Who’s Who in Peace Intelligence: Dave Warner

Dr. Dr. Dave Warner (MD PhD)

Gov 2.0 Summit 09: Dave Warner, “Rapid Fire: Location, Location, Location”

Reachback to Jalalabad

Dave Warner  MindTel

ARCH Synergist

http://projects.mindtel.com

Dave Warner is a Medical Neuroscientist and the Director of Medical Intelligence at MindTel. His interests include interventional informatics, medical communications, distributed medical intelligence, biosensors, quantitative human performance, expressional interface systems and physio-informatics. He has been engaged in humanitarian assistance and information and communication technologies (ICT) applications for a number of years, with recent activity in Afghanistan, Iraq, Africa, and Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Dr. Warner graduated from San Diego State University in 1988, with a degree in Physical Science. He then entered the combined MD/PhD program at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). His passion as an undergraduate was human expression. Specifically, he sought to learn how a thought becomes an intention for expression and then how the physiology of the body facilitates that expression through some medium. The medium he chose was information systems: informatics. At LLUMC Dr. Warner’s doctoral research was in the Department of Neurophysiology. He also founded MindTel in May 1997 to commercialize intelligent communication products for healthcare, education, and recreation. An initial focus is the development of hardware and software products that can be deployed cost-effectively so that disabled computer users can more effectively express themselves through the World Wide Web. The hardware products include sensors, transducers, and computer interface modules. The associated NeatTools software comprises a highly versatile visual programming environment for interfacing hardware and software modules. MindTel is also actively engaged in consulting activities in telemedicine and Web-based communication systems.

STRONG ANGEL III

STRONG ANGEL Cool Summary

Short Biography II

Dave Warner is a Medical Neuroscientist and the Director of Medical Intelligence at MindTel. His interests include interventional informatics, medical communications, distributed medical intelligence, biosensors, quantitative human performance, expressional interface systems and physio-informatics. He has been engaged in humanitarian assistance and information and communication technologies (ICT) applications for a number of years, with recent activity in Afghanistan, Iraq, Africa, and Banda Aceh, Indonesia. He is running Operation Shadowlite as part of the Strong Angel III demonstration. Dr. Warner graduated from San Diego State University with a degree in Physical Science. He then entered the combined MD/PhD program at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). His passion as an undergraduate was human expression. Specifically, he sought to learn how a thought becomes an intention for expression and then how the physiology of the body facilitates that expression through some medium. The medium he chose was information systems: informatics. At LLUMC Dr. Warner’s doctoral research was in the Department of Neurophysiology. He also founded MindTel in May 1997 to commercialize intelligent communication products for healthcare, education, and recreation. An initial focus is the development of hardware and software products that can be deployed cost-effectively so that disabled computer users can more effectively express themselves through the World Wide Web. The hardware products include sensors, transducers, and computer interface modules. The associated NeatTools software comprises a highly versatile visual programming environment for interfacing hardware and software modules. MindTel is also actively engaged in consulting activities in telemedicine and Web-based communication systems.

A few acquaintances

A few more acquaintances

NIUSR 2009 JOINT BOARDS

Distributed Medical Intelligence (DMI)

Distributed Medical Intelligence (DMI) is a working model of operational and disaster medicine support infrastructure and tools that enable communities to prevent, respond to, and recover from mass casualty disasters, including both natural and man made disasters at home and abroad. The DMI model supports the development and advancement of situational awareness, communication technology, and disaster medicine support tools in the areas of education and training, research, technology transfer and commercialization, and industry.

The goals of DMI are to: (1) provide more efficient and effective medical preparations, responses, and recovery from mass casualty situations, such as the terrorist events of 9-11, and threats of bio-terrorism; and (2) support communities to reduce the medical consequences of disaster events.

DMI will achieve its full potential when well-trained first responders and physician consultants can provide on-demand care around the globe using state-of-the-art information technology and telemedicine tools.

Project Examples:

TIDES Content Visualization

TIDES – (Trans-lingual Information Detection, Extraction and Summarization) was a DARPA project that was taken on as a data feed from a production network when it became a production rather than research effort.

