Review (Guest): The Ultimate Resource 2

5 Star, Change & Innovation, Education (Universities), Environment (Solutions), Future, Information Society, Intelligence (Wealth of Networks), Nature, Diet, Memetics, Design, Survival & Sustainment, Water, Energy, Oil, Scarcity
Amazon Page

Julian Lincoln Simon

5.0 out of 5 stars The doomslayer falls,April 4, 1998

By A Customer

On Sunday, February 8th, psychologist and economist Julian L. Simon succumbed to a heart attack in Maryland. It is difficult to overstate the damage his death will cause the world debate on overpopulation, natural resources, and the environment. Dr. Simon’s prolific and energetic mind gave rise to fourteen books and countless papers and lectures, dedicated to overthrowing the dogma that underlies so much of today’s environmental discourse.

Simon, still considered a maverick after thirty years of relentless data-gathering, impeccable empirical work, and well-thought out conclusions, questioned the unquestionable. He maintained that the earth is in good shape by every conceivable measure, and that the environmental situation continues to improve each year. Every index of human happiness – food prices, net income, infant mortality, life expectancy, disease rates – has steadily improved. He documented those claims with reams of data, culminating in his 1996 tour de force The State of Humanity. It is absolutely comprehensive, and contains enough obscure data to make the most jaded Trivial Pursuit fan squirm (if you ever want to read about the average lower-class Brazilian’s annual starch intake, look no further).

Continue reading “Review (Guest): The Ultimate Resource 2”

Event Report: 20 Nov 09 NYC Counterinsurgency–America’s Strategic Burden Featuring Nagl, Kilcullen, Sheehan, Bergen, Coll Among Others

Memoranda

COIN20 Trip Report
COIN20 Trip Report

21 November 2009

Memorandum of Transmittal by Robert David STEELE Vivas

Subject:  Counterinsurgency Conference Overview

Mr. Jason Liszkiewicz, Executive Director of the Earth Intelligence Network (EIN) and resident in NYC, attended the 20 November 2009 conference on counterinsurgency (speakers identified on page two), and provided me with the notes on pages 3-9.  Below is my own exploitation of these notes.

IGNORANT US POLICYMAKERS.  We have policymakers with crippling illusions about how the world is—worst ever—people in policy positions do not understand the problems they are making policy on—Congress is unsophisticated about Afghanistan; Washington-area decision-makers vastly misunderstand the enemy—Taliban is a super-bug  adapting super-fast.  This is NOT about Al Qaeda having a home base.  Congress lacks next of kin engaged.

CORRUPT AFGHAN OFFICIALS. Afghan government officials own 32% of the Palm Islands in Dubai—election was “industrial-strength fraud”—tsunami of cash (US, Saudi, others) drives corruption.  NOTE:  No Afghans on any of the panels.

US LACKS AREA KNOWLEDGE & STRATEGY. We really do not “get” the Afghanistan-Pakistan-India  context, detail, etcetera.  US “strategy” of “ten cities” is a mirror of the Soviet strategy before defeat.  Doctrine is not a substitute for Strategy.  Water (Indus River) is central to Pakistan-India relationship (Kashmir is about water).  Question NOT being asked: how do we do this without a US ground presence?  “Cheap coat of paint” approach to challenges.  “Tactics without strategy is noise before defeat.”  Saudi money, Pakistan-Taliban axis will outlast US money and US ground presence.

COUNTERINSURGENCY MANUAL LACKING. Counterinsurgency manual is not realistic and warps policy debate—the reality of poppy crops is not in the manual, not in the “strategy/doctrine”

UN, AID, NGO OOB NOT WORKNG. UN not working, its role not thought out, shortfalls in specialized everything.  Local corruption and family-political angling for contracts lead to some IED’s intended to block or redirect contract funds.  AID  giving contracts to Americans, not Afghans.  US has no ability to create ministries from scratch.  Civilian capabilities non-existent or not understood by military when they do show up.  No inter-agency planning in part because the civilians have no idea why they are there or what they should do.

LOST IN TRANSLATION. Continue to lack Pashto translators.   More Pashto speakers within NYPD than in all US forces across Afghanistan

EXIT OPPORTUNITIES. Afghan Army most respected institution in country, best fighters but worst policemen.  US ground presence makes things worse.  Solutions have to be Afghan.  Afghan population wants sovereignty and independence.  US troops simply surviving, not campaigning.

On page 10 I provide the “Lessons Learned” from my 1992 study of USMC operations.

