Stephen Marrin: Improving Intelligence Studies as an Academic Discipline

IO Impotency
Stephen Marrin
Stephen Marrin

Improving Intelligence Studies as an Academic Discipline

Intelligence and National Security, 22 October 2014

In recent years there has been significant growth in the numbers and kinds of intelligence-related educational and training opportunities, with the knowledge taught in these courses and programs derived from the body of intelligence studies scholarship. The question posed here is: to what extent is this body of knowledge sufficient as a basis for the development of intelligence studies as an academic discipline?

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Intelligence and National Security on 22/10/2014, available free online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02684527.2014.952932#.VK4-BCusWVM.

Phi Beta Iota: At the request of Robert Steele, curator of Phi Beta Iota, and with the hearty endorsement of Loch Johnson dean of intelligence studies and editor of the journal in question, this article has been made free to the public for a period of three years. Intelligence studies are in their infancy for lack of sophistication as well as integrity across the discipline. Well-intentioned good people, assuredly, but most of them have no idea how to do citation analytics, multi-lingual research, ethnographic studies or — the height of the profession when done in an integral fashion: holistic analytics, true cost economics, and open source everything engineering. Professor Marrin has established a baseline and pointedly observes that we do not have a collective memory. The discipline can only improve.

See Also:

Analytics @ Phi Beta Iota

Big Data @ Phi Beta Iota

OSINT Literature Review, Name Association, Lessons Learned

UN Paper: Beyond Data Monitoring – Achieving the Sustainability Development Goals Through Intelligence (Decision-Support) Integrating Holistic Analytics, True Cost Economics, and Open Source Everything