2002 Pinkham (US) Citizen Advocacy in the Information Age

Civil Society, Collective Intelligence, Historic Contributions

Public AffairsDouglas G. Pinkham is president of the Public Affairs Council, the leading international association for public affairs professionals. The Council is a non-partisan, non-political organization that provides training and development, “best practice” information and benchmarking services to the profession.

His experience is focused primarily on helping very large corporations (some would call them dinosaurs) get agrip on citizen advocacy and the power of the network.  As he has shown so many clients, engaging clients, engaging citizens, makes you stronger.  They are NOT a threat, they are a foundation for transformation.  Below is his contribution to OSS ’02.  We strongly recommend all of the publications offered by the Public Affairs Council.  Both slides lead to the same briefing.

Doug Pinkham
Doug Pinkham
Doug Pinkham
Doug Pinkham

2001 Dziedzic (US) Information Technology as a Catalyst for Civil-Military Unity of Effort: The Kosovo Test Case

Civil Society, Historic Contributions, Law Enforcement, Military, Peace Intelligence
Dziedzic
USIP Bio Page

Col Michael J. Dziedzic is one of those very rare officers of such intelligence and integrity that he was able to run against the grain for years, focusing on the vital importance of civil-military operations other than war (OOTW) that were “buried” by a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who said (we are not making this up), “Real men don’t do OOTW.”  Of course the Defense Science Board Report on Transitions to and From Hostilities (December 2004) and the current Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, say otherwise.  Principle co-author with Ambassador Bob Oakley of Policing the New World Disorder, still the seminal work in the field, this is an officer, along with Colonel Ferd Irizzary, whom we hope to see earn multiple promotions as we all realize that a multinational multifunctional Earth Rescue Network is a non-negotiable first step to “getting a grip.”  We hold this officer in the very highest esteem.

IT Civil-Military
IT Civil-Military

2001 Oakley (US) The Use of Military & Civilian Power for Engagement and Intervention

Civil Society, Government, Historic Contributions, Military, Peace Intelligence
Amazon Page and Steele Summative Review
Amazon Page and Steele Summative Review

To the left is the cover of the seminal work by Ambassador Bob Oakley and Col Mike Dziedzic and others, at Amazon.  The National Defense University (NDU) logo leads to the book free online at NDU. This book is long over-due for updating and reissuance, this time including a proper index.

Book Free Online
Book Free Online

Below is Ambassador Oakley’s briefing from 2001.

Bob Oakley
Bob Oakley

2001 Wallach Public Citizen Using Public Intelligence in the Public Interest

Civil Society, Collective Intelligence, Commercial Intelligence, Historic Contributions, Non-Governmental
Lori Wallach
Lori Wallach, Director Public Citizen

Lori M. Wallach has been director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch since 1995.

Lori Wallach applies public intelligence in the public interest, and is a true leader of the emerging Epoch B community of indigenous peoples and independent citizens who value appreciative inquiry deliberative dialog, and responsible advocacy against those elements that seek to destroy the commonwealth–Earth–for the short-term profit of a few.

The below text from special coverage of her by Foreign Policy (Spring 2000) came to us courtesy of Moises Naim and was included in the hand-outs received by those attending OSS ’01.

Lori's War (Foreign Policy Spring 2000)
Lori's War (Foreign Policy Spring 2000)

2000 Reynolds (US) Global Reach without Global Intelligence

Civil Society, Historic Contributions, Military, Non-Governmental
Thomas Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds

Mr. Thomas Reynolds, the Deputy J-2 for the U.S. Transportation Command (USTRANCOM) provided an overview of all the places in the Third World where TRASCOM supports not just Special Operations and normal US military forces, but humanitarian assistance endeavors.  As USMC and USSOCOM discovered in 1988, we do not have 1:50,000 combat charts for 90% of the Third World, and that is still largely true today (the vaunted shuttle mission came back with a lot of swiss cheese).

The short text summary and the slides are contained in the same document.  What we have learned over the years is that the global providers of lift and logistics are the red-headed step-children of the government world, the last to receive proper intellience support, and the most likely to benefit hugely from Open Source Intelligence (OSINT).

Thomas Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds