Who’s Who in Collective Intelligence: Howard Rheingold

Alpha Q-U, Collective Intelligence
Howard Rheingold
Howard Rheingold

Howard Rheingold may well have been the first pioneer to fall down into the chasm of cyberspace and the write about it.  As Editor of the Whole Earth Review, following in the footsteps of founder Stewart Brand, he has consistently been on the bleeding edge of both righteous living for a Whole Earth, and the bleeding edge of technology and the human mind.  Below are links to his books, the first of which, Tools for Thinking, catalyzed deep soul-searching within the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) which at the time (1986) had nothing to offer such as Howard envisioned.  He was, with John Perry Barlow, one of the two speakers at OSS ’92 who challenged virtually every aspect of the secret intelligence paradigm.

A slice of life in my virtual community

Rheingold at OSS ’92

The Book
The Book

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Whole Earth Review Archives on Public Intelligence (Historical)

Whole Earth Review

1992

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Whole Earth RBrandArmy Green

1992

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Whole Earth RKapor et alWe Need a National Public Network

1992

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Whole Earth RKleinerThe Co-Evolution of Governance

1992

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Whole Earth RPetersenWill the Military Miss the Market

1992

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Whole Earth RStaple & DixonTelegeography: Mapping the New World Order

1992

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Whole Earth RSteeleE3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1992

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Whole Earth RTibbsIndustrial Ecology: An Environmental Agenda for Industry

1991

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Whole Earth RBrilliantComputer Conferencing: The Global Connection

1991

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Whole Earth RClayGenes, Genius, and Genocide

1991

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Whole Earth RElginConscious Democracy Through Electronic Town Meetings

1991

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Whole Earth RGarciaAssessing the Impacts of Technology

1991

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Whole Earth RGodwinThe Electronic Frontier Foundation and Virtual Communities

1991

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Whole Earth RKarrakerHighways of the Mind

1991

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Whole Earth RLovins & LovinsWinning the Peace

1991

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Whole Earth RMarxPrivacy & Technology

1991

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Whole Earth RMeeksThe Global Commons

1991

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Whole Earth RRheingoldElectronic Democracy: The Great Equalizer

1991

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Whole Earth RSchumanReclaiming our Technological Future

1991

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Whole Earth RWarren & RheingoldAccess to Political Tools: Effective Citizen Action

1991

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Whole Earth RWhiteEarthtrust: Electronic Mail and Ecological Activism

1991

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Whole Earth RWhitney-SmithInformation Doesn’t Want

1991

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Whole Earth RWittigElectronic City Hall

1990

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Whole Earth RBarlowCrime and Puzzlement: The Advance of the Law on the Electronic Frontier

1990

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Whole Earth RBrandOutlaws, Musicians, Lovers, and Spies: The Future of Control

1990

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Whole Earth RDodgeLife Work

1990

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Whole Earth RIshiiCross-Cultural Communications & Computer-Supported Cooperative Work

1990

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Whole Earth RJordon IIIRestoration: Shaping the Land, Transforming the Spirit

1990

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Whole Earth RKumonToward Co-Emulation: Japan and the United States in the Information Age

1990

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Whole Earth RMonschkeHow to Heal the Land

1990

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Whole Earth RShapardObservations on Cross-Cultural Electronic Networking

1990

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Whole Earth RVidalFounding Father Knows Best

1989

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Whole Earth RBermanThe Gesture of Balance

1989

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Whole Earth RGarfinkleSocial Security Numbers: And Other Telling Information

1989

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Whole Earth RHaightLiving in the Office

1989

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Whole Earth RHorvitzThe USENET Underground

1989

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Whole Earth RJaffeHello, Central: Phone Conferencing Tips

1989

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Whole Earth RJohnson`The Portable Office

1989

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Whole Earth RRheingoldEthnobotany: The Search for Vanishing Knowledge

1988

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Whole Earth RBaker, S.Gossip

1988

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Whole Earth RBaker, W.Gossip

1988

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Whole Earth RBrandThe Information Wants to Be Free Strategy

1988

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Whole Earth RCoateTales from Two Communities: The Well and the Farm

1988

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Whole Earth RFergusonGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RFieldsGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RHardinGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RHawkinsComputer Parasites & Remedies–A Catalog of First Sightings

1988

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Whole Earth RKeenGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RKleinerGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RLearyGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RNelsonGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RNewroeDistance Learning

1988

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Whole Earth RPertThe Material Basis of Emotions with Inset, Mind as Information

1988

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Whole Earth RRappaportGossip

1988

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Whole Earth RThurow & WalshGetting Over the Information Economy

1987

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Whole Earth RDonaldsonAn Incomplete History of Microcomputing

1987

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Whole Earth RHensonMEMETICS: The Science of Information Viruses

