Journal: MI-5 Book by Christopher Andrew

10 Security, Law Enforcement

Badly marketed on Amazon by a publisher that evidently does not really care for the future of the book, we do what we can to highlight the availability of this new book by Christopher Andrew, In Defence of the Realm, an authorized but not controlled examination of the history of MI-5 (internal security) in the United Kingdom.  A short article on the book:

Defence of the Realm: author marks 100 years of MI5 with official history

Within the USA there has never been a proper review that we know of with respect to internal security, although there have been a number of books on the failures of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), a few of which we list below.  The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been an abysmal expensive failure in all respects, substituting money, technology, and butts in seats for thinking, education, and common sense.

Continue reading “Journal: MI-5 Book by Christopher Andrew”

Government Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Government
Archives 1996-2006
Archives 1996-2006

2006

SA

GovernmentYekeloAfrican Early Warning

2002

US

GovernmentFSMOForeign Military Studies Office

2000

US

GovernmentSteeleSpies and Secrecy in an Open World

1999

US

GovernmentCoileInformation Overlay for Preparing & Coping with Local Disasters

1999

CA

GovernmentGeorgeOSINT: Islamic Unrest in China

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichGenocide Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentHeidenrichSample Daily Briefing on Genocide

1999

UN

GovernmentMarksProposal for Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSProliferation Web Sites (At the Time)

1999

US

GovernmentOSSSample Daily Briefing on Proliferation

1999

NL

GovernmentReservedOSINT: Foundation for Co-Ordination and Information Sharing

1999

US

GovernmentSanzNuclear Terrorism Literature Since 1992

1999

US

GovernmentSovereignInformation Sharing for the Lower End of the Spectrum

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleRelevant Information: New Approach to Collection, Sharing, Analysis

1999

US

GovernmentSteeleWeb-Based Concept for a Global Information Sharing Environment

1999

CA

GovernmentStout & QuigginOSINT: High Resolution Imagery for Anyone

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOptimizing Open Source Information Sharing in Australia

1999

AU

GovernmentWingOSINT in Australia: The Report

1998

NL

GovernmentBVDAnnual Report of the National Security Service

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxBelgian Observations on Intelligence Oversight

1998

BE

GovernmentCaillouxReport of the Intelligence Oversight Committee

1998

FR

GovernmentClercEconomic Intelligence

1998

US

GovernmentDearthGovernment and the Information Marketplace

1998

US

GovernmentHughesFBIS 1995-1998: Transition and Transformation

1998

US

GovernmentLeeLetter to HPSCI Urging Attention to Commercial Mapping Technology

1998

SE

GovernmentLeijonhelmOSINT  and Information Sharing Between Government & Industry

1998

S. Africa

GovernmentMtiOSINT, the African Renaissance, and Sustainable Development

1998

GE

GovernmentSchlickmanEnsuring Trust and Security in Electronic Communications

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleINFORMATION PEACEKEEPING: The Purest Form of War

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleStrategic Issues in National and Regional Intelligence & Security

1998

US

GovernmentSteeleClandestine Human Intelligence Successes, Failures, Possibilities

1998

US

GovernmentSteele (in French)Strategic Intelligence in the USA: Myth or Reality?

1997

UK

GovernmentAndrewPresidents, Secret Intelligence, and Open Sources

1997

US

GovernmentCarrollCENDI Information Managers Group

1997

US

GovernmentHaakonCommercial Imagery Options and Trade-Offs

1997

US

GovernmentHodgeCENDI: Help!  Impact of the Internet on the Consumer

1997

US

GovernmentJohnsonNational Technical Information Center

1997

US/UK

GovernmentKerr & HermanDoes the Intelligence Community Have a Future? (Two Items in One)

1997

US

GovernmentRobideauDepartment of Energy Technical Information Program

1996

US

GovernmentKalil (NEC)Leveraging Cyberspace

1996

US

GovernmentLucas (COSPO)The Open Source Information System

1995

US

GovernmentMarkowitzCommunity Open Source Program Office (COSPO), Report on the Program

1995

US

GovernmentPetersINADEQUATE ANSWERS: Bureaucracy, Wealth, & Mediocrity (US IC)

1994

US

GovernmentCarrollHarsh Realities: S&T Acquisition Costs, Obstacles, and Results

1994

AU

GovernmentChantlerProducing Intelligence in Australia: H National Open Source Foundation?

