Review: Creating a Learning Society

4 Star, Banks, Fed, Money, & Concentrated Wealth, Best Practices in Management, Capitalism (Good & Bad), Change & Innovation, Civil Society, Economics
Amazon Page
Amazon Page

Joseph Stiglitz, Bruce Greenwald

4.0 out of 5 stars Glass Half Full — Cannot Be Ignored But Also Off the Rails, September 4, 2014

Among all economists in the English language, I hold Joseph Stiglitz to be among the most enlightened and virtuous. When I formed a “dream” coalition cabinet in 2012, he was on it. His co-author is of less interest to me — finance geeks have been demonstrably impotent these past fifty years — and particularly those who fall prey to mathematical formulas lacking in social integrity — and I believe with book would have been stronger had Stiglitz either gone it alone, or collaborated with an educator such as Derek Bok. The book is also rooted in old lectures, starting in 2008, and it is focused on Kenneth Arrow’s work, which is best appreciated on its own merits. See, for example:

Moral Hazard in Health Insurance (Kenneth J. Arrow Lecture Series)
The Limits of Organization (Fels Lectures on Public Policy Analysis)
General Competitive Analysis, Volume 12 (Advanced Textbooks in Economics)

The weakest point of this book, which does indeed have much to offer for anyone who cares about the future of academia, commerce, governance, and society, is that is “assumes” integrity on the part of the government, and that industrial policies are somehow going to corrupt deep ethical and intellectual failings across all major forms of organization (academia, civil society, commerce, government, law enforcement, media, military, and non-governmental/non-profit). This is the same mistake made by Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update and the Club of Rome. The *losing* alternative to the Limits to Growth assumption that top-down government would deal responsibly with climate change and other high level threats focused instead on education from the bottom up — the central point of Will Durant’s 1919 doctoral thesis, now available as Philosophy and the Social Problem: The Annotated Edition.

Continue reading “Review: Creating a Learning Society”

Worth a Look: No Place to Hide – Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the US Surveillance State

5 Star, America (Founders, Current Situation), Congress (Failure, Reform), Crime (Government), Culture, Research, Democracy, Executive (Partisan Failure, Reform), Impeachment & Treason, Information Society, Information Technology, Intelligence (Government/Secret), Military & Pentagon Power, Power (Pathologies & Utilization), Privacy
Amazon Page
Amazon Page

Glenn Greenwald

No Place to Hide is a groundbreaking look at the NSA surveillance scandal, from the reporter who broke the story

Investigative reporter for The Guardian and bestselling author Glenn Greenwald, provides an in-depth look into the NSA scandal that has triggered a national debate over national security and information privacy. With further revelations from documents entrusted to Glenn Greenwald by Edward Snowden himself, this book explores the extraordinary cooperation between private industry and the NSA, and the far-reaching consequences of the government’s surveillance program, both domestically and abroad.

Continue reading “Worth a Look: No Place to Hide – Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the US Surveillance State”

Journal: End of Empire Begins at Home….

Uncategorized
Chuck Spinney Recommends

FRIDAY, AUG 6, 2010 12:07 ET

What collapsing empire looks like

BY GLENN GREENWALD, Salon

As we enter our ninth year of the War in Afghanistan with an escalated force, and continue to occupy Iraq indefinitely, and feed an endlessly growing Surveillance State, reports are emerging of the Deficit Commission hard at work planning how to cut Social Security, Medicare, and now even to freeze military pay.  But a new New York Times article today illustrates as vividly as anything else what a collapsing empire looks like, as it profiles just a few of the budget cuts which cities around the country are being forced to make.  This is a sampling of what one finds:

Plenty of businesses and governments furloughed workers this year, but Hawaii went further — it furloughed its schoolchildren. Public schools across the state closed on 17 Fridays during the past school year to save money, giving students the shortest academic year in the nation.

Many transit systems have cut service to make ends meet, but Clayton County, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta, decided to cut all the way, and shut down its entire public bus system. Its last buses ran on March 31, stranding 8,400 daily riders.

