Government Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Government
Archives 1996-2006
Archives 1996-2006

2006

SA

GovernmentYekeloAfrican Early Warning

2002

US

GovernmentFSMOForeign Military Studies Office

2000

US

GovernmentSteeleSpies and Secrecy in an Open World

1999

US

GovernmentCoileInformation Overlay for Preparing & Coping with Local Disasters

1999

CA

GovernmentGeorgeOSINT: Islamic Unrest in China

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichGenocide Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichSample Daily Briefing on Genocide

1999

UN

GovernmentMarksProposal for Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSProliferation Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSSample Daily Briefing on Proliferation

1999

NL

GovernmentReservedOSINT: Foundation for Co-Ordination and Information Sharing

1999

US

GovernmentSanzNuclear Terrorism Literature Since 1992

1999

US

GovernmentSovereignInformation Sharing for the Lower End of the Spectrum

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleRelevant Information: New Approach to Collection, Sharing, Analysis

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleWeb-Based Concept for a Global Information Sharing Environment

1999

CA

GovernmentStout & QuigginOSINT: High Resolution Imagery for Anyone

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOptimizing Open Source Information Sharing in Australia

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOSINT in Australia: The Report

1998

NL

GovernmentBVDAnnual Report of the National Security Service

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxBelgian Observations on Intelligence Oversight

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxReport of the Intelligence Oversight Committee

1998

FR

GovernmentClercEconomic Intelligence

1998

US

GovernmentDearthGovernment and the Information Marketplace

1998

US

GovernmentHughesFBIS 1995-1998: Transition and Transformation

1998

US

GovernmentLeeLetter to HPSCI Urging Attention to Commercial Mapping Technology

1998

SE

GovernmentLeijonhelmOSINT  and Information Sharing Between Government & Industry

1998

S. Africa

GovernmentMtiOSINT, the African Renaissance, and Sustainable Development

1998

GE

GovernmentSchlickmanEnsuring Trust and Security in Electronic Communications

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleINFORMATION PEACEKEEPING: The Purest Form of War

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleStrategic Issues in National and Regional Intelligence & Security

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleClandestine Human Intelligence Successes, Failures, Possibilities

1998

US

GovernmentSteele (in French)Strategic Intelligence in the USA: Myth or Reality?

1997

UK

GovernmentAndrewPresidents, Secret Intelligence, and Open Sources

1997

US

GovernmentCarrollCENDI Information Managers Group

1997

US

GovernmentHaakonCommercial Imagery Options and Trade-Offs

1997

US

GovernmentHodgeCENDI: Help!  Impact of the Internet on the Consumer

1997

US

GovernmentJohnsonNational Technical Information Center

1997

US/UK

GovernmentKerr & HermanDoes the Intelligence Community Have a Future? (Two Items in One)

1997

US

GovernmentRobideauDepartment of Energy Technical Information Program

1996

US

GovernmentKalil (NEC)Leveraging Cyberspace

1996

US

GovernmentLucas (COSPO)The Open Source Information System

1995

US

GovernmentMarkowitzCommunity Open Source Program Office (COSPO), Report on the Program

1995

US

GovernmentPetersINADEQUATE ANSWERS: Bureaucracy, Wealth, & Mediocrity (US IC)

1994

US

GovernmentCarrollHarsh Realities: S&T Acquisition Costs, Obstacles, and Results

1994

AU

GovernmentChantlerProducing Intelligence in Australia: H National Open Source Foundation?

1994

US

GovernmentDevostDigital Threat: United States National Security and Computers

1994

US

GovernmentWienerThe Intelligence Community: An Outsider’s View

1993

SE

GovernmentHeden & DedijerThe State of the National Intelligence and Security Community of Sweden

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Slides)

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Text)

1992

US

GovernmentJohnsonNTIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentKeyworthGovernment as a Customer in the Digital Age

1992

US

GovernmentMcConnellPlanned Revisions to Circular No. A-130

1992

US

GovernmentMolholmThe CENDI Paradigm: How Some Federal Managers Have Organized

1992

US

GovernmentMortimerLC FRD Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentRiddleFBIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentSteeleInformation Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

GovernmentStudemanTeaching the Giant to Dance

Review: The Uses of the University: Fifth Edition

5 Star, Education (Universities)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Fifth Edition, Still the Best in Class,

June 18, 2003
Clark Kerr
Of the three books read and reviewed on the role of the university within a nation, this is the best, with Derek Bok’s volume on universities in the marketplace being the runner up.With a new preface written in 2001, and a pattern over the course of five editions of each time updating, correcting, and commenting on differences between past predictions and actual outcomes, this book appears to be the best available on this topic.

The author is alarmed by the possibilities that universities, which were nurtured by post-World War II federal funding and state funding that is now vanishing, could begin to fail in almost catastrophic terms. Between aging and unrepentent faculty, the vanishing of liberal arts (or even quality education) for undergraduates, and the prostitution of graduate education to commercial purposes, there does appear to be a crisis.

After noting that America appears to spend more on prisons than on universities, the author makes several recommendations, all of which appear sensible. They include a new emphasis on university support to primary and secondary education, a rationalization of information technology within communities to better link businesses with members of the university family, the exploration of distance learning alternatives (as much to reach the drop-outs inexpensively as for any other reason), and the resurrection of mid-career education or continuing education as a mainstream expectation for personal as well as business advancement.

The author, who clearly has a very strong ethical perspective, quotes Alfred North Whitehead, who concluded that any society that “does not value trained intelligence is doomed” and adds his own view, that “the university that does not fully dedicate itself above all else to the continuing advancement of trained intelligence is also doomed.”

This is a really fine book that should be in the library of anyone seeking to understand “national intelligence” as Thomas Jefferson understood it when he said “A Nation’s best defense is an educated citizenry.”

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