Marcus Aurelius: CSIS Rambles on US Security Policy

07 Other Atrocities, 10 Security, 11 Society, Cultural Intelligence
Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Introduction | The Deterioration of Government John j. Hamre

PART 1: GETTING OUR HOUSE IN ORDER
Can We Rebuild a National Security Consensus? Kathleen h. Hicks
The Snowden Effect: Can We Undo the Damage to American Power? James a. Lewis
What Battlefield Lessons Have We Learned from 12 Years of War? Maren Leed
What Has Syria Taught Us about the Right Time to Use Force? Clark a. Murdock
How Can We Develop a Sustainable Resource Strategy for Defense? David j. Berteau

PART 2: THE CHANGING ORDER IN THE MIDDLE EAST
What Should the United States and its Allies Expect from the Middle East? Anthony h. Cordesman
What Should the Middle East Expect from the United States and its Allies? Jon b. Alterman
Is Russia Back as a Power in the Middle East? Andrew c. Kuchins
Can We Stop Violent Extremism from Going Mainstream in North Africa? Haim Malka

PART 3: SUSTAINING THE RE BALANCE
Should We Change Our Security Approach in Asia? A conversation with Michael j. Green , Victor Cha, and Christopher k. Johnson moderated by Zack Cooper
How Important Is TPP to Our Asia Policy? A conversation with Ernest z. Bower ,
Matthew Goodman , and Scott Miller moderated by Murray Hiebert
How Will the Shifting Energy Landscape in Asia Impact Geopolitics? Sarah o. Ladislaw
How Should We Address Nuclear Risks in Asia? Sharon Squassoni

PART 4: NONTRADITIONAL SECURITY APPROACHES
Are There Opportunities to Bolster Regional Security Cooperation? A conversation with Heather a. Conley, Jennifer G. Cooke , Carl Meacham , aram nerguizian, and Ralph a. Cossa moderated by Samuel Brannen
What Can Civilian Power Accomplish in Foreign Crises? A conversation with j. Stephen Morrison, Daniel f. Runde, and Johanna Nesseth tuttle moderated by Robert d. Lamb
Can We Adapt to the Changing Nature of Power in the 21st Century? Juan Zarate

PDF (76 Pages): (U) CSIS 2014 Global Forecast

Phi Beta Iota: CSIS means well, but it does not know what it does not know, and that makes its “analysis” inherently unreliable.  By this point in time CSIS could — if it wanted to — have a holistic analytic model (ten threats, twelve policies, eight demographics), and also have embraced a cradle to grave true cost economic methodology. This is a mixed group of essays, some of which are outrageously out of touch with both ethics and reality.