The Library of Utility

01 Agriculture, 01 Poverty, 02 Diplomacy, 02 Infectious Disease, 03 Environmental Degradation, 04 Education, 04 Inter-State Conflict, 05 Energy, 07 Health, 08 Proliferation, 11 Society, 12 Water, Earth Intelligence, History, Threats, Uncategorized
Lucius

“I imagine a library atop a remote mountain that collects the essential information needed to re-learn practical knowledge essential to civilization. This depot, open to anyone who journeys there, is the cultural equivalent of the Svalbard seed bank, a vault on the Arctic Circle that holds frozen seeds of crop plants from around the world. The utilitarian documents in this vault would be the seeds of culture, able to sprout again if needed. It would be the Library of Utility, and it would serve as civilization’s backup.”

Kevin Kelly – Author of   What Technology Wants.

Read the article The Library of Utility on the Blog of the Long Now Foundation.

See Also:

Worth a Look: Book Reviews on Civilization-Building

Worth a Look: Book Reviews on Conscious, Evolutionary, Integral Activism & Goodness

Review (Guest): What Technology Wants

5 Star, Change & Innovation, Culture, Research, Information Society, Information Technology, Nature, Diet, Memetics, Design, Science & Politics of Science, Technology (Bio-Mimicry, Clean)
Amazon Page

Kevin Kelly

From Booklist:  Verbalizing visceral feelings about technology, whether attraction or repulsion, Kelly explores the “technium,” his term for the globalized, interconnected stage of technological development. Arguing that the processes creating the technium are akin to those of biological evolution, Kelly devotes the opening sections of his exposition to that analogy, maintaining that the technium exhibits a similar tendency toward self-organizing complexity. Having defined the technium, Kelly addresses its discontents, as expressed by the Unabomber (although Kelly admits to trepidation in taking seriously the antitechnology screeds of a murderer) and then as lived by the allegedly technophobic Amish. From his observations and discussions with some Amish people, Kelly extracts some precepts of their attitudes toward gadgets, suggesting folk in the secular world can benefit from the Amish approach of treating tools as servants of self and society rather than as out-of-control masters. Exploring ramifications of technology on human welfare and achievement, Kelly arrives at an optimistic outlook that will interest many, coming, as it does, from the former editor of Wired magazine. –Gilbert Taylor

5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating look at how technology evolves, October 14, 2010

WHAT TECHNOLOGY WANTS offers a highly readable investigation into the mechanisms by which technology advances over time. The central thesis of the book is that technology grows and evolves in much the same way as an autonomous, living organism.

The book draws many parallels between technical progress and biology, labeling technology as “evolution accelerated.” Kelly goes further and argues that neither evolution nor technological advance result from a random drift but instead have an inherent direction that makes some outcomes virtually inevitable. Examples of this inevitability include the eye, which evolved independently at least six times in different branches of the animal kingdom, and numerous instances of technical innovations or scientific discoveries being made almost simultaneously.

Continue reading “Review (Guest): What Technology Wants”

Whole Earth Review Archives on Public Intelligence (Historical)

Whole Earth Review

1992

US

Whole Earth RBrandArmy Green

1992

US

Whole Earth RKapor et alWe Need a National Public Network

1992

US

Whole Earth RKleinerThe Co-Evolution of Governance

1992

US

Whole Earth RPetersenWill the Military Miss the Market

1992

US

Whole Earth RStaple & DixonTelegeography: Mapping the New World Order

1992

US

Whole Earth RSteeleE3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1992

US

Whole Earth RTibbsIndustrial Ecology: An Environmental Agenda for Industry

1991

US

Whole Earth RBrilliantComputer Conferencing: The Global Connection

1991

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Whole Earth RClayGenes, Genius, and Genocide

1991

US

Whole Earth RElginConscious Democracy Through Electronic Town Meetings

1991

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Whole Earth RGarciaAssessing the Impacts of Technology

1991

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Whole Earth RGodwinThe Electronic Frontier Foundation and Virtual Communities

1991

US

Whole Earth RKarrakerHighways of the Mind

1991

US

Whole Earth RLovins & LovinsWinning the Peace

1991

US

Whole Earth RMarxPrivacy & Technology

1991

US

Whole Earth RMeeksThe Global Commons

1991

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Whole Earth RRheingoldElectronic Democracy: The Great Equalizer

1991

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Whole Earth RSchumanReclaiming our Technological Future

1991

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Whole Earth RWarren & RheingoldAccess to Political Tools: Effective Citizen Action

1991

US

Whole Earth RWhiteEarthtrust: Electronic Mail and Ecological Activism

1991

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Whole Earth RWhitney-SmithInformation Doesn’t Want

1991

US

Whole Earth RWittigElectronic City Hall

1990

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Whole Earth RBarlowCrime and Puzzlement: The Advance of the Law on the Electronic Frontier