TIDES Information is searched from 80 to 300 information sources such as newspapers each day looking for epidemiological data, at the beginning of an epidemic.

Information is translated, summarized and delivered to subscribers, including the White House and National Security Council each day.

The Focus is on Epidemiology—and the programme is run by Team Members Dr. Eric Rasmussen, Fleet Surgeon of 3rd Fleet (DARPA) and Bob Younger of SSC-SD. supported by Dr. Dave Warner of Syracuse University and MindTel.

http://projects.mindtel.com/2001/1130.magic-discover/

An Example of content Geospatial Location

http://projects.mindtel.com/2002/0328.TIDES.geotemporal/

Spatial Temporal Content Distribution

Shadow Operations / DMI – Distributed Medical Intelligence/Public Safety

In these “Shadow” Operations efforts were focused on the enhancement of a communications rich test bed and establishment of a context for operations involving a partnership between the public and private communities that emphasizes networked sensors, high-volume data visualization, predictive analysis and emergency response collaboration.

Event Driven Shadow Operations allowed the research team to specify an event-specific experience base, a relevant suite of information technology tools, and a methodology to apply the tools in a unified command environment to provide situation awareness.

Research into situational awareness concepts in terms of their applicability to ongoing Department of Defense operations enabled the research team to make relevant recommendations for innovative approaches to assist field commanders in establishing and maintaining improved Battle Space understanding and shareable situational awareness. The output of this effort was a steady stream of custom-tailored geo-referenced visualization products based on fused, open- and multi-source data to add to the event-specific geospatial framework.

Strong Angel (RIMPAC 2004), June 2004 www.strongangel.org

Strong Angel is an experiment in combining Civil and Military Operations for Humanitarian Assistance.   Strong Angel 1 was an extension to the RIMPAC 2000 Naval exercise conducted jointly by the Pacific Rim countries.  Conducted in an extremely austere environment, Strong Angel 1 put a range of new technologies to the test under desert conditions.   Telemedicine technologies were used to provide medical support into a simulated refugee camp in a remote desert site.

The Strong Angel project is bringing focus, energy, and resources to the development of new knowledge for refining advanced applications of emerging technologies to meet the requirements of developing a globally deployable, intelligently configurable medical communication matrix.  Strong Angel 2 took place July, 2004

Shadow Bowl. (Super Bowl @ Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego, January 2003) www.shadowbowl.org

Shadow Bowl was a community readiness and medical response exercise held in conjunction with the 2003 Super Bowl in San Diego.

The DMI team worked in conjunction with the San Diego Police Department to provide situational awareness for the Super Bowl, which addressed specific threats identified in the Department of Justice vulnerability assessment for the event.

The goals of the project were to provide enhanced public safety using an advanced communication network and sensor grid, develop mass casualty surge capabilities through medical reach-back, and build a collaboration model between civilian, military, public, and private partners.

The results of the Shadow Bowl Exercise accentuated the value of new telemedicine tools in treating large number of patients when local hospital saturation occurs in any disaster situation.

http://shadowbowl.sdsu.edu/

An operational multi screen fusion center at Shadow Bowl

http://projects.mindtel.com/2003/04.ShadowofSuperbowl_CBausch/

Published report for First Responders

http://projects.mindtel.com/2004/TelemedicineJournal.shadowbowl/

Published report in Telemedicine Journal

Desert Bloom – Desert Bloom (DARPA) Grand Challenge, April 2004

http://projects.mindtel.com/2004/03.desertbloom/

The DARPA Grand Challenge leveraged American ingenuity to accelerate the development of autonomous vehicle technologies that can be applied to military requirements.  The robot ground vehicles were tested on a 200 mile course from Barstow, CA to Primm, NV.

Desert Bloom was a “shadow” operation, which featured Civil and Military collaboration to explore next generation communications as applied to event and disaster response.  Operation Desert Bloom integrated edge networks and organizations into 3 functional Command and Control Centers for the Grand Challenge to provide vehicle GPC tracking and status, real-time Geospatial medical resource tracking, and clinical resource deployment methods to address the identified vulnerability threats.

