Review: Waging Nonviolent Struggle – 20th Century Practice And 21st Century Potential

5 Star, Asymmetric, Cyber, Hacking, Odd War, Change & Innovation, Civil Society, Consciousness & Social IQ, Culture, Research, Democracy, Diplomacy, Peace, Poverty, & Middle Class, Politics, Public Administration, Secession & Nullification, Stabilization & Reconstruction, Survival & Sustainment, Voices Lost (Indigenous, Gender, Poor, Marginalized)
Amazon Page

Gene Sharp

5.0 out of 5 stars Foundation Work Not Yet Appreciated,August 28, 2012

In 1992 I was the second-ranking civilian in Marine Corps intelligence, and with the support of the Marine Corps, sought to get National Intelligence Topics moved from denied areas that were few in number and declining in importance, toward “low-intensity” threats and conditions in the Third World. The Marine Corps also tried to shift the US intelligence collection system from “priority driven” (collect over and over on the same limited set of targets) to “gap driven” (do a first pass on everything, then start over focusing on gaps). I’ve been thinking for a very long time about the deficiencies in US diplomatic, information, military, and economic (DIME) predispositions, bias, capabilities, and Achilles heels. I had more or less given up on the US Government specifically ever coming to its senses, when a bolt of lighting came out of the blue — Admiral James Stavrides, Supreme Commander for NATO, gave a TED talk about “open source security.” That is code for a complex range of things called Operations Other Than War (OOTW), Stabilization & Reconstruction (S&R), Public Diplomacy, and International Assistance, among other things. The US stinks at all of them, in part because we do not have a Whole of Government strategy, operations, intelligence, and logistics approach to anything — stovepipes, each badly managed and crossing wires, seem to be the standard.  The “M” in the Office of Management and Budget is not just silent, it is non-existent.

While I have read many other books relevant to the ideal of creating a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for all, this book was recommended to me as a starting point for avanced thinking in non-violent peace and prosperity operations, as I like to think of them, along with the author’s previous work, The politics of nonviolent action (Extending horizons books).

This is a practical book with very specific case studies and very specific itemizations (198 of them) that may replicate some of the author’s earlier work, but easily make this one book a stand-alone reference work for advanced studies by diplomats, warriors, and policy wonks long isolated from the real world. This book is not a replacement for Howard Zinn’s A Power Governments Cannot Suppress or Jonathan Schell’s The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People. The three go well together.

For the grand strategic view I would suggest Philip Allott’s The Health of Nations: Society and Law beyond the State; at the operational level, Mark Palmer’s Breaking the Real Axis of Evil: How to Oust the World’s Last Dictators by 2025, and at the tactical level, Out of Poverty: What Works When Traditional Approaches Fail (BK Currents (Paperback)).

This is a multi-purpose volume. One can skip the case studies and ingest the beginning and the end, which is what I did, or one can use the volume as a distributed reading and research exercise–if I were using it each case study would be the foundation for a student paper on what never happened — the obliviousness of the UN, NATO, the US, etcetera, to the non-violent intervention points and the importance of NOT persisting with support to dictators and foreign military sales. As an aside, the dirty little secret of the CIA is that they are never serious about deposing evil, they just like to toy with dissidents on the margins — the best documentary on this long-standing fact is Charlie Wilson’s War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History of Our Times.

I value the book for the brevity of its main point: non-violent power is real and practical and has many manifestations (most of them not really known to me in a coherent scheme before reading this book). State power is context dependent, and much — *much* — more subject to public will than most realize.

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Review: Competitive Intelligence Advantage: How to Minimize Risk, Avoid Surprises, and Grow Your Business in a Changing World

5 Star, Intelligence (Commercial)
Amazon Page

REPOSTED to end Russian spammer constant hitting on former URL.

5.0 out of 5 starsBest Possible Starting Point for Executives & Students

October 20, 2009

Seena Sharp

This book is a gem. It is a rare book that I would recommend equally to senior executives and students thinking about a career path, but this is such a book. I agreed to review this book for the publisher and received a free copy. I’ve known the author since the early 1990’s when the U.S. Government first tried to learn how to do commercial intelligence, calling it Open Source Intelligence (OSINT). They still don’t get it, for the same reason most executives don’t get it: arrogance, ignorance, and a complacency that comes from having too much money and not enough accountability.Before laying down my notes, let me first place this book squarely in the top twelve books in English. This is the one I would recommend to anyone as a starter, followed by:

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Who’s Who in Public Intelligence: Seena Sharp

Alpha Q-U, Commercial Intelligence
Seena Sharp
Seena Sharp

Seena Sharp is a pioneer in Competitive Intelligence, founding one of the first CI firms in the US, Sharp Market Intelligence.

They provide market due diligence to large and small companies globally who are seeking growth opportunities.  They detail industries and companies, unknown customers, substitute and indirect competitors, opportunities, market drivers, barriers, and external competitive threats.

John Wiley asked her to write the definitive book on CI for executives, Competitive Intelligence Advantage: How to Minimize Risks, Avoid Surprises, and Grow Your Business in a Changing World, published October 2009.