1990

US

Whole Earth RBrandOutlaws, Musicians, Lovers, and Spies: The Future of Control

1990

US

Whole Earth RDodgeLife Work

1990

JP

Whole Earth RIshiiCross-Cultural Communications & Computer-Supported Cooperative Work

1990

US

Whole Earth RJordon IIIRestoration: Shaping the Land, Transforming the Spirit

1990

JP

Whole Earth RKumonToward Co-Emulation: Japan and the United States in the Information Age

1990

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Whole Earth RMonschkeHow to Heal the Land

1990

US

Whole Earth RShapardObservations on Cross-Cultural Electronic Networking

1990

US

Whole Earth RVidalFounding Father Knows Best

1989

US

Whole Earth RBermanThe Gesture of Balance

1989

US

Whole Earth RGarfinkleSocial Security Numbers: And Other Telling Information

1989

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Whole Earth RHaightLiving in the Office

1989

US

Whole Earth RHorvitzThe USENET Underground

1989

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Whole Earth RJaffeHello, Central: Phone Conferencing Tips

1989

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Whole Earth RJohnson`The Portable Office

1989

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Whole Earth RRheingoldEthnobotany: The Search for Vanishing Knowledge

1988

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Whole Earth RBaker, S.Gossip

1988

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Whole Earth RBaker, W.Gossip

1988

US

Whole Earth RBrandThe Information Wants to Be Free Strategy

1988

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Whole Earth RCoateTales from Two Communities: The Well and the Farm

1988

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Whole Earth RFergusonGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RFieldsGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RHardinGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RHawkinsComputer Parasites & Remedies–A Catalog of First Sightings

1988

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Whole Earth RKeenGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RKleinerGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RLearyGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RNelsonGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RNewroeDistance Learning

1988

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Whole Earth RPertThe Material Basis of Emotions with Inset, Mind as Information

1988

US

Whole Earth RRappaportGossip

1988

US

Whole Earth RThurow & WalshGetting Over the Information Economy

1987

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Whole Earth RDonaldsonAn Incomplete History of Microcomputing

1987

US

Whole Earth RHensonMEMETICS: The Science of Information Viruses

1987

US

Whole Earth RHorvitzAn Intelligent Guide to Intelligence

1987

US

Whole Earth RKrauseBio-Acoustics: Habitat Ambience & Ecological Balance

1987

US

Whole Earth RRobertsElectronic Cottage on Wheels

1986

US

Whole Earth RFend & GuntherWhat Have You Got to Hide: Iraq Iran Basra Abadan

1986

US

Whole Earth RMinskySociety of Mind

1986

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Whole Earth RSandersEtiquette for the Age of Transparency

1986

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Whole Earth RScxhwartz & BrandThe World Information Economy

1986

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Whole Earth RThompsonA Gaian Politics

1985

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Whole Earth RBrand, Kelly, KinneyDigital Retouching: The End of Photography as Evidence of Anything

1985

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Whole Earth RHunterPublic Image

1985

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Whole Earth RKleinerThe Health Hazards of Computers: A Guide to Worrying Intelligently

1985

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Whole Earth RManderSix Grave Doubts About Computers

1983

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Whole Earth RIllichSilence is a Commons: Computers Are Doing to Communication What …

1982

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Whole Earth RBrandUncommon Courtesy: A School of Compassionate Skills

1982

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Whole Earth RKayesForce Without Power: A Doctrine of Unarmed Military Service

1982

US

Whole Earth RMeadowsWhole Earth Models & Systems

Commerce Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Commerce
Archive 1992-2006
Archive 1992-2006

2004

SE

CommerceBjoreCommercial Intelligence

2003

SE

CommerceBjoreReinventing Commercial Intelligence

2002

US

CommerceKlavansIdentifying Commercial Opportunities from Emerging Science

2000

US

CommerceTechnology Intelligence from Patents

2000

US

CommerceSullivanBusiness Perspective on Essential Overseas Information

1999

FR

CommerceBaumlinEspionage or Business Intelligence: Nuances of Gray

1999

UK

CommerceCollierOverview of New Horizons in OSINT Sources, Softwares, Services

1999

US

CommerceMillerThe Year the Information Industry Hit Bottom

1999

US

CommerceRobinsonHow Mobil Uses Open Sources & Services

1998

FR

CommerceBaumlinBlack, White, Gray, Realities of the Investigative Marketplace

1998

US

CommerceBoyerAssessing US and Other Space Imaging Options for European Needs

1998

GE

CommerceBrucknerInformation and Knowledge Management in Intelligence Situations

1998

US

CommerceBurwellCommercial Online Source Validation Methods

1998

UK

CommerceCollierThe Pricing of Electronic Information

1998

US

CommerceDunnConfronting the Future of the Information Industry

1998

Israel

CommerceFeilerOpen and Personal: Economic Intelligence in the Middle East

1998

US

CommerceHorowitzEconomic Espionage and OSINT: Legal and Security Implications

1998

US

CommerceStaraValuing Competitive Intelligence

1998

US

CommerceYankeelovPushing the Assets of Time and Knowledge

1997

BE

CommerceBorry & SohlElectronic Sources & Methods: A Belgian Business Perspective

1997

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CommerceSuggsInternational Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Slides)