Montana Statewide Bioterrorism Exercise

Conducted this past June, the exercise demonstrated the efficacy of applying advanced communication technologies to improve preparedness and response to a large scale disaster.   The exercise integrated Montana Public Health Officers and a 29 site Telehealth network to organize and manage the response to a simulated plague disaster.   Best of breed tools were identified, integrated, and demonstrated.

Conventional Biography Circa 2004

Dave Warner, MD, Ph.D.

Medical Neuroscientist                                                                                      [email protected]

Dir. Medical Intelligence                                                                             http://www.mindtel.com/

MindTel http://projects.mindtel.com

Professional Preparation

Loma Linda University           Ph.D.               Physio-informatics                  2000

Loma Linda University           MD                  Doctor of Medicine                1995

San Diego State University    BA                  Physical Science                      1986

(Emphasis in Physics, Mathematics and Philosophy)

Academic/Professional Appointments

Research Assistant Professor, Dept ECS  Syracuse University NY

Adjunct Research Professor, College of Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

Active Research Areas:

Integrative Intelligent Systems; Interventional Informatics; Medical Communications; Distributed Medical intelligence; Bio-sensors; Quantitative Human performance; Expressional interface systems; Physio-informatics; Intelligent Interface-metrics; User Tracking Interface systems; Distributed tele-robotic controllers; Inter-mental Networking; Bio-cybernetics systems; Cognitive Neuroscience; Perceptual Psycho-physics; Perceptual state space modulation; Physiology; Physics; Mathematics; Philosophy; General Systems

Other professional responsibilities

Director, Institute for Interventional Informatics (I3), San Diego, CA.  I3 is an organization dedicated to the intelligent implementation of interactive information technologies in Health Care and Education

CIO, MindTel LLC, Director of Medical Intelligence, Syracuse, NY.  MindTel is devoted to solving leading-edge problems in communication, healthcare, education, and recreation

Director, Center For Really Neat Research, Rancho Santa Fe, CA .  Center for Really Neat Research coordinates and develops applications and research using object-oriented software program called “Neat Tools” for sensor networks, bio-robotics, and visualization.

Current Grant Funding

Physio Info Tronics SPAWAR  – 4 year 3.8M, renewed for FY-04.  Current grant with SPAWAR received over $1.1M in last 18 months in support of research efforts in the fields of sensor network visualization, command and control interface systems, distributed networks, community communications infrastructure architecture and distributed medical intelligence for civil support of public safety/ homeland security.  Our research grant has recently been renewed, and we expect to continue for the full duration of the grant (currently set to expire in June 2005 with a cap of $3.8M)

Recent efforts:

Shadowbowl  See http://www.shadowbowl.org/

http://vader.mindtel.com/users/davew/03-1/cci-03/Comms-03.doc

Current Efforts:

In collaboration with San Diego State University and NIMA we are currently serving the information and communication needs of the CENTCOM Humanitarian  Operations Center. We are engaged in ongoing efforts in networking and communications to support the humanitarian intelligence efforts both nationally and on the ground in Iraq.

Current Projects.

National Reconnaissance Office -SBU.  (Sensitive But Unclassified) Knowledge fusion and interactive representations.  Project Director, Desert Bloom Shadow Operation around DARPA Grand Challenge (http://www.darpa.mil/grandchallenge/index.htm)

Biography

Dave Warner, a medical neuroscientist with an MD/PhD  from Loma Linda University, and director of the Institute for Interventional Informatics, has gained international recognition for pioneering new methods of physiologically based human-computer interaction. Dr. Warner’s research efforts have focused on advanced instrumentation and new methods of analysis, which can be applied to evaluating various aspects of human function as it relates to human-computer interaction.  His efforts are to identify methods and techniques that optimize information flow between humans and computers. Dr. Warner’s work has indicated an optimal mapping of interactive interface technologies to the human nervous system’s capacity to transduce, assimilate, and respond intelligently to information in an integrative-multisensory interaction and will fundamentally change the way that humans interact with information systems. Application areas for this work include quantitative assessment of human performance, augmentative communication systems, environmental controls for the disabled, medical communications and integrated interactive educational systems. Dr. Warner is particularly active in technology transfer of aerospace and other defense derived technologies to the fields of health care and education. Specific areas of interest are: advanced instrumentation for the acquisition and analysis of medically relevant biological signals; intelligent informatic systems, which augment both the general flow of medical information and provide decision support for the health care professional; public accesses health information databases designed to empower the average citizen to become more involved in their own health care; and advanced training technologies, which will adaptively optimize interactive educational systems to the capacity of the user.