1987

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Whole Earth RHorvitzAn Intelligent Guide to Intelligence

1987

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Whole Earth RKrauseBio-Acoustics: Habitat Ambience & Ecological Balance

1987

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Whole Earth RRobertsElectronic Cottage on Wheels

1986

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Whole Earth RFend & GuntherWhat Have You Got to Hide: Iraq Iran Basra Abadan

1986

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Whole Earth RMinskySociety of Mind

1986

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Whole Earth RSandersEtiquette for the Age of Transparency

1986

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Whole Earth RScxhwartz & BrandThe World Information Economy

1986

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Whole Earth RThompsonA Gaian Politics

1985

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Whole Earth RBrand, Kelly, KinneyDigital Retouching: The End of Photography as Evidence of Anything

1985

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Whole Earth RHunterPublic Image

1985

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Whole Earth RKleinerThe Health Hazards of Computers: A Guide to Worrying Intelligently

1985

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Whole Earth RManderSix Grave Doubts About Computers

1983

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Whole Earth RIllichSilence is a Commons: Computers Are Doing to Communication What …

1982

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Whole Earth RBrandUncommon Courtesy: A School of Compassionate Skills

1982

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Whole Earth RKayesForce Without Power: A Doctrine of Unarmed Military Service

1982

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Whole Earth RMeadowsWhole Earth Models & Systems

Technologies Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Technologies

2006

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TechnologyArnoldThe Google Legacy

2005

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TechnologyCISCOCISCO Application Oriented Network One-Pager

2005

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TechnologyCISCOCISCO Application Oriented Network Executive IT Overview

2005

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TechnologySteeleGSA Roundtable on IT Innovation

2004

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TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Presentation

2004

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TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Architecture and Applications

2004

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TechnologyAnonymousSemantic Web Non-Memo

2004

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TechnologyArnoldThe Information Technology Marketplace

2004

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TechnologyArnoldTable of Contents for Enterprise Search Book

2004

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TechnologyGAOReport on the Global Information Grid and DoD

2004

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TechnologyGillOpen Spectrum as the Third Open

2004

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TechnologyGillWireless Grid: The Possibilities

2004

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TechnologyGuestCommentary on GAO Report on DoD Global Information Grid

2004

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TechnologySteeleCommentary of GAO Report on DoD Global Information Grid

2003

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TechnologyArnoldOne Machine…One View

2003

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TechnologyHockThe Open-ness of the Internet

2002

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TechnologyArnoldNomadic Computing

2002

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TechnologySteeleNSA in Las Vegas: New Craft: What Should the T Be Doing to the I in IT?

2002

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TechnologySteeleNSA in Las Vegas: New Craft (Alternative Copy)

2002

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TechnologyStrattonIn-Q-Tel

1999

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TechnologyArnoldIntelligence Management and the Bottom Line

1998

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TechnologyArnoldThe Changing Intelligence Environment

1998

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TechnologyArnoldThe Future of Online

1997

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TechnologyArnoldTechnology Vectors: 1998 and Beyond

1997

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TechnologyManiMITRE: Search Engine Technologies

1997

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TechnologyMayburyMITRE: Knowledge Management

1996

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TechnologyRuhOptimizing Corporate Capital Through Information Technology

1994

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TechnologyEnglebartToward High-Performance Organizations: A Strategic Role for Groupware

1992

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TechnologyMcConnellThe Future Federal Information Infrastructure

1992

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TechnologyRheingoldTools for Thinking & Virtual Reality: Our Info EcoSystem

1988

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TechnologySteeleGeneric Intelligence Center Production Requirements

Review: Smart Mobs–The Next Social Revolution

5 Star, Change & Innovation, Consciousness & Social IQ, Culture, Research, Democracy, Information Society, Intelligence (Collective & Quantum), Intelligence (Public), Intelligence (Wealth of Networks)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Describes the Techno-Powered Popular Revolution,

November 11, 2002
Howard Rheingold
At the very end of the book, the author quotes James Madison as carved into the marble of the Library of Congress: “…a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” And there it is–Howard Rheingold has documented the next level of the Internet, in which kids typing 60 words a minute with one thumb, “swarms” of people converging on a geospatial node guided only by their cell phones; virtual “CIAs” coming together overnight to put together massive (and accurate) analysis with which to take down a corporate or government position that is fradulent–this is the future and it is bright.As I go back through the book picking out highlights, a few of the following serve to capture the deep rich story being told by this book–breakthroughs coming from associations of amateurs rather than industry leaders; computer-mediated trust brokers–collective action driven by reputation; detailed minute-by-minute information about behaviors of entire populations (or any segment thereof); texting as kid privacy from adult hearing; the end of the telephone number as relevant information; the marriage of geospatial and lifestyle/preference information to guide on the street behavior; the perennial problem of “free riders” and how groups can constrain them; distributed processing versus centralized corporate lawyering; locations with virtual information; shirt labels with their transportation as well as cleaning history (and videos of the sex partners?)–this is just mind-boggling.

