Review: Real-World Intelligence

4 Star, Intelligence (Commercial), Intelligence (Government/Secret)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gem of continuing value–“must read” for busy managers,

April 8, 2000
Herbert E. Meyer
Herb, one of the distinguished speakers at OSS ’92, has been Vice Chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and is in my mind one of the top five pioneers of business intelligence in the United States. He started in late 1970’s, and his little paperback book is both a gospel and a guide of continuing value. This book was distributed at OSS ’92, and continues to be worthy of reading by senior executives who don’t do a lot of reading.
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Review: Global Perspectives on Competitive Intelligence

4 Star, Intelligence (Commercial)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Benchmark book on a relatively young discipline of CI/BI,

April 8, 2000
John E. Prescott
This is the most professional collection of articles on competitive intelligence I know of, with a good mix of both technical intelligence and foreign intelligence information. The Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP)has grown from 2,000 members in 1992 to 6,000 in 1999, and it’s journal as well as its conferences, set the industry standard. A relatively low standard, but the standard never-the-less.
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Review: The Warroom Guide to Competitive Intelligence

4 Star, Intelligence (Commercial)
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4.0 out of 5 stars War Room Good, CIA “Tricks” Bad Business,

April 8, 2000
Steven M. Shaker
I have mixed feeling about these guys, and their book, but the bottom line is that it makes a contribution and must be read. They address, in a manner understandable by the complete layman, the intersection of competitive intelligence, corporate security, and WarRoom operations. They have a number of very useful and thoughtful figures. The book is unquestionably at the head of the class with respect to WarRoom operations and exploiting information technology and basic planning and execution and visualization concepts. Where I have a real problem with this book is in its advocacy of elicitation and other deceptive techniques, no doubt a hang-over from Steven’s days as a CIA case officer. There is absolutely no place in U.S. competitive intelligence for such methods, and any discussion in that direction must be forcefully opposed if we are to succeed in creating a legal, ethical, overt network of intelligence professionals able to reinforce each other in providing open source intelligence to businesses as well as non-governmental organizations.
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Review: The Intelligent Corporation–Creating a Shared Network for Information and Profit

4 Star, Intelligence (Commercial)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Essential reference on making companies “smart”,

April 8, 2000
Ruth Stanat
Well before I got into the open source business Ruth was managing global business intelligence activities, and she wrote the book I would have written if I had had to choose one starting point. This is an essential reference for every manager, both in government and in business as well as in the non-profit arena, and I continue to regard Ruth as the dean of the practical business intelligence educators. Together with Jan Herring, Dick Klavans, Herb Meyer, and Leonard Fuld, she completes the de facto U.S. board of directors for real-world business intelligence.
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Review: The Puzzle Palace–Inside the National Security Agency, America’s Most Secret Intelligence Organization

5 Star, Intelligence (Government/Secret)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best book on SIGINT, best use of open sources,

April 8, 2000
James Bamford
The book is nothing short of sensational, for two reasons: itis the first and still the only really comprehensive look at globalsignals intelligence operations as dominated by the National Security Agency; and second, because all of his research was done using only open sources, including unclassified employee newsletters at Alice Springs, and he did a great job of making the most out of legally and ethically available information. James is still around, working on another book about SIGINT, and I believe that only he will be able to top this one.
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Review: Deep Black–Space Espionage and National Security

5 Star, Intelligence (Government/Secret)
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5.0 out of 5 stars

Best book on Cold War spy satellites in space,

April 8, 2000
William E. Burrows
This is still the only really great book on overhead reconnaissance, and I have been surprised and disappointed to see it overlooked by the mainstream intelligence academics. Contains useful early history on why we got into technical collection (our human spies kept getting killed on arrival as we took the easy route of recruiting from émigré organizations already penetrated by the KGB and GRU). Ends with a passing reference to commercial imagery, a topic that merits its own book.

To Fool a Glass Eye: Camouflage Versus Photoreconnaissance in World War II recommended by comment below.

Also:
Commercial Satellite Imagery and GIS (Springer Praxis Books / Geophysical Sciences)
Commercial Satellite Imagery and United Nations Peacekeeping: A View from Above

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