Event: 29-30 April, Nottingham UK History of the CIA

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MAJOR CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF THE CIA – 29/30 APRIL 2011

“LANDSCAPES OF SECRECY: THE CIA IN HISTORY, FICTION, AND MEMORY”

VENUE: EAST MIDLANDS CONFERENCE CENTRE, UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM, NG2 7RD, UK

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS UNIQUE CONFERENCE IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Listen to top speakers, including Christopher Andrew, Nigel West, Robert Jervis and Wesley Wark at the largest ever conference on the history of the Central Intelligence Agency.  The event covers the history of Cold War espionage with famous events such as the “Bay of Pigs” and the shoot-down of the U2 spy-plane. It also covers spy-film and spy-fiction with panels discussing subjects such as Ian Fleming’s portrayal of the CIA in the iconic OO7 James Bond novels.


REGISTRATIONS FOR ATTENDANCE CAN BE MADE ONLINE HERE

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/american/landscapes/registration/registration.aspx

REGISTRATION BY PHONE

If you do not wish to book online you can register by phone. To book a conference ticket you can call the Warwick Arts Centre on 02476 524 524 (or 011 44 2476 524 524 from the USA).

If you require extra nights of accommodation around the time of the conference these can booked directly with the East Midlands Conference Centre by calling 0115 846 2000 (or 011 44 115 846 2000 from the USA).



LANDSCAPES OF SECRECY: THE CIA IN HISTORY, FICTION, AND MEMORY: PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME



DAY 1: FRIDAY 29 APRIL 2011



9.00 Coffee and registration for attendees



9.20  Opening Remarks, Richard Aldrich, University of Warwick



9.35-11.15 Panel 1a: Origins: OSS and the rebirth of the CIA

Chair/Discussant: Dr Kaeten Mistry, University of Warwick

Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, University of Edinburgh

“The Origins of the CIA”

Professor David Stafford, University of Edinburgh

“Britain and the origins of the CIA”

Professor Richard Immerman, Temple University

“OSS and the transition to the CIA”



9.35-11.15 Panel 1b: The CIA, Television and Film

Chair/Discussant: Professor Tony Shaw, University of Hertfordhsire

Simon Willmetts, University of Warwick

“Hitchcock and the CIA”

Dr Trevor McCrisken, University of Warwick

“The CIA and American Television”

Tricia Jenkins, Texas Christian University

“The CIA and the Problems of Docudrama: A look at Syriana and The Good Shepherd



9.35-11.15 Panel 1c:



11.20-1.00 Panel 2a: The CIA and their friends

Chair/discussant: Professor Richard Aldrich

Don Munton and Kurt Jensen,

“Intelligence Liaison and the CIA in the early Cold War years”

Professor Cees Wiebes, NcTB Netherlands

“The CIA and its European allies: The Case of the Netherlands”

Peer Henrik Hansen, Cold War Museum, Denmark

“Cooperation, complications and covert operations: CIA and Danish Intelligence, 1946-63”



11.20-1.00 Panel 2b: The CIA and American Faction/Fiction

Chair/Discussant: Professor Wesley Wark, University of Toronto *

Professor Fred Hitz, Princeton University

“Fiction, Faction and Reality in American spy-fiction”

Professor Jonathan Nashel, University of South Bend, Indiana

“The CIA in popular American fiction”



11.20-1.00 Panel 2c: Cold War flashpoints

Chair/Discussant: David Robarge, CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence

Dr Nicholas Dujmovic, CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence

Origins and Development of the CIA Paramilitary function in the early Cold War”

Dr Paul Maddrell, Aberystwyth University

“The CIA and the GDR in the Cold War”

Professor Hugh Wilford, California State University Long Beach

“America’s Great Game: The CIA and the Middle East in the early Cold War”



1.00 – 2.30 Lunch



2.30-3.30 Keynote Speech.

Professor Robert Jervis, Columbia University

“Why the CIA Doen’t Do Better”





15.30-15.45: Tea and coffee break



15.45 -17.30 Panel 3a: The CIA, declassification, and the Foreign Relations of the United States series

Chair: TBC

Ted Keefer, former general editor of the Foreign Relations of the United States series, Office of the Historian, State Department

“Documenting the CIA’s role in the FRUS series”

Professor Robert J. McMahon, Mershon Center, Ohio State University

“The CIA and the FRUS series: the Indonesian case”

Dr Paul McGarr, University of Nottingham

“’Playing Games with History’: The State Department, the CIA, and the FRUS series”



15.45 -17.30 Panel 3b: Lost Landscapes

Chair/Discussant: Dr Steve Hewitt, University of Birmingham

Dr Zakia Shiraz, University of Warwick

“White Out: The CIA and the Drugs Debate”

Dr Helen Laville, University of Birmingham

“Women and the CIA”

Professor Kathryn Olmsted, UC Davis

“The CIA and Conspiracy Theories”



