David Isenberg: The Perils of Privatizing Intelligence

Ever since former Booz Allen Hamilton contractor Edward Snowden started revealing national Security Agency documents earlier this year there has been renewed debate about what is the proper balance between public and private sector roles and participation in the intelligence community.  This is an issue, which, in recent years, has periodically come up, but has …

David Isenberg: Protecting Victims of the Privatization of War

Isenberg Institute of Strategic Satire Protecting the Victims of the Privatization of War  Over the years we have seen numerous cases of various abuses and outright crimes by private military and security contractors (PMSC).  True, they don’t happen every day, and don’t reflect the actions of the vast majority of the contractors working overseas but …

David Isenberg: 70% of the US Intelligence Community — Contractors — Reasonably Subject to Question on Both Legal and Efficiency Grounds

From Boox Allen to James Bond EXTRACT (CONCLUSION): Ms. Windsor’s bottom line is this: When the government forms contracts for core governmental functions, particularly in the area of national security, the consequences of problems arising under those contracts can be severe. Preventing those harms is in the United States’ interest, under the two-pronged policy of …

David Isenberg: What Rules, If Any, Should Govern Death by Drone? (Never mind the 98% collateral damage….)

What Rules Should Govern US Drone Attacks? April 4, 2013 Kenneth Roth Larry Towell/Magnum Photos Drone aircraft at a US base, Afghanistan, 2011 As bits and pieces of the Obama administration’s legal justifications for its drone attacks trickle out, what is most striking is their deliberate ambiguity. The recent Justice Department “White Paper,” for example, …

David Isenberg: Harvard Paper on Financial Legacy of Iraq and Afghanistan

  The Financial Legacy of Iraq and Afghanistan: How Wartime Spending Decisions Will Constrain Future National Security Budgets Faculty Research Working Paper Series Linda J. Bilmes, Harvard Kennedy School Abstract: The Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, taken together, will be the most expensive wars in US history – totaling somewhere between $4 to $6 trillion. This …