UN-NGO Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Non-Governmental
Archives 1992-2006
Archives 1992-2006

2006

US

NGONoneDraft Legislation to Establish Department of Peace

2006

SE

NGOSalinPeacekeeping Intelligence Training

2006

US

NGOSteelePeacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping 1.3

2006

SE

NGOSvenssonSwedish Peacekeeping Intelligence Curriculum

2006

SE

NGOSvenssonSwedish Peacekeeping Intelligence Course Description

2006

US

NGOTillmanDepartment of Peace (Kucinich Supports)

2006

US

NGOTillmanPeace Trip

2004

US

NGOSchellReview of Unconquerable World by Richard Falk

2004

US

NGOSteelePKI III: Peacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping

2004

US

NGOSteeleSweden: Peacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping

2003

AF

NGOBrahimiBrahimi Report Extracts Relevant to UN/NGO Intelligence Function

2003

NL

NGOCammaertComments on Intelligence and Peacekeeping

2003

US

NGOSteelePeacekeeping Intelligence Leadership Guidance 1.0

2003

US

NGOSteeleInformation Peacekeeping & The Future of Intelligence

2003

US

NGOSteele et alPeacekeeping Intelligence Leadership Digest 1.0

2002

US

NGOSteeleNetherlands: Information Peacekeeping & The Future of Intelligence

2002

US

NGOSteeleNetherlands Keynote on Information Peacekeeping

2000

CA

NGOChartersOSINT for Peace Operations: Perspectives from UN Operations

2000

UN

NGOChitumbo et alNuclear Transparency through Open Source Intelligence (Slides)

2000

UN

NGOChitumbo et alNuclear Transparency through Open Source Intelligence (Text)

1999

US

NGODearthPeacekeeping in the Information Age

1999

Switz

NGOFuchsSummary of 1994 Remarks on Red Cross OSINT

1999

UN

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Participants

1999

US

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Background Paper

1999

US

NGOGDINProposal to Increase Information Sharing Through ReliefWeb

1999

US

NGORhoaderPeace Wing

1999

AU

NGOSmithIntelligence and UN Peacekeeping

1998

US

NGOGDINBackground on Meeting of Disaster Relief Experts

1998

US

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Conference Concept Paper

1996

US

NGOAir ForcePeacespace Dominance

1994

Switz

NGOFuchsComplete Remarks of the Director General of the Red Cross

1994

Switz

NGOFuchsHandling Information in Humanitarian Operations Within Armed Conflicts

1993

US

NGOSteeleInformation Peacekeeping: A Note

1993

US

NGOWhitney-SmithToward an Epistemology of Peace

Review: The Unconquerable World–Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People

7 Star Top 1%, America (Anti-America), Asymmetric, Cyber, Hacking, Odd War, Consciousness & Social IQ, Cosmos & Destiny, Democracy, Empire, Sorrows, Hubris, Blowback, Future, History, Insurgency & Revolution, Intelligence (Public), Military & Pentagon Power, Peace, Poverty, & Middle Class, Philosophy, Public Administration, Values, Ethics, Sustainable Evolution, Voices Lost (Indigenous, Gender, Poor, Marginalized)
Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars7 Star Life Transformative  Restores Faith, Non-Violent Restoration of People Power,

September 13, 2003
Jonathan Schell

Edit of 21 Dec 07 to add links

This book, together with William Geider’s The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy, and Mark Hertsgaard’s The Eagle’s Shadow: Why America Fascinates and Infuriates the World, in one of three that I believe every American needs to read between now and November 2004.

Across 13 chapters in four parts, the author provides a balanced overview of historical philosophy and practice at both the national level “relations among nations” and the local level (“relations among beings”). His bottom line: that the separation of church and state, and the divorce of social responsibility from both state and corporate actions, have so corrupted the political and economic governance architectures as to make them pathologically dangerous.

His entire book discusses how people can come together, non-violently, to restore both their power over capital and over circumstances, and the social meaning and values that have been abandoned by “objective” corporations and governments.

The book has applicability to Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places where the US is foolishly confusing military power with political power. As he says early on, it is the public *will* that must be gained, the public *consent* to a new order–in the absence of this, which certainly does not exist in either Iraq or Afghanistan, no amount of military power will be effective (to which I would add: and the cumulative effect of the financial and social cost of these military interventions without end will have a reverse political, economic, and social cost on the invader that may make the military action a self-inflicted wound of great proportions).

Across the book, the author examines three prevailing models for global relations: the universal empire model, the balance of power model, and the collective security model. He comes down overwhelmingly on the side of the latter as the only viable approach to current and future global stability and prosperity.

A quote from the middle of the book captures its thesis perfectly: “Violence is a method by which the ruthless few can subdue the passive many. Nonviolence is a means by which the active many can overcome the ruthless few.”

Taking off from the above, the author elaborates on three sub-themes:

First, that cooperative power is much greater, less expensive, and more lasting that coercive power.

Second, that capitalism today is a scourge on humanity, inflicting far greater damage–deaths, disease, poverty, etcetera–that military power, even the “shock and awe” power unleashed against Afghanistan and Iraq without public debate.

Third, and he draws heavily on Hannah Arendt, here a quote that should shame the current US Administration because it is so contradictory to their belief in “noble lies”–lies that Hitler and Goering would have admired. She says, “Power is actualized only where word and deed have not parted company, where words are not empty and deeds not brutal, where words are not used to veil intentions but to disclose realities, and deeds are not used to violate and destroy but to establish relations and create new realities.”

Toward the end of the book the author addresses the dysfunctionality of the current “absolute sovereignty” model and concludes that in an era of globalization, not only must the US respect regional and international sovereignty as an over-lapping authority, but that we must (as Richard Falk recommended in the 1970’s) begin to recognize people’s or nations as distinct entities with culturally-sovereign rights that over-lap the states within which the people’s reside–this would certainly apply to the Kurds, spread across several states, and it should also apply to the Jews and to the Palestinians, among many others.

On the last page, he says that we have a choice between survival and annihilation. We can carry on with unilateral violence, or we the people can take back the power, change direction, and elect a government that believes in cooperative non-violence, the only path to survival that appears to the author, and to this reviewer, as viable.

This is a *very* important book, and it merits careful reading by every adult who wishes to leave their children a world of peace and prosperity. We can do better. What we are doing now is destructive in every sense of the word.

Other recommended books with reviews:
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom
The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty Through Profits (Wharton School Publishing Paperbacks)
Breaking the Real Axis of Evil: How to Oust the World’s Last Dictators by 2025
Faith-Based Diplomacy: Trumping Realpolitik
Day of Reckoning: How Hubris, Ideology, and Greed Are Tearing America Apart
The Global Class War: How America’s Bipartisan Elite Lost Our Future – and What It Will Take to Win It Back
A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship

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