Robert Steele: Elsevier Reeling on Sharing

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Robert David STEELE Vivas
Robert David STEELE Vivas

Elsevier is feeling the strong pressure from a world-wide movement to force them into sensibility about sharing. Universities around the world, including MIT, and many other parties, have signed a strong denouncement here.

Buried within the comments, where Elsevier’s Alicia Wise is participating, is this statement that I have accepted in agreeing to do an article for Technology in Society — my article will appear at Phi Beta Iota on the same day that the journal is published.

Our sharing policy is more liberal in supporting the dissemination and use of research:

* At each stage of the publication process authors can share their research: before submission, from acceptance, upon publication, and post publication.

* In institutional repositories, which no longer require a formal agreement to host full text content

* Authors can also share on commercial platforms such as social collaboration networks

Addendum: Elsevier has not changed its published policy which the earlier post challenges. They are reluctantly accommodating the real possibility that they might be put out of business by scholars who are gradually realizing their power to publish openly. At this time there is a positive about formal publishing that is priceless: the ability to do citation analytics. The negative is that less than 1% of all published information is properly published, indexed, or susceptible to formal citation analytics. This is an important gap in human knowledge management (made all the more difficult when considering historical publications, multi-lingual publication, and multi-media forms of knowledge preservation).

Typer Neylon: Elsevier Loses Its Mind – Seeks to Embargo Knowledge for Four Years

See Also:

David Isenberg: Death for Reed-Elsevier, Life for Knowledge

Michel Bauwens: Aaron Swartz’s Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto

Stephen E. Arnold: 1% of Science Gets Published — What Cost to Economics?