1997 Botbol (FR) The Open Source Revolution: Early Failures and Future Prospects

Government, Historic Contributions, History, Media, Policy
Maurice Botbol
Maurice Botbol

Maurice Botbol was among the first professional observers to notice the conflict between the secret intelligence world’s view of open sources as “Open Sores,” and the competing view of open sources as both complementary and often sufficient.  Below is his presentation to OSS ’97.  His most trenchant observations are regretably not included in the document.  Click on his photo to reach his publishing company.

Early Failures
Early Failures

1997 Herman (UK) Has the (Secret) Community a Future?

Academia, Government, Historic Contributions
Michael Herman
Michael Herman

Temporarily two documents, move past Dick Kerr who has his own page, this document is being split up and will be properly mounted in the very near future.

1997 Kerr (US) The Intelligence Community Today and Tomorrow

Government, Historic Contributions
Dick Kerr
Dick Kerr

Dick Kerr, former Deputy Director of Central Intelligence for Intelligence (DDI), was among hte most personable and approachable intelligence leaders in retirement.  Like Jim Schlesinger, who nailed it in the 1970’s, he understood the problems, but “The Borg” has a life of its own absent a forced paradigm shift.

1996 Strassmann (US) U.S. Knowledge Assets: Choice Traget for Information Crime

Commerce, Commercial Intelligence, Government, Historic Contributions, Law Enforcement
Paul Strassmann
Paul Strassmann

Whenever we get depressed about the inability of large organizations to “hear” we just remind ourselves that no one listens to Brent Scowcroft or Paul Strassmann either despite their stature as intellectual giants.

Strassmann is an enterprise unto himself after decades of being a CIO for Xerox, DoD, and then a reprise at NASA for Sean O’Keefe.  His books are among the most vital for executives seeking to actually understand the business value of computing.  Below is his presentation to OSS ’96.

Knowledge Targets
Knowledge Targets

1996 Steele (US) Standard Briefing for US Intelligence Community

Briefings & Lectures, Collective Intelligence, Government

For a time it appeared as if the US IC might actually listen, and a short standard briefing emerged that appeared to capture the essentials.  Below is the outline as it appeared in the Proceedings for OSS ’96.

Standard IC Briefing
Standard IC Briefing

1996 Zuckerman (US) Economic Intelligence and the National Interest

Commerce, Commercial Intelligence, Government, Historic Contributions
Mortimer Zuckerman
Mortimer Zuckerman

Something of a renaissance man, Mort Zuckerman is active across real estate, the media (US News & World Report), the talk shows, and the Smithsonian cultural circuit.  Below is his hard-hitting commentary as presented at OSS ’96. Read this carefully.  See especially the use of the word “manic.” The US Government is not trained, equipped, or organized to be intelligent.  The consumers of intelligence do not represent the public as much as they do the recipients of the public’s largesse, and do not know how to do intelligence in the public interest.  The secret intelligence community refuses to create a strategic analytic model, and continues to be driven by budget, technical, and bureaucratic consideration–inputs–rather than desired outcomes.

1996 Zuckerman Economic Intelligence

Reference (1996): The Brown Commission and the Future of Intelligence

Cultural Intelligence, Director of National Intelligence et al (IC), Government, IO Impotency
Carmen Medina What to Do When Traditional Models Fail

The Brown Commission and the Future of Intelligence

A Roundtable Discussion

On 1 March 1996, the Commission on the Roles and Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community (the Brown Commission) issued its report to the President and to Congress. On 26 March, Studies in Intelligence board members Brian Latell, Robert Herd, John Wiant, and Bill Nolte met at the Commission’s offices in the New Executive Office Building with Ann Z. Caracristi, a member of the Commission; Staff Director L. Britt Snider; and staff members Douglas Horner, Brendan Melley, Kevin Scheid, and William Kvetkas. What follows is an edited transcript of the discussion with them, reviewed in advance by the participants.

Continue reading “Reference (1996): The Brown Commission and the Future of Intelligence”

1995 Bender (US) The Information Highway: Will Librarians Be Left by the Side of the Road?

Academia, Commerce, Government, Historic Contributions, Law Enforcement
Special Libraries Association
Special Libraries Association
David R. Bender
David R. Bender

In 1986, Project GEORGE (Smiley) in the CIA’s Office of Information Technology discovered that computers had been designed without ever talking to librarians.  There were created as unstructured bit buckets.  It turns out that in the analog period, structure and the Dewey decimal system and humanly-constructed taxonomies were vitally important if one was to archive and retrieve knowledge within the limits of the individual human.  During the middle period, which is STILL IN PROGRESS, computers have failed to get a grip on unstructured information.  As Stephen E. Arnold and others have documented, electronic search yields less than 10% of what is online (apart from deep web not covered by any of the 75 search engines, there are C drives and peripheral drives that have not been indexed).  Although David Weinberg is correct in his book Everything is Miscellaneous, and the digital world opens the propect for infinitely sharing information while retaining the original, and for creating infinite wealth by eliminating information asymmetries and data pathologies that favor the few at the expense of the many, there is no single government, corporation, organization, or collective other than Earth Intelligence Network and its affiliated society, Phi Beta Iota, that is actually committed to realizing the full potential of humans as H. G. Wells, Pierre Tielhard de Chardin, Stewart Brand, Kevin Kelly, and others have envisioned: as the World Brain within Earth Game, all humans, all minds, all the time.  See the 2009 article on Human Intelligence by clicking on the icon below.

HUMINT 21
HUMINT 21

1995 Markowitz (US) Community Open Source Program Office (COSPO)

Briefings (Core), Government, Historic Contributions
Joe Markowitz
Joe Markowitz

2006 PLATINUM LIFETIME AWARD   Dr. Joseph Markowitz
Dr. Joseph Markowitz is without question the most qualified Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) pioneer in the ranks of those presently in or retired from U.S. government service.  As the only real chief of the Community Open Source Program Office (COSPO) he tried valiently to nurture a program being systematically undermined by both the leadership and the traditional broadcast monitoring service.  When he moved on to advise the Defense Science Board, he served America well by helping them fully integrate the need for both defense open source information collection and exploitation, and defense information sharing with non-governmental organizations.  His persistent yet diplomatic efforts merit our greatest regard.  1995 Markowitz COSPO

1995 Peters (US) INADEQUATE ANSWERS: Bureaucracy, Wealth, and the Mediocrity of U.S. Intelligence Analysis

Government, Historic Contributions
Ralph Peters
Ralph Peters

Ralph Peters is the only author other than Will Durant to have his own shelf in the OSS/EIN/PBI library.  He can anger, infuriate, provoke and sometimes even drive insane those who are impatient with controversy.  We hold him in the highest regard as one who consistently speaks truth to power.  See the reviews of his many books.

Below is his speech to the Open Source Intelligence Lunch Club on 12 September 1995, as included in the Proceedings of that year’s conference.

Inadequate Answers
Inadequate Answers