Journal: Librarians and The Accessibility Paradox

Academia, Analysis, Budgets & Funding, Collective Intelligence, Methods & Process
Full Source Online
Full Source Online

Fortunately, most librarians have gotten used to the fact that the Internet is a tremendous boon to researchers and that free information is a fantastic idea. Sure, we haven’t yet reallocated our organizational resources to recognize this fact—our staff time is much more likely to be devoted to acquiring and messing about with purchased information than in making good information from our archives, our labs, or the web more easily available.  [Emphasis added.]

Barbara Fister is a librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN, a contributor to ACRLog, and an author of crime fiction. Her next mystery, Through the Cracks, will be published by Minotaur Books in 2010.
Barbara Fister

We need to separate our value—the way we curate information, champion its availability in the face of intolerance of unpopular ideas and economic disparity, and create conditions for learning how to find and use good information—from the amount of money it takes to acquire stuff on the not-so-open market. We need to be quite clear that good information is good information, no matter how it’s funded. And we need to find creative ways to partner with those who add value to information and find sustainable models for the editorial work that can make good academic work better.

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Journal: MILNET Flags Fighting Global Warming With CIA?

10 Security, Earth Intelligence, Government

Full Story Online
Full Story Online

Some say security fears are counterproductive

By Bryan Bender

WASHINGTON – Melting ice caps. Drought. Spreading disease. US defense planners view global climate change as a national security threat because it could create millions of new refugees and intensify conflicts over resources.

. . . . . . .

A new debate is unfolding over whether linking climate change too closely with security planning will create a self-fulfilling prophecy, running the risk that the United States will rely too heavily on its armed forces to deal with global problems.

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Academic Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Academia
Archive 1992-2006
Archive 1992-2006

2003

US

Academic Andregg State of the Academic Tribe (Slides)

2003

US

Academic Andregg State of the Academic Tribe (Text)

2003

US

Academic Pak & Zadanowicz Estimate of Lost Tax Revenues (Text)

2003

US

Academic Pak & Zadanowicz Transfer Pricing Import-Export Tax Avoidance Fraud ($50B/Year in US)

1999

US

Academic Lepingwell Center for Nonproliferation Studies, MIIS (Briefing Slides)

1999

UK

Academic Ostle et al Oxford Analytica Contact Information of Special Study on Islam

1998

FR

Academic Baumard Learned Nations & Knowledge Strategies

1998

FR

Academic Bonthous Culture: The Missing Intelligence Variable

1997

GE

Academic Mayer-Kress The World Brain

1995

US

Academic Bender The Information Highway: Will Librarians Be Left by the Side of the Road?

1995`

US

Academic Heibel Research and Intelligence Analyst Program (RIAP) at Mercyhurst College

1994

US

Academic Kahin New Laws for Government & Business Operations in Cyberspace

1994

US

Academic Liddy An Intelligent Digital Librarian

1993

US

Academic Etheredge National Knowledge Strategies  in the IC and the Library of the Future

1993

US

Academic Jacso A Proposal for Database ‘Nutrition and Ingredient’ Labeling

1993

US

Academic Toffler Keynote Address to OSS ’93 (Transcript)

1995 Bender (US) The Information Highway: Will Librarians Be Left by the Side of the Road?

Academia, Commerce, Government, Historic Contributions, Law Enforcement
Special Libraries Association
Special Libraries Association
David R. Bender
David R. Bender

In 1986, Project GEORGE (Smiley) in the CIA’s Office of Information Technology discovered that computers had been designed without ever talking to librarians.  There were created as unstructured bit buckets.  It turns out that in the analog period, structure and the Dewey decimal system and humanly-constructed taxonomies were vitally important if one was to archive and retrieve knowledge within the limits of the individual human.  During the middle period, which is STILL IN PROGRESS, computers have failed to get a grip on unstructured information.  As Stephen E. Arnold and others have documented, electronic search yields less than 10% of what is online (apart from deep web not covered by any of the 75 search engines, there are C drives and peripheral drives that have not been indexed).  Although David Weinberg is correct in his book Everything is Miscellaneous, and the digital world opens the propect for infinitely sharing information while retaining the original, and for creating infinite wealth by eliminating information asymmetries and data pathologies that favor the few at the expense of the many, there is no single government, corporation, organization, or collective other than Earth Intelligence Network and its affiliated society, Phi Beta Iota, that is actually committed to realizing the full potential of humans as H. G. Wells, Pierre Tielhard de Chardin, Stewart Brand, Kevin Kelly, and others have envisioned: as the World Brain within Earth Game, all humans, all minds, all the time.  See the 2009 article on Human Intelligence by clicking on the icon below.

HUMINT 21
HUMINT 21