Commerce Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Commerce
Archive 1992-2006
Archive 1992-2006

2004

SE

Commerce Bjore Commercial Intelligence

2003

SE

Commerce Bjore Reinventing Commercial Intelligence

2002

US

Commerce Klavans Identifying Commercial Opportunities from Emerging Science

2000

US

Commerce Technology Intelligence from Patents

2000

US

Commerce Sullivan Business Perspective on Essential Overseas Information

1999

FR

Commerce Baumlin Espionage or Business Intelligence: Nuances of Gray

1999

UK

Commerce Collier Overview of New Horizons in OSINT Sources, Softwares, Services

1999

US

Commerce Miller The Year the Information Industry Hit Bottom

1999

US

Commerce Robinson How Mobil Uses Open Sources & Services

1998

FR

Commerce Baumlin Black, White, Gray, Realities of the Investigative Marketplace

1998

US

Commerce Boyer Assessing US and Other Space Imaging Options for European Needs

1998

GE

Commerce Bruckner Information and Knowledge Management in Intelligence Situations

1998

US

Commerce Burwell Commercial Online Source Validation Methods

1998

UK

Commerce Collier The Pricing of Electronic Information

1998

US

Commerce Dunn Confronting the Future of the Information Industry

1998

Israel

Commerce Feiler Open and Personal: Economic Intelligence in the Middle East

1998

US

Commerce Horowitz Economic Espionage and OSINT: Legal and Security Implications

1998

US

Commerce Stara Valuing Competitive Intelligence

1998

US

Commerce Yankeelov Pushing the Assets of Time and Knowledge

1997

BE

Commerce Borry & Sohl Electronic Sources & Methods: A Belgian Business Perspective

1997

US

Commerce Suggs International Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Slides)

1997

US

Commerce Suggs International Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Text)

1996

US

Commerce Bates Recent and Emerging Trends in Information Brokering

1996

US

Commerce Call Realities & Myths Regarding Financial Research Using Open Sources

1996

US

Commerce Kolb (SCIP) Sales Pitch for the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals

1996

US

Commerce Sibbit Emerging Business Models for Commercial Remote Sensing

1996

US

Commerce Steele Concise Directory of Selected International Open Sources & Services

1996

US

Commerce Steele Open Source Intelligence Handbook, Chapter 1, Overview

1995

US

Commerce Herring Business Intelligence in Japan and Sweden: Lessons for the US

1995

US

Commerce Herring Intelligence to Enhance American Companies’ Competitiveness

1995

US

Commerce Herring Using the Intelligence Process to Create Competitive Global Advantage

1995

US

Commerce Simon & Blixt Emerging Issues in Competitive Intelligence

1994

US

Commerce Basch Secrets of the Super-Searchers: A Personal and Practical Perspective

1994

Switz

Commerce Bernhardt Tailoring Competitive Intelligence to Executive Needs

1994

UK

Commerce Collier Global Information Industry and a New Information Paradigm

1994

US

Commerce Himelfarb Introduction to Competitive and Business Intelligence

1994

US

Commerce Kelly ASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (S)

1994

US

Commerce Kelly ASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (T)

1994

US

Commerce Marcinko Association of Information and Dissemination Centers, Case Studies

1994

US

Commerce Shaker Beating the Competition: From Boardroom to War Room

1994

US

Commerce Shaker & Rice From War Room to Board Room

1994

US

Commerce Sharp How to Identify Changes that Threaten Your Business Activity, In Advance

1994

US

Commerce Stanat The Power of Global Business Information

1994

US

Commerce Steele Germany: ACCESS:  Theory and Practice of Competitor Intelligence

1994?

US

Commerce Steele ASIDIC: Intelligence Community as a New Market

1993

US

Commerce Caldwell International Investigative Market (Slides)

1993

US

Commerce Caldwell International Investigative Market (Text)

1993

SE

Commerce Dedijer Europe’s To BI or not to BE: Inventory of a New Business Innovation

1993

US

Commerce Elias An Overview of the Information Industry in 1993

1993

AU

Commerce Fraumann Business is War

1993

US

Commerce Herring Business Intelligence: Some Have It, Some Don’t–How They Do It

1993

US

Commerce Himelfarb Intelligence Requirements for Executives

1993

US

Commerce Monaco & Gerliczy Economic Intelligence and Open Source Information

1993

JP

Commerce Shima Overview of Japanese Media and Information Systems

1993

US

Commerce Splitt The U.S. Information Industry: Changing the 21st Century

1993

US

Commerce Steele Corporate Role in National Competitiveness

1993

US

Commerce Steele The Intelligence Community as a New Market

1992

US

Commerce Hlava Information Industry Corporations (Partial Listing)

1992

US

Commerce Hlava Selected Professional and Trade Associations in Information

1992

US

Commerce Hlava The Information Industry: Impact of Globalization

1992

US

Commerce Meyer Business Intelligence at the Cutting Edge

1992

US

Commerce Nobel From A to Z: What We’ve Done with Open Sources

1992

US

Commerce Shaker & Kardulias Intelligence Support to U.S. Business

1992

US

Commerce Williams OSINT to Create Intelligence in a Commercial Environment