Threat Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Threats

2004

NO

ThreatBjorgoRoot Causes of Terrorism

2004

US

ThreatKaplanThe Saudi Connection to Terrorism

2004

US

ThreatKnappAl Qaeda and the Mass Media (PSYOP Briefing)

2004

US

ThreatKnappAl Qaeda and the Mass Media (Reference)

2004

US

ThreatKnappDistortion in Islam and Jihad

2004

US

ThreatKnappDiversity in Islam

2006

US

ThreatDalyAl Qaeda Against Saudi Oil

2006

US

ThreatJohnsonBattle of Algiers and Its Lessons

2006

US

ThreatSeagravesGold Warriors: New Epilogue, Further of US Theft of WWII Gold Loot

2006

US

ThreatSeagravesGold Warriors New Chapter Seventeen

2006

US

ThreatSteeleWho Is to Blamce?  The Vice President and Us

2006

US

ThreatSternAl Qaeda Approach to US Muslims

2006

UK

ThreatStoryCrunch Time for CIA, Banks, and Related Thieves of $742 Trillion

2005

US

ThreatEllisScenarios for Next Generation Crises in Latin America

2005

US

ThreatGAOGAO Report: US Not Addressing Islamic Fundamentalism

2005

US

ThreatOSSSomalia Piracy Quick Report

2005

US

ThreatOSSReport on Remote Detonation of Improvised Explosive Devices

2005

US

ThreatOSSPRC Trade in Latin America

2005

US

ThreatRay & GrossThe Perfect Storm

2005

US

ThreatSteeleWorksheet for Book Review on Crossing the Rubicon

2005

US

ThreatSteeleMother Nature as Terrorist

2005

US

ThreatSteele9-11: Who’s To Blame?  One Man’s Opinion

2005

US

ThreatThompsonIs the Terrorism Threat Over-Rated?

2004

US

ThreatDalyGlobalization & National Defense (Ecological Economics)

2004

US

ThreatLouisianaPre-Hurricane Katrina Study and Conclusions

2004

US

ThreatPalmerThe Real Axis of Evil: 44 Dictators

2004

US

ThreatPetersEarly Warning of Disease From Pattern Analysis

2004

US

ThreatSeagraveTranscript of Video on Stolen Gold Held by US Treasury & Citi-Bank

2004

US

ThreatVlahosAttachment to the Muslim Renovatio Memorandum

2004

US

ThreatVlahosThe Muslim Renovatio and U.S. Strategy

2004

US

ThreatVlahosThe Muslims Are Coming

2004

US

ThreatVlahosInsurgency Within Islam

2003

US

ThreatDanzipCountering Traumatic Attacks

2003

PRC

ThreatOSSPRC Treaty & Trade Penetration of Latin America

2002

US

ThreatEmerson & SteeleAmerican Jihad Map

2002

US

ThreatSteeleACFR, 19 Cities: 9-11, U.S. Intelligence, & the Real World

2000

US

ThreatSteeleGeorgetown/AWC: Non-Traditional Threats

1998

US

ThreatSteeleTAKEDOWN: Targets, Tools, & Technocracy

1994

US

ThreatSteele6th National Threat Symposium: New Directions in Information Sharing

2005

NGO

ThreatNGOChanging Face of Global Violence

2005

NGO

ThreatNGOHuman Security Audit

2004

US

ThreatPeltonRobert Young Pelton on Dangerous World

2004

US

ThreatSteeleThree Book Review Relevant to Global War on Terror (GWOT)

2003

US

ThreatCopelandAnalysis of the New Paradigm for Terrorism

2003

US

ThreatManwaringStreet Gangs: New Urban Insurgency

2003

US

ThreatManwaringWar & Conflict: Six Generations

2003

US

ThreatPeltonSummary of Presentation on World’s Most Dangerous Places

2002

US

ThreatBettsThe Next Intelligence Failure: The Limits of Prevention

2002

NL

ThreatJongmanWorld Conflict and Human Rights Map 2001-2002

2002

US

ThreatWheatonTransitions from Authoritarian Rule: A Model

2002

US

ThreatWheatonVirtual Afghanistan: Modeling a Transition from Authoritarian Rule

2001

US

ThreatGodsonGovernments and Gangs

2001

US

ThreatHeidenrichEarly Warning & Complex Monitoring of Ethnic Genocide (Slides)

2001

US

ThreatHeidenrichEarly Warning & Complex Monitoring of Ethnic Genocide (Text)

1998

US

ThreatTransnational Enemies: Threats Without Names

1998

US

ThreatGlaebusMetaphors & Modern Threats: Biological, Computer, Cognitive Viruses

1997

US

ThreatFialkaWar by Other Means: Economic Espionage In (Against) America

1997

US

ThreatSchwartauInformation Warfare: The Weapons of the Information Age

1997

US

ThreatTenneyCyber-Law and Cyber-Crime: Spamming Methods and Costs

1996

US

ThreatKeuhlSchool of Information Warfare Threat and Strategy: Shifting Paradigms

1996

US

ThreatO’MalleyCountering the Business Intelligence Threat

1996

US

ThreatStrassmannU.S. Knowledge Assets: The Choice Target for Information Crime

1996

US

ThreatWinklerElectronic Industrial Espionage: Defining Ground Zero

1994

US

ThreatWhitney-SmithRefugees: Weapon of the Post Cold War World–Counter Offensive: IW

Government Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Government
Archives 1996-2006
Archives 1996-2006

