than just a quick answer. While they do promise to include “up to” three in-depth articles and a link to pre-load “up to” ten more, these results are now pushed to the bottom of the page.

 

Writer Jennifer Slegg tells us:

 

“In-depth articles previously appeared in the middle of the search results. This update should help appease those webmasters who are concerned about organic search results being pushed lower and lower on the page, while still giving the searchers the information they want….

This change is currently available in English on Google.com, however they plan to expand the feature to more countries and languages in the future. Not all search results will have in-depth articles, but the program is expanding with more topics, particularly things that are related to current events. Google promises that alongside reputable and established news sources like the Washington Post and The Guardian, readers will also find in-depth content from smaller blogs and publications.”

 

This being a Search Engine Watch article, it does pass on Google’s advice for webmasters hoping to reach these users who are after comprehensive content. If you belong that slice of inquisitive searchers, just remember to scroll down and click through for the good stuff. Of course, it would make things easier for the search giant if that pesky ten percent would just get with the program and take what Google offers. Maybe someday.

 

Cynthia Murrell, December 31, 2013

 

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