Reference: Department of State Language Gaps

02 Diplomacy, General Accountability Office, Key Players, Methods & Process, Peace Intelligence, Tools
GAO on State Language Gaps
GAO on State Language Gaps

Phi Beta Iota: The  Department of State (State), which should be the primary interface between the Republic, it’s policy, acquisition, and operations communities, and the rest of the world, has fewer diplomats than the Department of Defense (DoD) has military musicians; and continues to suffer persistent staffing and foreign language gaps that “compromise diplomatic readiness” according to the General Accountability Office (GAO).

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Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]

Analysis, Budgets & Funding, Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Ethics, InfoOps (IO), Key Players, Methods & Process, Mobile, Policies, Policy, Real Time, Reform, Searches, Strategy, Technologies, Threats, Tools
COIN20 Trip Report
Paradise Found

The future of OSINT is M4IS2.

The future of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) is Multinational, Multifunctional, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing & Sense-Making (M4IS2).

The following, subject to the approval of Executive and Congressional leadership, are suggested hueristics (rules of thumb):

Rule 1: All Open Source Information (OSIF) goes directly to the high side (multinational top secret) the instant it is received at any level by any civilian or military element responsive to global OSINT grid.  This includes all of the contextual agency and mission specific information from the civilian elements previously stove-piped or disgarded, not only within the US, but ultimately within all 90+ participating nations.

Rule 2: In return for Rule 1, the US IC agrees that the Department of State (and within DoD, Civil Affairs) is the proponent outside the wire, and the sharing of all OSIF originating outside the US IC is at the discretion of State/Civil Affairs without secret world caveat or constraint.  OSIF collected by US IC elements is NOT included in this warrant.

Continue reading “Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]”

Who’s Who in Peace Intelligence: Patrick J. Cammaert

Alpha A-D, Peace Intelligence

Patrick C. Cammaert is a major-general of the Marine Corps of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Since early 2003 he is Military Advisor to the Secretary-general of the United Nations. Until October 2002 he was in command of the United Nations Mission to Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE). Before commanding UNMEE, general Cammaert served as Commander of the Multinational United Nations Stand-by Forces High Readiness Brigade (SHIRBRIG) and as battalion commander with the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC) and as assistant chief of staff of the Multinational Brigade of the Rapid Reaction Force of the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR).

Intelligence in Peacekeeping Operations: Lessons for the Future

The Book
The Book

Geospatial Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Geospatial
CD  Needs for PKI
CD Needs for PKI

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewSudan Tactical Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewLiberia Tactical Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewIvory Coast Tactical Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewDRC Congo Russian Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewDRC Congo Large Scale Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewDRC Congo NIMA 250K Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewDRC Congo National 200K Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewBurundi Tactical Map Availability

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewAfghanistan Military Maps

2005

US

GeospatialEast ViewEastern Congo Priority Tactical Map Deficiencies

2004

US

GeospatialEast ViewAceh Indonesia 1:50,000 Tactical Map Availability

2004

US

GeospatialEast ViewAceh Indonesia 1:250,000 Large Scale Map Availabiility

2003

US

GeospatialEast ViewIraq Post-Conflict Map Availability

2003

US

GeospatialNAPAGeographic Information for the 21st Century

1999

US

GeospatialSteeleReal-World Mapping Shortfalls (Two Slides)

UN-NGO Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Non-Governmental
Archives 1992-2006
Archives 1992-2006

2006

US

NGONoneDraft Legislation to Establish Department of Peace

2006

SE

NGOSalinPeacekeeping Intelligence Training

2006

US

NGOSteelePeacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping 1.3

2006

SE

NGOSvenssonSwedish Peacekeeping Intelligence Curriculum

2006

SE

NGOSvenssonSwedish Peacekeeping Intelligence Course Description

2006

US

NGOTillmanDepartment of Peace (Kucinich Supports)

2006

US

NGOTillmanPeace Trip

2004

US

NGOSchellReview of Unconquerable World by Richard Falk

2004

US

NGOSteelePKI III: Peacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping

2004

US

NGOSteeleSweden: Peacekeeping Intelligence & Information Peacekeeping

2003

AF

NGOBrahimiBrahimi Report Extracts Relevant to UN/NGO Intelligence Function

2003

NL

NGOCammaertComments on Intelligence and Peacekeeping

2003

US

NGOSteelePeacekeeping Intelligence Leadership Guidance 1.0

2003

US

NGOSteeleInformation Peacekeeping & The Future of Intelligence

2003

US

NGOSteele et alPeacekeeping Intelligence Leadership Digest 1.0

2002

US

NGOSteeleNetherlands: Information Peacekeeping & The Future of Intelligence

2002

US

NGOSteeleNetherlands Keynote on Information Peacekeeping

2000

CA

NGOChartersOSINT for Peace Operations: Perspectives from UN Operations

2000

UN

NGOChitumbo et alNuclear Transparency through Open Source Intelligence (Slides)

2000

UN

NGOChitumbo et alNuclear Transparency through Open Source Intelligence (Text)

1999

US

NGODearthPeacekeeping in the Information Age

1999

Switz

NGOFuchsSummary of 1994 Remarks on Red Cross OSINT

1999

UN

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Participants

1999

US

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Background Paper

1999

US

NGOGDINProposal to Increase Information Sharing Through ReliefWeb

1999

US

NGORhoaderPeace Wing

1999

AU

NGOSmithIntelligence and UN Peacekeeping

1998

US

NGOGDINBackground on Meeting of Disaster Relief Experts

1998

US

NGOGDINGlobal Disaster Information Network Conference Concept Paper

1996

US

NGOAir ForcePeacespace Dominance

1994

Switz

NGOFuchsComplete Remarks of the Director General of the Red Cross

1994

Switz

NGOFuchsHandling Information in Humanitarian Operations Within Armed Conflicts

1993

US

NGOSteeleInformation Peacekeeping: A Note

1993

US

NGOWhitney-SmithToward an Epistemology of Peace

2003 Cammaert (NL) Reflections on Peace Intelligence with the Military Advisor to the Secretary General of the United Nations

Historic Contributions, Military, Non-Governmental, Peace Intelligence

Patrick Cammaert
Patrick Cammaert

The Netherlands, MajGen Patrick Cammaert, Royal Marines

IOP ’06.  MajGen Cammaert is recognized for his extraordinarily diplomatic and diligent furtherance of common sense and understanding at the highest levels of United Nations leadership, with respect to both the generic value of the process of intelligence to peacekeeping and conflict avoidance, and the specific value of open sources of information, including geospatial information, useful to the strategic mandate, the operational force composition, and the tactical campaign.  As Military Advisor to the Secretary General from 2003-2005, and then as Force Commander of UN Forces in the Congo, he devised and began implementation of the regional United Nations Joint Military Analysis Centre (UN JMAC) program.  His leadership with respect to a common standard of intelligence training for all UN civilian and uniformed personnel are likely to have a considerable impact on the future effectiveness of peacekeeping operations

Although the Brahimi Report (AF) and the efforts of Louise Frechette (CA) as Deputy Secretary General to achieve strategic decision-support coherence were both important, no single person has done more to help the United Nations understand that intelligence is not a “dirty word” but rather an essential tool relevant to the strategic level (getting the mandate right), the operational level (getting the force structure right), and the tactical level (being effective in multicultural environments). Below are his responses to questions, as presented on a video interview done in New York.

Patrick Cammaert
Patrick Cammaert