Worth a Look: SciVal from Elsevier

Analysis, Collective Intelligence, Maps, Politics of Science & Science of Politics, Research resources, Tools, Worth A Look

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We have in the past highlighted the work of Dick Klavans, who along with Brad Ashton is one of our foremost Scientific & Technical Intelligence (S&TI) colleagues.  Apart from his book with Brad, Keeping Abreast of Science and Technology: Technical Intelligence for Business and his new web site, Maps of Science, see also on this site: 2002 Klavans (US) Technology Mapping: A Workshop on (Open) Sources & Methods for Identifying Commercial Opportunities in Technology and 2002 Klavans (US) Tomorrow’s Hotspots: Identifying Commercial Opportunities from Science.

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Elsevier is now commercializing what Dick has been doing for the last twenty years in one-of productions, and we believe this capability will be extraordinary, not only in performance measurement and performance enhancement for specific disciplinary units, but in demanding that inter-disciplinary and integrative problem-finding and solving come back into being.

2002 Klavans (US) Tomorrow’s Hotspots: Identifying Commercial Opportunities from Science

Analysis, Historic Contributions, Methods & Process, Technologies
Maps of Science
Maps of Science

Visit Dick Klavans, the top gun for mapping science & technology across all boundaries.  Below, with Brad Ashton, his co-author for Keeping Abreast of Science and Technology: Technical Intelligence for Business, is the lecture he presented at OSS ’02 on this topic:

Technology Hotspots
Technology Hotspots

2002 Klavans (US) Technology Mapping: A Workshop on (Open) Sources & Methods for Identifying Commercial Opportunities in Technology

Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Historic Contributions, Policies, Threats, Topics (All Other)
Maps of Science
Maps of Science

Dick is President and Chief Executive Officer  of Maps of Science, having founded the company in 1991. Between 1991 and 2000, he created maps of science for large pharmaceutical, chemical and physics-based firms. He completely rewrote the computer algorithms in 2000, and continues to modify them in order to generate the most accurate maps possible. Dick, and Chief Technical Officer Kevin Boyack have a strong publication record on mapping science, and are considered world leaders in this area (see bibliography).  We met Dick in the 1990’s when we were exploring how best to identify the top 100 experts on anything and everything, and he is still the master, aided by an exclusive total right of access to all citation analysis data owned by and generated by the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) founded by Eugene Garfield (a small part of our Aspin-Brown Commission testimony in 1995 that persauded them the US Intelligence Community was “severely deficient” in not being able to do what OSS CEO did with six  telephone calls).

Below is Dick’s OSS ’02 workshop on Technology Mapping, done with Brad Ashton, his co-author in producing what is still the best book on the subject, Keeping Abreast of Science and Technology: Technical Intelligence for Business.

Technology Mapping
Technology Mapping

Review: Keeping Abreast of Science and Technology: Technical Intelligence for Business

5 Star, Intelligence (Commercial)

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN//ossnet-20
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN//ossnet-20

5.0 out of 5 stars Best book on the market for technical business intelligence,

April 8, 2000
W. Bradford Ashton
Dick is a genius, and he and Bradford Ashton have pulled together a number of very fine contributions in this book. Still, they sum it up nicely in the concluding chapter: “The formal practice of developing technical intelligence in American business is only in its infancy.” They have a nice appendix of sources on scientific and technical intelligence that is missing a few big obvious sources like the Canadian Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) and the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) as well as the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) and several smaller sources. On balance, this technical intelligence community is, as Bradford notes, in its infancy. It is U.S. centric, does not yet understand operational security and counterintelligence, is weak of cost intelligence, relies too heavily on registered patents, and has too few practical successes stories. Especially troubling is the recent trend within DIA and the Air Force of cutting off all funding for open source exploitation of Chinese and other foreign S&T sources, combined with a dismantling by many corporations of their libraries and most basic market research functions. This book is an essential reference and I admire its authors greatly-sadly, they are part of a small minority that has not yet found its full voice.
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