Mongoose: Is Donald Trump a Naked Lying Fraud? The Ghost Author of “The Art of the Deal” Tells All

Mongoose

Mongoose

Kudos to Jane Mayer of the New Yorker for teasing out this provocative story.

Donald Trump’s Ghostwriter Tells All

“The Art of the Deal” made America see Trump as a charmer with an unfailing knack for business. Tony Schwartz helped create that myth—and regrets it.

“I put lipstick on a pig,” [Tony Schwartz] said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Jul 26

CounterPunch: Military Coup in USA?

counterpunch squareCould a Military Coup Happen Here?

According to a September 2015 poll by YouGov, nearly one-third of respondents (29 percent) “could imagine a situation in which they would support the military seizing control of the federal government.” That number went up to 43 percent in a hypothetical situation in which the government was beginning to violate the U.S. constitution.

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Jul 26

Stephen E. Arnold: Pirate Libraries Challenge Elsevier and Thomson Reuters to Liberate Knowledge for Destitute Scholars

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Avast: Pirate Libraries

They are called “pirate libraries,” but one would be better-served envisioning Robin Hood than Blackbeard.  Atlas Obscura takes a look at these floaters of scientific-journal copyrights in, “The Rise of Pirate Libraries.” These are not physical libraries, but virtual ones, where researchers and other curious folks can study articles otherwise accessible only through expensive scientific journal paywalls. Reporter Sarah Laskow writes:

“The creators of these repositories are a small group who try to keep a low profile, since distributing copyrighted material in this way is illegal. Many of them are academics. The largest pirate libraries have come from Russia’s cultural orbit, but the documents they collect are used by people around the world, in countries both wealthy and poor. Pirate libraries have become so popular that in 2015, Elsevier, one of the largest academic publishers in America, went to court to try to shut down two of the most popular, Sci-Hub and Library Genesis.

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Jul 26