Journal: Statecraft, Soulcraft, & Well-Being

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David Brooks

Op-Ed Columnist

The Sandra Bullock Trade

Two things happened to Sandra Bullock this month. First, she won an Academy Award for best actress. Then came the news reports claiming that her husband is an adulterous jerk. So the philosophic question of the day is: Would you take that as a deal? Would you exchange a tremendous professional triumph for a severe personal blow?

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If the relationship between money and well-being is complicated, the correspondence between personal relationships and happiness is not. The daily activities most associated with happiness are sex, socializing after work and having dinner with others. The daily activity most injurious to happiness is commuting. According to one study, joining a group that meets even just once a month produces the same happiness gain as doubling your income. According to another, being married produces a psychic gain equivalent to more than $100,000 a year.

Full Story Online

If you want to find a good place to live, just ask people if they trust their neighbors. Levels of social trust vary enormously, but countries with high social trust have happier people, better health, more efficient government, more economic growth, and less fear of crime (regardless of whether actual crime rates are increasing or decreasing).

See also:

Amazon Page: The Hidden Wealth of Nations

Amazon Page: The Politics of Happiness: What Government Can Learn from the New Research on Well-Being

Review: Statecraft as Soulcraft

Review: The Power of the Powerless–Citizens Against the State in Central-Eastern Europe