Much of his recent work has been in using Shadow Operations to rapidly prototype and develop military/civilian operations capabilities in very difficult settings such as refugee camps, disaster areas, and regions of major civilian interaction in both the US and overseas.  Much of his work is directed at law enforcement and the intelligence community in delivering capabilities that are scaleable and actually work for real responders in difficult situations.  His team of shadow operation specialists have worked closely with senior DOD and intelligence community managers, as well as law enforcement officers on the street.  His focus is on delivering inexpensive, yet highly capable communications, visualization, and decision support systems.

Selected Publications

Warner D, Rusovick R, Balch D (1998) The Globalization of Interventional Informatics Through Internet Mediated Distributed Medical Intelligence, New Medicine

Warner D, Tichenor J.M, Balch D.C. (1996) Telemedicine and Distributed Medical Intelligence, Telemedicine Journal 2: 295-301.

Warner, D., Anderson, T., and Joh Johannsen. (1994). Bio-Cybernetics: A Biologically Responsive Interactive Interface, in Medicine Meets Virtual Reality II: Interactive Technology & Healthcare: Visionary Applications for Simulation Visualization Robotics. (pp. 237-241). San Diego, CA, USA: Aligned Management Associates.

Warner, D., Sale, J., Price, S. and Will, D. (1992). Remapping the Human-Computer Interface for Optimized Perceptualization of Medical Information, in Proceedings of Medicine Meets Virtual Reality. San Diego, CA: Aligned Management Associates.

Warner, D., Sale, J. and Price, S. (1991). The Neurorehabilitation Workstation: A Clinical Application for Machine-Resident Intelligence, in Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. ( pp. 1266-1267). Los Alamos, CA: IEEE Computer Society Press.

Sale EJ, Warner DJ, Price S, Will AD.  Compressed complexity parameter.  Proceedings of the 2nd International Brain Topography Conference., Toronto, Ontario. 1991

Warner DJ, Price SH, Sale EJ, Will AD.  Chaotropic dynamical analysis of the EEG.  Brain Topography. 1990.

Warner DJ, Price SH, Sale EJ, Will AD.  Chaotropic Dynamical Analysis of the EEG.  Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology. 1990.

Warner D, Will AD.  Dynamical analysis of EEG: evidence for a low-dimensional attractor in absence epilepsy.  Neurology. 1990 April;40(1):351.

Will AD, Sale EJ, Price S, Warner DJ, Peterson GW.  Quantitative measurement of the “milkmaid” sign in Huntington’s disease.  Annals of Neurology. 1991;30:320

Warner DJ, Will AD, Peterson GW, Price SH, Sale EJ.  The VPL data glove as an instrument for quantitative motion analysis.  Brain Topography. 1990.

Warner DJ, Will AD, Peterson GW, Price SH, Sale EJ.  The VPL data glove as an instrument for quantitative motion analysis.  Brain Topography. 1990.

Will AD, Warner DJ, Peterson GW, Price SH, Sale EJ. Quantitative motion analysis of the hand using the data glove.  Muscle and Nerve. 1990.

Will AD, Warner DJ, Peterson GW, Sale EJ, Price SH.  The data glove for precise quantitative measurement of upper motor neuron (UMN) function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).  Annals of Neurology. 1990;28:210.

Will AD, Warner DJ, Peterson GW, Price SH, Sale EJ.  Quantitative analysis of tremor and chorea using the VPL data glove.  Annals of Neurology. 1990;28:299.

Warner DJ, Will AD, Peterson GW, Price SH, Sale EJ.  The VPL data glove as a tool for hand rehabilitation and communication.  Annals of Neurology. 1990;28:272.