1997

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CommerceSuggsInternational Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Text)

1996

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CommerceBatesRecent and Emerging Trends in Information Brokering

1996

US

CommerceCallRealities & Myths Regarding Financial Research Using Open Sources

1996

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CommerceKolb (SCIP)Sales Pitch for the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals

1996

US

CommerceSibbitEmerging Business Models for Commercial Remote Sensing

1996

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CommerceSteeleConcise Directory of Selected International Open Sources & Services

1996

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CommerceSteeleOpen Source Intelligence Handbook, Chapter 1, Overview

1995

US

CommerceHerringBusiness Intelligence in Japan and Sweden: Lessons for the US

1995

US

CommerceHerringIntelligence to Enhance American Companies’ Competitiveness

1995

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CommerceHerringUsing the Intelligence Process to Create Competitive Global Advantage

1995

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CommerceSimon & BlixtEmerging Issues in Competitive Intelligence

1994

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CommerceBaschSecrets of the Super-Searchers: A Personal and Practical Perspective

1994

Switz

CommerceBernhardtTailoring Competitive Intelligence to Executive Needs

1994

UK

CommerceCollierGlobal Information Industry and a New Information Paradigm

1994

US

CommerceHimelfarbIntroduction to Competitive and Business Intelligence

1994

US

CommerceKellyASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (S)

1994

US

CommerceKellyASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (T)

1994

US

CommerceMarcinkoAssociation of Information and Dissemination Centers, Case Studies

1994

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CommerceShakerBeating the Competition: From Boardroom to War Room

1994

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CommerceShaker & RiceFrom War Room to Board Room

1994

US

CommerceSharpHow to Identify Changes that Threaten Your Business Activity, In Advance

1994

US

CommerceStanatThe Power of Global Business Information

1994

US

CommerceSteeleGermany: ACCESS:  Theory and Practice of Competitor Intelligence

1994?

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CommerceSteeleASIDIC: Intelligence Community as a New Market

1993

US

CommerceCaldwellInternational Investigative Market (Slides)

1993

US

CommerceCaldwellInternational Investigative Market (Text)

1993

SE

CommerceDedijerEurope’s To BI or not to BE: Inventory of a New Business Innovation

1993

US

CommerceEliasAn Overview of the Information Industry in 1993

1993

AU

CommerceFraumannBusiness is War

1993

US

CommerceHerringBusiness Intelligence: Some Have It, Some Don’t–How They Do It

1993

US

CommerceHimelfarbIntelligence Requirements for Executives

1993

US

CommerceMonaco & GerliczyEconomic Intelligence and Open Source Information

1993

JP

CommerceShimaOverview of Japanese Media and Information Systems

1993

US

CommerceSplittThe U.S. Information Industry: Changing the 21st Century

1993

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CommerceSteeleCorporate Role in National Competitiveness

1993

US

CommerceSteeleThe Intelligence Community as a New Market

1992

US

CommerceHlavaInformation Industry Corporations (Partial Listing)

1992

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CommerceHlavaSelected Professional and Trade Associations in Information

1992

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CommerceHlavaThe Information Industry: Impact of Globalization

1992

US

CommerceMeyerBusiness Intelligence at the Cutting Edge

1992

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CommerceNobelFrom A to Z: What We’ve Done with Open Sources

1992

US

CommerceShaker & KarduliasIntelligence Support to U.S. Business

1992

US

CommerceWilliamsOSINT to Create Intelligence in a Commercial Environment

Who’s Who in Cultural Intelligence: Kevin Kelly

Alpha I-L, Cultural Intelligence
Kevin Kelly
Kevin Kelly

Kevin Kelly has been a participant of, and reporter on, the information technology revolution for the past 20 years. Based in his studio in Pacifica, California, he immerses himself in the long-term trends of technology, tools, new media, and cultural behavior. He writes about the ripple effects and social consequences surrounding the culture of technology. Kevin Kelly is currently Senior Maverick at Wired magazine. He helped launch Wired in 1993, and served as its Executive Editor until January 1999. During Kelly’s tenure as editor at Wired, the magazine won two National Magazine Awards (the industry’s equivalent of two Oscars). He is also currently editor and publisher of the Cool Tools website, which gets 1 million visitors per month. From 1984-1990, Kevin was publisher and editor of the Whole Earth Review, a journal of unorthodox technical news. He co-founded the ongoing Hackers’ Conference, and was involved with the launch of the WELL, a pioneering online service started in 1985. He authored the best-selling New Rules for the New Economy, and the classic book on decentralized emergent systems, Out of Control (called “required reading for all executives” by Fortune). In addition, he writes for prominent publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Time, Harpers, Science, GQ, and Esquire. Earlier in life, Kevin was a photographer in remote parts of Asia (instead of going to college), publishing his photographs in national magazines and recently in the photo art book Asia Grace.