15.45 – 17.30 Panel 3c: Broader Perspectives

Chair/Discussant: TBC

Dr Adam Svendsen,

“The CIA and the Globalisation of Intelligence”

Eugene S. Poteat, AFIO

“The Ever-Changing Role of the CIA: From OSS Covert Operations, to Analysis, to High-Tech and Back”



19.00 Conference Reception and Dinner for all attendees and delegates



After dinner speaker:

Professor Chris Andrew, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

“’The CIA and US Intelligence: the view from Moscow and London”



DAY 2: SATURDAY 30 APRIL 2011



9.00 Coffee available from 9.00



9.00-10.30 Panel 4a: The CIA, Cuba and the Bay of Pigs after fifty years

Chair/Discussant: TBC

Professor Timothy Naftali, Nixon Presidential Library

“Kennedy, the CIA and Castro after the Cuban Missile Crisis”

Professor Peter Kornbluh, National Security Archive

“Cuba, the Bay of Pigs and the CIA”

James Perry,

‘The Necessary Failure: the Bay of Pigs in Global Context”



9.00-10.30 Panel 4b: The CIA, Memoirs and the Press

Chair/Discussant: Dr Nicholas Dujmovic, CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence

Professor Richard J. Aldrich, University of Warwick

“Renegades and Outriders: The CIA and Journalism”

Dr Chris Moran, University of Warwick

“Memories and Memoirs”

John Hollister Hedley,

“The CIA and the review of publications by CIA authors”



9.00-10.30 Panel 4c:



10.30-10.45 Tea and coffee break



10.45-12.15 Panel 5a: The CIA in the era of the Nixon administration

Chair/Discussant: Professor Peter Kornbluh, National Security Archive

Professor Randall B. Woods, University of Arkansas

“William E. Colby and the CIA”

Dr Christian Gustafson, Brunel University

“Nixon, Kissinger, the CIA, and Chile”

Dr Robert McNamara, University of Ulster

“Intelligence Assessments and Southern Africa in the 1970s”



10.45-12.15: Panel 5b: The CIA and intelligence assessment

Chair/Discussant: Matthew Aid, National Security Archive

Professor Len Scott, Aberystwyth University

The CIA and the Cuban Missile Crisis”

Dr Philip Davies, Brunel University

“The CIA and the national estimating system”

Dr Stephen Marrin. Brunel University

“The CIA’s analysis in the post-Cold War World”





10.45-12.15 Panel 5c: CIA Operations and the question of Covert Action

Chair/Discussant: Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, University of Edinburgh

David Robarge, CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence

“CIA Covert Action and Democracy”

Dr David Ryan, University College, Cork

“The CIA and the mining of Nicaragua’s harbours in 1984”

Chris Pocock, author and defense editor

“The Black Bats: Covert Air Operations over China from Taiwan, 1951-1969”



12.15-13.15 Lunch



13.15-14.15 Plenary address. Professor Wesley Wark, University of Toronto

“The CIA and Western Culture”



14.15-15.45 Panel 6a: Sigint and counter-intelligence

Chair/Discussant: TBC

Dr Matthew Aid, National Security Archive

“The CIA sigint programme and its relations with the NSA”

Professor Jonathan Haslam, University of Cambridge

“Soviet counter-intelligence against US operations in Moscow”

Hayden Peake,

“On the Origins of Cold War Counterintelligence in the United States”



14.15-15.45 Panel 6b: Cultural and intellectual encounters

Chair/Discussant: Professor Fred Hitz, Princeton University

Professor Nick Cullather, Indiana University

“The CIA, the culture of intelligence failure, and the Bogotoza episode of 1948’

Dr David Milne, University of East Anglia

“American Intellectuals, the CIA, and intelligence analysis”

Dr Maria Ryan, University of Nottingham

“The CIA and the post-Cold War environment: threats and estimates during the ‘unipolar moment’”

Dr Jason Harding, School of Advanced Study, University of London

“The CIA and Encounter magazine”



15.45-16.15 Coffee Break



16.15-17.45 Roundtable panel 7a on the CIA and declassification

Chair/Discussant: Richard Immerman, Temple University

David Robarge, CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence

“Recent CIA initiatives in the field”

Professor Mark Fenster, University of Florida

TBC

Dr Matthew Aid, National  Security Archive

Professor Nick Cullather, Indiana University

Professor Robert J. McMahon, Mershon Center, Ohio State University



16.15-17.45 Roundtable panel 7b on the CIA post-war American Culture

Chair/Discussant: Professor Scott Lucas, University of Birmingham

Professor Fred Hitz, Princeton University

Professor Hugh Wilford, California State University, Long Beach

Professor Wesley Wark, University of Toronto

Professor Jonathan Nashel, University of South Bend, Indiana

Professor Richard J Aldrich
Room BO.12
Department of Politics and International Studies
Social Science Building
University of Warwick
Coventry CV4 7AL

R.J.Aldrich @warwick.ac.uk

tel: 02476 523 523

fax: 02476 524 221