2006

SA

GovernmentYekeloAfrican Early Warning

2002

US

GovernmentFSMOForeign Military Studies Office

2000

US

GovernmentSteeleSpies and Secrecy in an Open World

1999

US

GovernmentCoileInformation Overlay for Preparing & Coping with Local Disasters

1999

CA

GovernmentGeorgeOSINT: Islamic Unrest in China

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichGenocide Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichSample Daily Briefing on Genocide

1999

UN

GovernmentMarksProposal for Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSProliferation Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSSample Daily Briefing on Proliferation

1999

NL

GovernmentReservedOSINT: Foundation for Co-Ordination and Information Sharing

1999

US

GovernmentSanzNuclear Terrorism Literature Since 1992

1999

US

GovernmentSovereignInformation Sharing for the Lower End of the Spectrum

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleRelevant Information: New Approach to Collection, Sharing, Analysis

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleWeb-Based Concept for a Global Information Sharing Environment

1999

CA

GovernmentStout & QuigginOSINT: High Resolution Imagery for Anyone

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOptimizing Open Source Information Sharing in Australia

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOSINT in Australia: The Report

1998

NL

GovernmentBVDAnnual Report of the National Security Service

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxBelgian Observations on Intelligence Oversight

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxReport of the Intelligence Oversight Committee

1998

FR

GovernmentClercEconomic Intelligence

1998

US

GovernmentDearthGovernment and the Information Marketplace

1998

US

GovernmentHughesFBIS 1995-1998: Transition and Transformation

1998

US

GovernmentLeeLetter to HPSCI Urging Attention to Commercial Mapping Technology

1998

SE

GovernmentLeijonhelmOSINT  and Information Sharing Between Government & Industry

1998

S. Africa

GovernmentMtiOSINT, the African Renaissance, and Sustainable Development

1998

GE

GovernmentSchlickmanEnsuring Trust and Security in Electronic Communications

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleINFORMATION PEACEKEEPING: The Purest Form of War

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleStrategic Issues in National and Regional Intelligence & Security

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleClandestine Human Intelligence Successes, Failures, Possibilities

1998

US

GovernmentSteele (in French)Strategic Intelligence in the USA: Myth or Reality?

1997

UK

GovernmentAndrewPresidents, Secret Intelligence, and Open Sources

1997

US

GovernmentCarrollCENDI Information Managers Group

1997

US

GovernmentHaakonCommercial Imagery Options and Trade-Offs

1997

US

GovernmentHodgeCENDI: Help!  Impact of the Internet on the Consumer

1997

US

GovernmentJohnsonNational Technical Information Center

1997

US/UK

GovernmentKerr & HermanDoes the Intelligence Community Have a Future? (Two Items in One)

1997

US

GovernmentRobideauDepartment of Energy Technical Information Program

1996

US

GovernmentKalil (NEC)Leveraging Cyberspace

1996

US

GovernmentLucas (COSPO)The Open Source Information System

1995

US

GovernmentMarkowitzCommunity Open Source Program Office (COSPO), Report on the Program

1995

US

GovernmentPetersINADEQUATE ANSWERS: Bureaucracy, Wealth, & Mediocrity (US IC)

1994

US

GovernmentCarrollHarsh Realities: S&T Acquisition Costs, Obstacles, and Results

1994

AU

GovernmentChantlerProducing Intelligence in Australia: H National Open Source Foundation?

1994

US

GovernmentDevostDigital Threat: United States National Security and Computers

1994

US

GovernmentWienerThe Intelligence Community: An Outsider’s View

1993

SE

GovernmentHeden & DedijerThe State of the National Intelligence and Security Community of Sweden

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Slides)

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Text)

1992

US

GovernmentJohnsonNTIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentKeyworthGovernment as a Customer in the Digital Age

1992

US

GovernmentMcConnellPlanned Revisions to Circular No. A-130

1992

US

GovernmentMolholmThe CENDI Paradigm: How Some Federal Managers Have Organized

1992

US

GovernmentMortimerLC FRD Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentRiddleFBIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentSteeleInformation Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

GovernmentStudemanTeaching the Giant to Dance

Review: How to Prevent Genocide–A Guide for Policymakers, Scholars, and the Concerned Citizen

5 Star, Atrocities & Genocide

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, Compelling, Practical, Essential and Unnerving,

December 10, 2001
John G. Heidenrich
The author of this book not only completed graduate work with a direct focus on genocide, but spent over a year supporting the Office of War Crimes at the Department of State, each day creating an open source intelligence report on genocide-at the time he was engaged in this activity, there were eighteen (18) such active genocidal movements going on around the world.This is a brilliant and compelling book that is also practical and essential for anyone who desires to understand the complete inadequacy of the diplomats, the policymakers, the media, and the intelligence communities. It is unnerving in its calm and reasoned detailing of how genocide can take place, its survey of the millions upon millions of post-WWII holocausts taking place today–as the media and policymakers ignore these realities.

Citizen-voters, in my view, will benefit considerably from this book because it will help them understand that there are three worlds out there, and we as a nation are not dealing well with two of the three–the most dangerous two. There is the world of well-fed diplomats and businessman, traveling and negotiating in their warm safe buffer zones. There is the real world as experienced by normal people, many of whom are oppressed and poor and feel helpless in the face of dictatorial regimes and local warlords who may do as they wish absent the rule of law. And then there is the world of genocide, an underworld of such horrific pervasive violence and inhuman brutality that one can only wonder if we are all guilty of mass insanity for turning our backs on this murder of millions.

The author is a world-class scholar and ardent champion for informing the public and achieving informed policy in this vital area, and I can only hope that serious people put some money behind his thinking.
Vote on Review
Vote on Review