Finally, the author deserves major credit for putting all this techno-marvel stuff into a deep sociological and cultural context. He carefully considers the major issues of privacy, control, social responsibility, and group behavior. He ends on very positive notes, but also notes that time is running out–we have to understand where all this is going, and begin to change how we invest and how we design everything from our clothing to our cities to our governments.

This is an affirming book–the people that pay taxes can still look forward to the day when they might take back control of their government and redirect benefits away from special interests and back toward the commonwealth. Smart mobs, indeed.

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Review: Tools for Thought–The History and Future of Mind-Expanding Technolog

5 Star, Consciousness & Social IQ, Decision-Making & Decision-Support, Intelligence (Commercial), Intelligence (Public)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Rheingold 10, Gates 0,

December 29, 2000
Howard Rheingold

Howard Rheingold, former Editor of the Whole Earth Review and one of the pure-gold original thinkers in the Stewart Brand and Kevin Kelly circle, lays down a serious challange to both decisionmakers and software producers that has yet to be fully understood. Originally published in 1985, this book was a “must read” at the highest levels of advanced information processing circles then, but sadly its brilliant and coherent message has yet to take hold–largely because bureaucratic budgets and office politics are major obstacles to implementing new models where the focus is on empowering the employee rather than crunching financial numbers.

This book is a foundation reading for understanding why the software Bill Gates produces (and the Application Program Interfaces he persists in concealing) will never achieve the objectives that Howard and others believe are within our grasp–a desktop toolkit that not only produces multi-media documents without crashing ten times a day, but one that includes modeling & simulation, structured argument analysis, interactive search and retrieval of the deep web as well as commercial online systems, and geospatially-based heterogeneous data set visualization–and more–the desktop toolkit that emerges logically from Howard’s vision must include easy clustering and linking of related data across sets, statistical analysis to reveal anomalies and identify trends in data across time, space, and topic, and a range of data conversion, machine language translation, analog video management, and automated data extraction from text and images. How hard can this be? VERY HARD. Why? Because no one is willing to create a railway guage standard in cyberspace that legally mandates the transparency and stability of Application Program Interfaces (API). Rheingold gets it, Gates does not. What a waste!

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Review: The Virtual Community–Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier

5 Star, Civil Society, Culture, Research, Intelligence (Collective & Quantum)

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Prophet of Electronic Power to the People,

December 29, 2000
Howard Rheingold
Everyone seems to miss what I think is the most important the point of Howard’s book. First published in 1993 and now in the expanded edition, the bottom line on this book is that the Internet has finally made it possible for individuals to own the fruits of their own labor–the power has shifted from the industrial age aggregators of labor, capital, and hard resources to the individual knowledge workers. The virtual community is the social manifestation of this new access to one another, but the real revolution is manifested in the freedom that cyberspace makes possible–as John Perry Barlow has said, the Internet interprets censorship (including corporate attempts to “own” employee knowledge) as an outage, and *routes around it*. Not only are communities possible, but so also are short-term aggregations of interest, remote bartering, on the fly hiring of world-class experts at a fraction of their “physical presence price”. If Howard’s first big book, Tools for Thought, was the window on what is possible at the desktop, this book is the window on what is possible in cyberspace, transcending physical, legal, cultural, and financial barriers. This is not quite the watershed that The Communist Manifesto was, but in many ways this book foreshadowed all of the netgain, infinite wealth, and other electronic frontier books coming out of the fevered brains around Boston–a guy in Mill Valley wearing hand-painted cowboy boots was there long before those carpetbaggers (smile).
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Review: Virtual Reality–The Revolutionary Technology of Computer-Generated Artificial Worlds – and How It Promises to Transform Society

5 Star, Asymmetric, Cyber, Hacking, Odd War, Change & Innovation, Complexity & Resilience, Consciousness & Social IQ, Culture, Research, Decision-Making & Decision-Support, Education (General), Future, Information Society, Information Technology

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Sacred and Scary Reflections on Neo-Biologicial Civilization,

December 29, 2000
Howard Rheingold
First published in 1991, this is a gem that should be one of the first readings of anyone contemplated the sacred and the scary aspects of how humans, machines, and software are being changed by emerging information technologies. While there is a lot of focus on “cool tools” and all the paraphenalia of “virtual reality” qua artificial sensation and perception, the rock bottom foundation of this book can be found in Howard reflections on what it all means for the transformation of humans, business, and society in general.
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