2000 Mueller (AT) Some Thoughts on Open Source

Historic Contributions, Military

Austrian military intelligence is concerned with central Asia as well as former elements of the USSR, and it has been a great benefit to the multinational participants to have Austian field grade officers in regular attendance.  At OSS 2000 Brigadier General Wolfgang Mueller brought back to the group his own service’s experience and concerns.

Wolfgang Mueller
Wolfgang Mueller
Wolfgang Mueller
Wolfgang Mueller

2000 Politi (IT) The Birth of OSINT in Italy

Government, Historic Contributions, Law Enforcement, Media, Military
Alessandro Politi
Alessandro Politi

Alessandro Politi was “present at the creation” in 1992, and on that occasion, while not a speaker, coined the term “intelligence minuteman” over dinner, and was instantly recognized as a thought leader.  he went on to pioneer modern OSINT within Italy as well as the Western European Union.

Golden Candle Award: Mr. Alessandro Politi, Western European Union OSS ’93: Mr. Alessandro Politi, developer of “Intelligence Minuteman” concept and one of the leading advocates of open source intelligence within the Western European Union.

Click on the Frog to connect to his article about the “intelligence minuteman” concept as ultimately published in the International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence.

NATO OSINT Handbook, Reader, & Intelligence Exploitation of the Internet
Politi in IJIC on Intelligence Minuteman

2000 Reynolds (US) Global Reach without Global Intelligence

Civil Society, Historic Contributions, Military, Non-Governmental
Thomas Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds

Mr. Thomas Reynolds, the Deputy J-2 for the U.S. Transportation Command (USTRANCOM) provided an overview of all the places in the Third World where TRASCOM supports not just Special Operations and normal US military forces, but humanitarian assistance endeavors.  As USMC and USSOCOM discovered in 1988, we do not have 1:50,000 combat charts for 90% of the Third World, and that is still largely true today (the vaunted shuttle mission came back with a lot of swiss cheese).

The short text summary and the slides are contained in the same document.  What we have learned over the years is that the global providers of lift and logistics are the red-headed step-children of the government world, the last to receive proper intellience support, and the most likely to benefit hugely from Open Source Intelligence (OSINT).

Thomas Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds

1998 Open Source Intelligence: Private Sector Capabiltiies to Support DoD Policy, Acquisition, and Operations

Articles & Chapters, Articles & Chapters, Military, Reform, Technologies

The below reference and article was drafted by Robert Steele with some editorial assistance from Mark Lowenthal, who was briefly an employee of OSS before jumping to SRA International.  The article draws on the experience of the Marine Corps Intelligence Center (MCIC) that was established by General Al Gray, USMC, then Commandant of the Marine Corps, largely to support expeditionary acquisition.  The Army, the Navy, and the Air Force are all “big system” services, and while the Army has begun to learn how to “eat the tail” and reduce the logistics footprint (as well as the ground convey exposure and expense), the reality is that DoD acquisition remains totally hosed today, and 20,000 new people (as planned by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates) are not going to be effecive for three reasons:

1.  DoD makes policy without regard to strategy or intelligence

2.  DoD acquires systems without regard to strategy, lacking a strategic analytic model

3.  DoD is long over-due for massive changes to Title 109 such that we have four proponents for Big War, Small War, Peace War, and Homeland Defense (each of the Services could be redirected appropriately) but–big but–the regional combatant commanders become BOTH the hubs for Whole of Government inter-agency planning, programming, and budgeting AND the primary proponents for what is needed in their theaters.

DoD Acquisition
DoD Acquisition

Should it not be crystal clear, the “butts in seats” approach in which contractors cost the taxpayer 250% of their salary is not sanctioned by this early article on how to fix intelligence support to acquisition.  Small cells, a global grid of multinational sharing and sense-making partners, and the ability to “know who knows,” to apply strategic analytic tradecraft, and to produce “just enough, just in time, just right” Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) that either stands on its own or radically enhances all-source intelligence production, are the way to go.  No one now providing OSINT under OMB Code M320 understaqnds how to do that.

1997 Tyrrell (UK) Proposals for the Development of an Open Source Programme to Support NATO and PfP Activities

Historic Contributions, Military, Non-Governmental, Peace Intelligence
1997 NATO Handbooks
Commodore Patrick Tyrell, RN OBE

Without the leadership of then Capt Patrick Tyrrell, RN OBE, these handbooks would not exist today.  He started the ball rolling, BGen Jim Cox, CA, then NATO and SHAPE Deputy J-2 organized a lecture to all the flag officers in charge of military intelligence, and finally directed SACLANT, then led by General William Kernan, USA, to create these first multinational doctrinal guides.  Under the direct supervision of Admiral Sir William Pewone, RN, this was done over the course of two years. Below is the white paper and lecture that started it all.

NATO Awakes....
NATO Awakes....

1995 Bjore (SE) Six Years of Open Source Information (OSI) Lessons Learned

Historic Contributions, Military
Mats Bjore CEO InfoSphere (SE)
Mats Bjore CEO InfoSphere (SE)

Mats Bjore, along with Arno Reuser, Steve Edwards, Joe Markowitz, is one of a tiny handful of “originals” who have striven to create the discipline of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) that has now morphed into M4IS2 (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making).  Collective Intelligence, Cognitive Science, and Civil Affairs as well as Civil Society are all congregating outside of government “control.”

Lessons Learned
Lessons Learned