1988-2009 OSINT-M4IS2 TECHINT Chronology

Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Methods & Process, Mobile, Policies, Real Time, Threats
Rock ON, Dude
Steele as Wild Card Speaker

Phi Beta Iota: This started as a short list for the various college and university engineering students that have dialed in, but as we got into it, it became more of a “situational awareness” inventory pulling together both technical “solutions” none of which have been integrated yet, and analytic “requirements” none of which have been satisfied yet.

$75 billion a year for secret intelligence, and we still do not have an analytic desktop toolkit, all-source geospatially and historically and cultural astute back office processing, or global reach to all humans, all minds, all the time.  Sucks for us.  Let’s see what the Smart Mob can do….

We specifically invite suggestions in the Comments for removing items from this list, or for adding items from within this website or from any other website.  This is now a work zone.  Steele is available to visit any engineering workshop and especially those working on bottom-up clouds like Swarm DPL (transparently scalable distributed programming language).

See also About the Idea, Articles, Briefs, Handbooks, and Historic Contributions. Use the Menu–everything on this stie responds to “OSINT” that is not a good search term.  Rock on!

TOTALLY TECH:

2009 Arnold Google: The Digital Gutenberg

2008 Memoranda: Policy-Budget Outreach Tool

2006  USSOCOM Software List and STRONG ANGEL TOOZL

2006 Morville (UK) Ambient Findability Massive Scale Beyond Your Imagination A Recommedned Approach to Creating the World Brain with Instant Recall

Continue reading “1988-2009 OSINT-M4IS2 TECHINT Chronology”

Vendor Pitch Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Commerce

2006

US

VendorFlemingIcosystem

2006

US

VendorLedermanDeep Web Technologies

2006

US

VendorProctorIBM’s Text Analytic OS Architecture

2006

US

VendorRuhCISCO’s Application Oriented Network

2004

US

VendorDietzLEXIS-NEXIS Open Sources on North Korea

2004

US

VendorDietzTop Ten Stories on North Korea

2001

US

VendorNABright Planet White Paper on the Deep Web

2001

UK

VendorRotherayBBC Views on New Risks of Crisis Seen From Open Sources (Slides)

2001

UK

VendorRotherayBBC Views on New Risks of Crisis Seen From Open Sources (Text)

1999

US

VendorBoyerAUTOMETRIC (Now Boeing): High Resolution Imagery

1999

NL

VendorDataExpertDateExpert

1999

US

VendorPowerizePowerize Overview

1998

UK

VendorBrentonMEMEX Software

1998

UK

VendorHunterI2: Creating Intelligence Automatically

1998

US

VendorRetrieval Tech.Real Time News Meets Knowledge Management

1997

US

VendorBlejerSRA: Intelligence Information Systems

1997

US

VendorCORECORE SW: Business Plan Summary

1997

US

VendorJacobsISOQUEST: Software for Managing Information Overload

1997

US

VendorRodriguezDIALOG: Targetted Decisions Support versus Generic Internet

1997

US

VendorWeigandForecast International: Reducing Risk Via Practical OSINT (Slides)

1997

US

VendorWeigandForecast International: Reducing Risk Via Practical OSINT (Text)

1996

US

VendorDixonLEXIS-NEXIS, Online Public Records and Criminal Investigations

1996

UK

VendorHutchinsonJane’s: The Role of Sources in Open Intelligence

1996

US

VendorKrattenmakerLEXIS-NEXIS, LEXMAP Demonstration and Discussion

1996

US

VendorNachmanoffOxford Analytica: Economic Intelligence Services for the Private Sector

1996

US

VendorNanzSPOT Image: Remarks on Commercial Imagery

1995

US

VendorMcLaganNewsEdge, Tailored News Alerts for a Competitive Edge

1995

US

VendorNanzCommercial Imagery and National Defense (Slides)

1995

US

VendorNanzCommercial Imagery and National Defense (Text)

1995

UK

VendorRolingtonJane’s: A Theory of Open Source Information

1994

US`

VendorVajta-WilliamsSpace Imaging, Commercial Imagery, and You

1993

UK

VendorHallJane’s Approach to the New Threat Environment

1992

US

VendorDriverN-STAR: An Automated Analyst Tool for Open Source Data

1992

US

VendorHutchinsonJane’s RUMOR OF WAR: An Information Vendor’s View

1992

US

VendorKovalyUnique Wire Service Provides Early Intelligence

1992

US

VendorPincusMETAMORPH: Theoretical Background and Operational Functionality

1992

US

VendorVendorPERISCOPE, Commercial Open Source

Technologies Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Technologies

2006

US

TechnologyArnoldThe Google Legacy

2005

US

TechnologyCISCOCISCO Application Oriented Network One-Pager

2005

US

TechnologyCISCOCISCO Application Oriented Network Executive IT Overview

2005

US

TechnologySteeleGSA Roundtable on IT Innovation

2004

US

TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Presentation

2004

US

TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Architecture and Applications

2004

US

TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Non-Memo

2004

US

TechnologyArnoldThe Information Technology Marketplace

2004

US

TechnologyArnoldTable of Contents for Enterprise Search Book

2004

US

TechnologyGAOReport on the Global Information Grid and DoD

2004

US

TechnologyGillOpen Spectrum as the Third Open

2004

US

TechnologyGillWireless Grid: The Possibilities

2004

US

TechnologyGuestCommentary on GAO Report on DoD Global Information Grid

2004

US

TechnologySteeleCommentary of GAO Report on DoD Global Information Grid

2003

US

TechnologyArnoldOne Machine…One View

2003

US

TechnologyHockThe Open-ness of the Internet

2002

US

TechnologyArnoldNomadic Computing

2002

US

TechnologySteeleNSA in Las Vegas: New Craft: What Should the T Be Doing to the I in IT?