1994

US

GovernmentDevostDigital Threat: United States National Security and Computers

1994

US

GovernmentWienerThe Intelligence Community: An Outsider’s View

1993

SE

GovernmentHeden & DedijerThe State of the National Intelligence and Security Community of Sweden

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Slides)

1992

US

GovernmentCotterNASA Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities (Text)

1992

US

GovernmentJohnsonNTIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentKeyworthGovernment as a Customer in the Digital Age

1992

US

GovernmentMcConnellPlanned Revisions to Circular No. A-130

1992

US

GovernmentMolholmThe CENDI Paradigm: How Some Federal Managers Have Organized

1992

US

GovernmentMortimerLC FRD Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentRiddleFBIS Open Source Intelligence Requirements & Capabilities

1992

US

GovernmentSteeleInformation Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

GovernmentStudemanTeaching the Giant to Dance

Review: The World Was Going Our Way–The KGB and the Battle for the Third World (v. 2) (Hardcover)

5 Star, Intelligence (Government/Secret)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary largely for showing contractors as the weak link ,

September 28, 2005
Christopher Andrew
This is, like the first book, an extraordinary piece of scholarship. While it can be tedious in both its detail and in the drollness of the “accomplishments” that enjoyed so much Politburo attention and funding, it joins books such as Derek Leebaert’s The Fifty-Year Wound: How America’s Cold War Victory Has Shaped Our World in documenting the insanity and waste that characterized much of the so-called “secret wars” between the US Intelligence Community (within which the CIA is a $3 billion a year runt against the larger defense budget approaching $50 billion a year) and the KGB and GRU.

For those who have the patience or speed to get through this entire book, the single most important revelation and documentation concerns the ease with which the Russians were able to recruit traitors within the US defense community contractors. Ralph Peters has written about this in New Glory : Expanding America’s Global Supremacy but speaks mostly of legal treason–corruption and waste. This book carefully addresses the sad reality that DoD is totally penetrated by foreign spies (one would add, Third World and allied spies including France, Germany, and Israel, never mind China and Iran) via the contracting community.

One day someone will do a careful calibration of both the good and the bad of secret intelligence. When that day comes, this book will be as good a place as any with which to start.

Best General Couonterintelligence Books:
Traitors Among Us: Inside the Spy Catcher’s World
Merchants of Treason America’s Secrets for Sale from the Pueblo to the Present

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Vote on Review

Review: For the President’s Eyes Only–Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush

5 Star, Executive (Partisan Failure, Reform), Intelligence (Government/Secret)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars For Presidents, Cabinet Members, Commanders, & Senior Staff,

January 10, 2001
Christopher Andrew
“Over the past two centuries only four American presidents-Washington, Eisenhower, Kennedy (briefly), and Bush-have shown a real flair for intelligence.” This 660-page book documents this assessment, and ends with the conclusion “The presidents in the twenty-first century, like their Cold War predecessors, will continue to find an enormously expensive global intelligence system both fallible and indispensable.” His general findings in the conclusion are instructive: presidents have tended to have exaggerated expectations of intelligence, and have frequently overestimated the secret power that covert action might put at their command. For all that failed, both in intelligence not getting it right and presidents not listening when it did, intelligence undeniably helped stabilize the Cold War and avoid many confrontations. This book is extremely relevant to the emerging discussion, in 2001, about the need to depoliticize the position of the Director of Central Intelligence, and perhaps to consider a new National Security Act of 2001.
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Vote on Review

Review: Comrade Kryuchkov’s Instructions–Top Secret Files on KGB Foreign Operations, 1975-1985

3 Star, Intelligence (Government/Secret)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

3.0 out of 5 stars Core Reference for the Professional Researcher,

April 8, 2000
Christopher Andrew
Imagine the CIA clandestine mentality and U.S. bureaucracy, as operated by a Soviet-style controlled regime. This is an eye-glazing but very professionally put together testimonial to the fact that much of what the KGB did was pedestrian, pointless, very expensive, and as weak on understanding foreign countries as the US.
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Vote on Review