Berto Jongman: History, Big Data, Instability

IO Impotency
Berto Jongman

History as a giant data set: how analysing the past could help save the future

Turchin’s work – which incorporates not just history and maths, but also the research of economists, other social scientists, and environmental scientists – provides a much-needed corrective to decades of specialisation within these disciplines.

Read full article.

ROBERT STEELE: My first graduate degree included use of a volume by Banks & Textor, basic data points for comparing countries.  That was also coincident with the collapse of Political Science (Current History) as a discipline — by herd agreement, lazy corrupt PhDs agreed that doing data analytics from their cubicles, without ever learning a foreign language or visiting a foreign country, was an adequate substitute for advancement and tenure. Turchin’s idea is interesting in concept, but all evidence suggests that the data integrity and data inclusion is simply not there.  Most of history is a lie, regardless of the language; Turchin’s work is fractional (1% processed of 1% collected of 1% published of 1% written of 1% known) and is neither multi-lingual nor multi-media in nature., Turchin merits encouragement — provided he  can embrace holistic analytics to the local level, true cost economics, and full-spectrum human sources at all levels.