Her articles appear in a wide range of business publications; she is a popular global speaker, she received the Fellows Award from SCIP, and earned her master’s degree in mathematics from New York University.  Hercompany also publishes SharpInsights, brief alerts on market changes, archived at www.sharpmarket.com

Commerce Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Commerce
Archive 1992-2006
Archive 1992-2006

2004

SE

CommerceBjoreCommercial Intelligence

2003

SE

CommerceBjoreReinventing Commercial Intelligence

2002

US

CommerceKlavansIdentifying Commercial Opportunities from Emerging Science

2000

US

CommerceTechnology Intelligence from Patents

2000

US

CommerceSullivanBusiness Perspective on Essential Overseas Information

1999

FR

CommerceBaumlinEspionage or Business Intelligence: Nuances of Gray

1999

UK

CommerceCollierOverview of New Horizons in OSINT Sources, Softwares, Services

1999

US

CommerceMillerThe Year the Information Industry Hit Bottom

1999

US

CommerceRobinsonHow Mobil Uses Open Sources & Services

1998

FR

CommerceBaumlinBlack, White, Gray, Realities of the Investigative Marketplace

1998

US

CommerceBoyerAssessing US and Other Space Imaging Options for European Needs

1998

GE

CommerceBrucknerInformation and Knowledge Management in Intelligence Situations

1998

US

CommerceBurwellCommercial Online Source Validation Methods

1998

UK

CommerceCollierThe Pricing of Electronic Information

1998

US

CommerceDunnConfronting the Future of the Information Industry

1998

Israel

CommerceFeilerOpen and Personal: Economic Intelligence in the Middle East

1998

US

CommerceHorowitzEconomic Espionage and OSINT: Legal and Security Implications

1998

US

CommerceStaraValuing Competitive Intelligence

1998

US

CommerceYankeelovPushing the Assets of Time and Knowledge

1997

BE

CommerceBorry & SohlElectronic Sources & Methods: A Belgian Business Perspective

1997

US

CommerceSuggsInternational Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Slides)

1997

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CommerceSuggsInternational Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Text)

1996

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CommerceBatesRecent and Emerging Trends in Information Brokering

1996

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CommerceCallRealities & Myths Regarding Financial Research Using Open Sources

1996

US

CommerceKolb (SCIP)Sales Pitch for the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals

1996

US

CommerceSibbitEmerging Business Models for Commercial Remote Sensing

1996

US

CommerceSteeleConcise Directory of Selected International Open Sources & Services

1996

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CommerceSteeleOpen Source Intelligence Handbook, Chapter 1, Overview

1995

US

CommerceHerringBusiness Intelligence in Japan and Sweden: Lessons for the US

1995

US

CommerceHerringIntelligence to Enhance American Companies’ Competitiveness

1995

US

CommerceHerringUsing the Intelligence Process to Create Competitive Global Advantage

1995

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CommerceSimon & BlixtEmerging Issues in Competitive Intelligence

1994

US

CommerceBaschSecrets of the Super-Searchers: A Personal and Practical Perspective

1994

Switz

CommerceBernhardtTailoring Competitive Intelligence to Executive Needs

1994

UK

CommerceCollierGlobal Information Industry and a New Information Paradigm

1994

US

CommerceHimelfarbIntroduction to Competitive and Business Intelligence

1994

US

CommerceKellyASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (S)

1994

US

CommerceKellyASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (T)

1994

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CommerceMarcinkoAssociation of Information and Dissemination Centers, Case Studies

1994

US

CommerceShakerBeating the Competition: From Boardroom to War Room

1994

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CommerceShaker & RiceFrom War Room to Board Room

1994

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CommerceSharpHow to Identify Changes that Threaten Your Business Activity, In Advance

1994

US

CommerceStanatThe Power of Global Business Information

1994

US

CommerceSteeleGermany: ACCESS:  Theory and Practice of Competitor Intelligence

1994?

US

CommerceSteeleASIDIC: Intelligence Community as a New Market

1993

US

CommerceCaldwellInternational Investigative Market (Slides)

1993

US

CommerceCaldwellInternational Investigative Market (Text)

1993

SE

CommerceDedijerEurope’s To BI or not to BE: Inventory of a New Business Innovation

1993

US

CommerceEliasAn Overview of the Information Industry in 1993

1993

AU

CommerceFraumannBusiness is War

1993

US

CommerceHerringBusiness Intelligence: Some Have It, Some Don’t–How They Do It

1993

US

CommerceHimelfarbIntelligence Requirements for Executives

1993

US

CommerceMonaco & GerliczyEconomic Intelligence and Open Source Information

1993

JP

CommerceShimaOverview of Japanese Media and Information Systems

1993

US

CommerceSplittThe U.S. Information Industry: Changing the 21st Century

1993

US

CommerceSteeleCorporate Role in National Competitiveness

1993

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CommerceSteeleThe Intelligence Community as a New Market

1992

US

CommerceHlavaInformation Industry Corporations (Partial Listing)

1992

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CommerceHlavaSelected Professional and Trade Associations in Information

1992

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CommerceHlavaThe Information Industry: Impact of Globalization

1992

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CommerceMeyerBusiness Intelligence at the Cutting Edge

1992

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CommerceNobelFrom A to Z: What We’ve Done with Open Sources

1992

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CommerceShaker & KarduliasIntelligence Support to U.S. Business

1992

US

CommerceWilliamsOSINT to Create Intelligence in a Commercial Environment