2003 Davis (US) Analytic Paradoxes: Can Open Source Intelligence Help?

Analysis, Communities of Practice, Historic Contributions
Jack Davis
Jack Davis

PLATINUM Jack Davis, De Facto Dean of the U.S. Intelligence Analytic Corps

For over three decades, Jack Davis has been the heir to Sherman Kent and the mentor to all those who would strive to be the world’s most effective all-source intelligence analysts.  As a Central Intelligence Agency analyst and educator, he combines intellect, integrity, insight, and an insatiable appetite for interaction with all manner of individuals regardless of rank and disposition.  He is the most able pioneer of “analytic tradecraft,” the best proponent for the value of human analysis over technical processing, and one of those very special individuals who helped define the end of 20th Century centralized analysis and the beginning of 21st Century distributed multinational multiagency analysis.

Clicking on the photo leads to a seminal essay by Jack Davis on Sherman Kent and the Analytic Craft.

Below are his origional reflections prepared for OSS ’03.  At the Frog is a link to his unqiue collection of memoranda on Analytic Tradecraft.

Jack Davis
Jack Davis
Jack Davis Compendium of Analytic Tradecraft Notes
Jack Davis Compendium of Analytic Tradecraft Notes

2003 Medina (US) 21st Century Analysis–The Coming Revolution in Intelligence Analysis: What to do when the Traditional Model Fails

Analysis, Government, Historic Contributions
Interview with Carmen Medina
Interview with Carmen Medina

Carmen Median retired–her brilliance and innovative spirit surfaced at the top too late in the game.  She is, however, like General Peter Schoomaker, USA (Ret), one of those bright lights that in our view should be brought back in to manage a global multinational information sharing and sense-making grid.  She is not forgotten, and we hold her in the very highest esteem.

Below is the presentation she made to OSS ’03, and a link to the article in Studies in Intelligence that remains, along with everything written by Jack Davis, seminal.

Carmen Medina
Carmen Medina
Carmen Medina What to Do When Traditional Models Fail
Carmen Medina What to Do When Traditional Models Fail

2000 PRIMER on Open Sources & Methods

Methods & Process, OSINT Generic

2000

SE

Training Bjore PRIMER: How InfoSphere Uses the Internet

2000

US

Training CSM PRIMER: Top Secret Kodak Moments in Space

2000

US

Training David PRIMER: Intelligence Analysis in a New Century

2000

US

Training Davis PRIMER: Compendium of Analytic Tradecraft Notes

2000

NL

Training Farace PRIMER: Gray Literature 2: Finding the Not Easily Found

2000

US

Training Klein PRIMER: Gray Literature 1: Finding the Needle in the Haystack

2000

US

Training Lanza PRIMER: Beyond the Internet (Slides)

2000

US

Training Lanza PRIMER: Beyond the Internet (Text)

2000

US

Training Rodriguez PRIMER: Briefing on DIALOG

2000

US

Training Rodriguez PRIMER: Chart Comparing DIALOG to Internet (At the Time)

2000

US

Training Sacks PRIMER: Primary Research

2000

US

Training Sandman PRIMER  Applied Human Intelligence

2000

US

Training Snowden PRIMER: Geospatial Intelligence Options

2000

US

Training Soule & Ryan PRIMER: Gray Literature 3: Technical Briefing

2000

US

Training Steele PRIMER: A Few Thoughts on the Internet (At the Time)

2000

US

Training Webb & Steele PRIMER: Integrated Analytic Toolkit Requirements

1997 Davis A Compendium of Analytic Tradecraft Notes

Analysis, Analysis, Historic Contributions
Jack Davis
Jack Davis

PLATINUM Jack Davis, Virtual Dean of US All-Source Analytic Corps

For over three decades, Jack Davis has been the heir to Sherman Kent and the mentor to all those who would strive to be the world’s most effective all-source intelligence analysts.  As a Central Intelligence Agency analyst and educator, he combines intellect, integrity, insight, and an insatiable appetite for interaction with all manner of individuals regardless of rank and disposition.  He is the most able pioneer of “analytic tradecraft,” the best proponent for the value of human analysis over technical processing, and one of those very special individuals who helped define the end of 20th Century centralized analysis and the beginning of 21st Century distributed multinational multiagency analysis.

Note: Awarded in advance of IOP ’07 to celebrate Jack Davis’ 50th uninterrupted year as an all-source analyst and mentor to all analysts.

The Compendium is 45 pages in all and consists of a Foreword, Summary, and then ten Notes to Analysts:

Jack Davis
Jack Davis

Note 1:  Addressing US Interests in DI Assessments

Note 2: Access and Crediblity

Note 3: Articulation of Assumptions

Note 4: Outlook

Note 5: Facts and Sourcing

Note 6: Analytic Expertise

Note 7: Effective Summary

Note 8: Implementation Analysis

Note 9: Conclusions

Note 10: Tradecraft and Counterintelligence