Penguin: Open Source Toolbox for Studying Earth

Hardware

An Open Source Toolbox For Studying The Earth

Fully understanding the planet’s complex ecosystem takes data, and lots of it. Unfortunately, the ability to collect detailed environmental data on a large scale with any sort of accuracy has traditionally been something that only the government or well-funded institutions have been capable of. Building and deploying the sensors necessary to cover large areas or remote locations simply wasn’t something the individual could realistically do.

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Penguin: Open Source Data Storage

Architecture, Data, Hardware, Innovation, Software

Solving the storage dilemma: Is open source the key?

One answer to solving the storage issue is software-defined storage (SDS) which separates the physical storage hardware (data plane) from the data storage management logic or ‘intelligence’ (control plane). Needing no proprietary hardware components, SDS is the perfect cost-effective solution for enterprises as IT can use off-the-shelf, low-cost commodity hardware which is robust and flexible.

Sepp Hasslberger: 3D Printer Builds Houses from Mud

Design, Economics/True Cost, Hardware, Innovation, Manufacturing, Materials
Sepp Hasslberger
Sepp Hasslberger

Constructing houses out of mud with a 3D printer … this looks like a great advance for getting building costs down to what can be afforded locally just about anywhere!

The world’s largest Delta 3D printer creates nearly zero-cost homes out of mud

The future of affordable (and sustainable) housing may lie with 3D printing. The World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) has unveiled the world’s largest delta-style 3D printer, which can build full-size buildings out of mud and clay for nearly zero cost. The massive BigDelta printer stands 12 meters tall (40 feet), and it’s nearly completed its first house at a cost of just 48 euros so far.  Read more, watch video, see compelling photographs.

Sepp Hasslberger: Open Modular Hardware

Hardware
Sepp Hasslberger
Sepp Hasslberger

How to localise manufacturing – go modular and build for re-use…

How to Make Everything Ourselves: Open Modular Hardware

Reverting to traditional handicrafts is one way to sabotage the throwaway society. In this article, we discuss another possibility: the design of modular consumer products, whose parts and components could be re-used for the design of other products. Initiatives like OpenStructures, Grid Beam, and Contraptor combine the modularity of systems like LEGO, Meccano and Erector with the collaborative power of digital success stories like Wikipedia, Linux or WordPress.

Facebook Open Source Hardware $140B and Rising

Hardware
Mark Dixon
Mark Dixon

How Facebook is eating the $140 billion hardware market

It started out as a controversial idea inside Facebook. In four short years, it has turned the $141 billion data-center computer-hardware industry on its head. Facebook’s extraordinary Open Compute Project is doing for hardware what Linux, Android, and many other popular products did for software: making it free and “open source.”

Sepp Hasslberger: MacroFab – The Open Source Hardware Factory

Hardware
Sepp Hasslberger
Sepp Hasslberger

This factory is collecting together and testing all the technologies needed for future widespread local manufacturing of … everything.

Making Hardware Is a Total Pain. But Not in This Factory

EXTRACT

What Church really wanted was for manufacturing to work more like cloud computing, where you can simply request the resources you need through the web. He wanted to be able to upload his designs to a manufacturer, get a quote automatically, and, when the time comes, order a batch of prototypes with a push of a button, instead of having to spend hours and hours going over spreadsheets with sales reps. That didn’t exist, so, along with electrical engineer Parker Dillmann, he started a factory called MacroFab that lets hardware designers do just that.

Worth a Look: Open Source Ecology

Access, Architecture, Crowd-Sourcing, Design, Economics/True Cost, Hardware, Innovation, Knowledge, Manufacturing, Resilience, Science
Click for Wiki
Click for Wiki

Open Source Ecology is accelerating the growth of the next economy – the Open Source Economy – an economy that optimizes both production and distribution – while promoting environmental regeneration and social justice. We are building the Global Village Construction Set. This is a high-performance, modular, do-it-yourself, low-cost platform – that allows for the easy fabrication of the 50 different industrial machines that it takes – to build a small, sustainable civilization with modern comforts.

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Jean Lievens: Makerspace the Next Open Source Frontier

Hardware
Jean Lievens
Jean Lievens

The makerspace is the next open source frontier

EXTRACT

In this brave new world of heterogeneous projects that combine hardware, software, printed, cloud, and other pieces, we are going to see an cacophony of different tools for building these different parts of an idea and project. We have GitHub for collaborating around code, Thingiverse for 3D models, Trello for project management and coordination, Moqups and Balsamiq for user interface design, specific toolkits for building drivers and integrating with sensors, and more.

Jean Lievens: 3D Printing Market — and Superficial True Costs — Rising

Economics/True Cost, Hardware
Jean Lievens
Jean Lievens

3D Printing Market Tops $3.3 Billion, Expands by 34% in 2014

If you’re wondering about the health of the market for 3D printers and 3D printing technology, put your thoughts at ease.  Market research firm Canalys says almost 133,000 3D printers were shipped around the world during 2014, and that represents a whopping 68% increase over the calendar year 2013.

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Jean Lievens: Open Networking In, What Next?

Design, Hardware
Jean Lievens
Jean Lievens

Now that networking’s open, what’s next?

Open-source hardware and software from Facebook’s Open Compute Project offer new options, but most enterprises won’t use them for years

. . . . . . .

Skorupa expects a third of all IT shops — including the Web-scale players — to adopt open networking. Another third will stick with the tried and true, and the other third may go either way, he said. Read more.