2002

US

TechnologySteeleNSA in Las Vegas: New Craft (Alternative Copy)

2002

US

TechnologyStrattonIn-Q-Tel

1999

US

TechnologyArnoldIntelligence Management and the Bottom Line

1998

US

TechnologyArnoldThe Changing Intelligence Environment

1998

US

TechnologyArnoldThe Future of Online

1997

US

TechnologyArnoldTechnology Vectors: 1998 and Beyond

1997

US

TechnologyManiMITRE: Search Engine Technologies

1997

US

TechnologyMayburyMITRE: Knowledge Management

1996

US

TechnologyRuhOptimizing Corporate Capital Through Information Technology

1994

US

TechnologyEnglebartToward High-Performance Organizations: A Strategic Role for Groupware

1992

US

TechnologyMcConnellThe Future Federal Information Infrastructure

1992

US

TechnologyRheingoldTools for Thinking & Virtual Reality: Our Info EcoSystem

1988

US

TechnologySteeleGeneric Intelligence Center Production Requirements

Review: Enterprise Integration–The Essential Guide to Integration Solutions (Addison-Wesley Information Technology Series)

Information Technology

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Elegant, Easy to Read, Good Primer for Managers,

December 12, 2004
Beth Gold-Bernstein

If you are a manager to whom information technologists report, or a manager that employs technical advisors who in turn help oversee varied IT procurements and implementations, then this book is an ideal primer. It can also be scary, because I will wager than in 7 out of 10 cases, the technical experts are not pursuing the enterprise integration fundamentals that this book outlines.

Both authors are strong in their own right. The book bring together Bill Ruh, former MITRE, MITRETEK, and Concepts 5 guru, today the global manager for CISCO AONS, who is updating his 2000 book on the topic, with Beth Gold-Bernstein, who has consulted, lectured, and written on this topic, and has her own book titled “Enterprise Integration: A Practical Approach.”

I regard the book, and the topic, as a watershed between the old days of configuration management and a focus on data that was largely within internal custody, and today, when real-time data integration and exploitation is required across both all internal points (i.e. including the 85% that is in emails and hard drives) and external points–not just the web, but supplier, buyer, regulatory, and other databases.

I recommend this book for managers in part because the book itself is quite clear on the fact that information technology by itself, no matter how much money is thrown at it, will not achieve enterprise information integration. Management mind-sets, management metrics, management enforcement of standards and compliance with the strategic direction implied by enterprise integration, are all required.

Early in the book there are important references to both scale and speed, with the key difference between the 1990’s and today being that instead of humans accessing the data, there now much more machine to machine communication and sharing, and this requires hyper-speed. There is also much more focus on event-driven information actions, with Delta Airlines being cited as a very good case study–the system must be able to take many autonomous actions triggered by an event (e.g. an airplane more than 15 minutes late, with repercussions across gate management, luggage management, connections management, catering management, etc.). Zero latency, real-time enterprise, and event-driven information transactions are among the buzz words.

The case study of CISCO on page 6 grabbed me early on–my primary focus is on the Global War on Terror (GWOT), and reading about CISCO’s move to real-time metrics (this book is *very* strong on metrics, which I take to be a very good thing) and real-time decision making and course corrections, I was thinking to myself that CISCO is to information as special operations are to terror. So when CISCO doubled productivity, cut costs by 30%, and made daily reporting the norm, I say to myself: okay, now let’s see that in GWOT….this book is Ref A in answering that challenge. Another case study, on FedEx using hand-held devices as both points of data entry in the field, and end points for data value to the field, also struck me as relevant to GWOT.

Throughout the book, one of its own phrases: “people are the most expensive part of any system,” keeps resonating, because everything in here is about either increasing productivity or reducing the time-cost of information transactions. This book also has a very healthy focus on information sharing across all boundaries, with appropriate security, privacy, and legal attributes for each transaction.

Standards receive heavy emphasis throughout.

The book is slightly dated on the topic of automated metastandards and semantic data definitions, but I know the authors to be personally very engaged in the very latest developments surrounding semantic web and synthetic information architectures and other related automated assignments of meaning, so I take this to be primarily an issue of timing–the book had to be put to bed.

The chapters on Information Integration Architecture and on Information Integration, the ones I was most looking forward to reading, strike me as the least developed among the many excellent parts of this book. In part this is because Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is just coming of age, and truly scalable solutions to the challenge of managing global multi-media multi-lingual unstructured information data (Cf. InfoSphere AB in Sweden) are just now coming into being. This chapter does provide an important itemization of key organizations responsible for metadata standards, and lays out a framework for establishing “who needs to know what when” as part of the manager’s contribution to the over-all enterprise integration planning process. These two chapters excel in pointing out that information management is about ensuring long-term data value, allowing for reachback over time and space.

In its conclusion the book makes reference to turf wars, training, reducing redundancy, reducing reliance on proprietary technologies with lock-in costs, finding a return on assets, and creating a culture of reuse. The last hundred pages of the book, and the CD-ROM, provide templates that any manager could reasonably demand of their technical advisors. I opened these up and found them very useful, to the point of being worth at least a week if not more of man-time, and hence easily repaying the price of the book many times over.

The bibliography is good and the index has been thoughtfully developed. I recommend this book to anyone who deals with global information in any form, but especially to managers who might be wondering if their IT people have any clue as to where they are taking the enterprise and its information. This book also strikes me a superb textbook, both for undergraduates as a primer, and for graduates as a foundation for a more nuanced discussion. For myself, it was “just enough, just in time” information, exactly what I wanted and needed in my specific context.

Vote on Review
Vote on Review