Owl: “Suicided” Bankers Worth Over Half a Trillion in Life Insurance, Payable to Banks, Not Families — JP Morgan in Spotlight

07 Other Atrocities, 10 Transnational Crime, Commerce, Corruption
Who?  Who?
Who? Who?

Maybe They are Killing Bankers for Their Life Insurance?

Criminality can take many forms, based on the breadth and depth of human depravity and pathological ingenuity. Applying life insurance to pay off corporations when a current or former employee dies, in this case for bankers, a life insurance program called BOLI (bank-owned life insurance), has to represent a new low in corporate psychopathological viciousness and depravity in the corporate pursuit of money at all costs, even that of life itself, as long as is another’s life and not that of schemers who pursue such routes to profit themselves. To paraphrase a famous country song, Mama Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Bankers if you them to have a long life:

“It doesn’t get any more Orwellian than this: Wall Street mega banks crash the U.S. financial system in 2008. Hundreds of thousands of financial industry workers lose their jobs. Then, beginning late last year, a rash of suspicious deaths start to occur among current and former bank employees.  Next we learn that four of the Wall Street mega banks likely hold over $680 billion face amount of life insurance on their workers, payable to the banks, not the families. We ask their Federal regulator for the details of this life insurance under a Freedom of Information Act request and we’re told the information constitutes “trade secrets.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the life expectancy of a 25 year old male with a Bachelor’s degree or higher as of 2006 was 81 years of age. But in the past five months, five highly educated JPMorgan male employees in their 30s and one former employee aged 28, have died under suspicious circumstances, including three of whom allegedly leaped off buildings – a statistical rarity even during the height of the financial crisis in 2008. There is one other major obstacle to brushing away these deaths as random occurrences – they are not happening at JPMorgan’s closest peer bank – Citigroup. Both JPMorgan and Citigroup are global financial institutions with both commercial banking and investment banking operations. Their employee counts are similar – 260,000 employees for JPMorgan versus 251,000 for Citigroup.

Both JPMorgan and Citigroup also own massive amounts of bank-owned life insurance (BOLI), a controversial practice that pays the corporation when a current or former employee dies. (In the case of former employees, the banks conduct regular “death sweeps” of public records using former employees’ Social Security numbers to learn if a former employee has died and then submits a request for payment of the death benefit to the insurance company.) Wall Street On Parade carefully researched public death announcements over the past 12 months which named the decedent as a current or former employee of Citigroup or its commercial banking unit, Citibank. We found no data suggesting Citigroup was experiencing the same rash of deaths of young men in their 30s as JPMorgan Chase. Nor did we discover any press reports of leaps from buildings among Citigroup’s workers. Given the above set of facts, on March 21 of this year, we wrote to the regulator of national banks, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), seeking the following information under the Freedom of Information Act (See OCC Response to Wall Street On Parade’s Request for Banker Death Information): the number of deaths from 2008 through March 21, 2014 on which JPMorgan Chase collected death benefits; the total face amount of BOLI life insurance in force at JPMorgan; the total number of former and current employees of JPMorgan Chase who are insured under these policies; any peer studies showing the same data comparing JPMorgan  Chase with Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup.

The OCC responded politely by letter dated April 18, after first calling a few days earlier to inform us that we would be getting nothing under the sunshine law request. (On Wall Street, sunshine routinely means dark curtain.) The OCC letter advised that documents relevant to our request were being withheld on the basis that they are “privileged or contains trade secrets, or commercial or financial information, furnished in confidence, that relates to the business, personal, or financial affairs of any person,” or  relate to “a record contained in or related to an examination.”

Note this – my emphasis below:

The ironic reality is that the documents do not pertain to the personal financial affairs of individuals who have a privacy right. Individuals are not going to receive the proceeds of this life insurance for the most part. In many cases, they do not even know that multi-million dollar policies that pay upon their death have been taken out by their employer or former employer. Equally important, JPMorgan is a publicly traded company whose shareholders have a right under securities laws to understand the quality of its earnings – are those earnings coming from traditional banking and investment banking operations or is this ghoulish practice of profiting from the death of workers now a major contributor to profits on Wall Street?”

More:

Suspicious Deaths of Bankers Are Now Classified as “Trade Secrets” by Federal Regulator

Phi Beta Iota: Insurance companies are not stupid but they are very very corrupt.  As with 9/11, which no honest insurance company would ever have paid out on without a proper investigation that has not yet occurred — despite ample evidence sufficient to indict all the US principals — we suspect that this is a case of collusion between elements of the banks going for quick kills (pun intended), and life insurance companies with planned losses as part  of their own fraud schemes. Naturally the FBI is too busy to “notice” this glaring anomalous pattern.