Stephen E. Arnold: Yales Censors Superior Course Catalog Made By Its Own Students

Academia, Idiocy
Stephen E. Arnold
Stephen E. Arnold

Yale on Free Expression: A Quote to Note

Years ago I gave a lecture at Yale. My subject was Google. I ran through the basic points in The Google Legacy and Google Version 2.0. The audience reacted as if I had dissected a dead frog. I received a smattering of polite applause and headed out for a talk in New York City. So much for Yale and the idea that Google was more than a Web search company.

I just read “Yale Students Made a Better Version of Their Course Catalogue. Then Yale Shut It Down.” A couple of students put up a Web page that allowed students to pinpoint classes and compare student ratings of professors. Sounds like an app to me.

Information? Who said it was supposed to be free? Image source: http://1.usa.gov/1dFIhW9

But Yale perceived the Web page differently. Here’s the quote:

‘Yale’s policy on free expression and free speech entitles no one to appropriate a Yale resource and use it as their [sic] own ,’ the statement read. It further stated its main priority at this time was supporting its own resources, ‘not others created independently and without the university’s cooperation or permission,’ and that ‘all the information on the website remains available to students on the Yale site.’

I assume the Washington Post is semi-accurate, just like an Amazon recommendation.

What did the future bonesmen learn? A nuance of academic freedom in Yale Land has been broadcast in an analogue transmission.

Will these two free thinkers demonstrate digital initiative in the future? Is Yale turning out well-trained online researchers for the next-generation information highway?

Stephen E Arnold, January 18, 2014