Even public safety has not been immune to the budget ax. In Colorado Springs, the downturn will be remembered, quite literally, as a dark age: the city switched off a third of its 24,512 streetlights to save money on electricity, while trimming its police force and auctioning off its police helicopters.

There are some lovely photos accompanying the article, including one showing what a darkened street in Colorado looks like as a result of not being able to afford street lights.  Read the article to revel in the details of this widespread misery.  Meanwhile, the tiniest sliver of the wealthiest — the ones who caused these problems in the first place — continues to thrive.

FULL STORY ONLINE

US Gov War on Whistleblowers Intensifying

Government, Intelligence (government), Media, Secrecy & Politics of Secrecy

War on whistle-blowers intensifies

By Glenn Greenwald for Salon.com

see full article here

AP Photo/Charles Dharapak
In this March 19, 2010, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the Patriot Center at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va.

The Obama administration’s war on whistleblowers — whose disclosures are one of the very few remaining avenues for learning what our government actually does — continues to intensify. Last month, the DOJ announced it had obtained an indictment against NSA whistleblower Thomas Drake, who exposed serious waste, abuse and possible illegality. Then, the DOJ re-issued a Bush era subpoena to Jim Risen of The New York Times, demanding the identity of his source who revealed an extremely inept and damaging CIA effort to infiltrate the Iranian nuclear program. And now, as Politico‘s Josh Gerstein reports, an FBI linguist who leaked what he believed to be evidence of lawbreaking is to receive a prison term that is “likely to become the longest ever served by a government employee accused of passing national security secrets to a member of the media.” As Gerstein explains:

[I]t reflects a surprising development: President Barack Obama’s Justice Department has taken a hard line against leakers, and Obama himself has expressed anger about disclosures of national security deliberations in the press. . . .

“They’re going after this at every opportunity and with unmatched vigor,” said Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists, a critic of government classification policy. . . .

Journal: Crazy Conspiracy Memes–Theirs & Ours

08 Wild Cards, Cultural Intelligence, Media

 

Chuck Spinney Recommends

Those irrational, misled, conspiratorial Muslims

BY GLENN GREENWALD, Salon, 26 May 2010 

FULL STORY ONLINE

The New York Times this morning has a particularly lush installment of one of the American media’s most favored, reliable, and self-affirming rituals — it’s time to mock and pity Those Crazy, Primitive, Irrational, Propagandized Muslims and their Wild Conspiracy Theories, which their reckless media and extremists maliciously disseminate in order to generate unfair and unfounded hostility toward the U.S.:
Conspiracy theory is a national sport in Pakistan, where the main players — the United States, India and Israel — change positions depending on the ebb and flow of history. Since 2001, the United States has taken center stage, looming so large in Pakistan’s collective imagination that it sometimes seems to be responsible for everything that goes wrong here. . . . The problem is more than a peculiar domestic phenomenon for Pakistan. It has grown into a narrative of national victimhood that is a nearly impenetrable barrier to any candid discussion of the problems here.  In turn, it is one of the principal obstacles for the United States in its effort to build a stronger alliance with a country to which it gives more than a billion dollars a year in aid.

Initially, it’s worth asking how these “conspiracy theories” compare to this:  from the front page of The New York Times, September 8, 2002: 

More than a decade after Saddam Hussein agreed to give up weapons of mass destruction, Iraq has stepped up its quest for nuclear weapons and has embarked on a worldwide hunt for materials to make an atomic bomb, Bush administration officials said today. . . . In the last 14 months, Iraq has sought to buy thousands of specially designed aluminum tubes, which American officials believe were intended as components of centrifuges to enrich uranium. . . . An Iraqi defector said Mr. Hussein had also heightened his efforts to develop new types of chemical weapons. An Iraqi opposition leader also gave American officials a paper from Iranian intelligence indicating that Mr. Hussein has authorized regional commanders to use chemical and biological weapons to put down any Shiite Muslim resistance that might occur if the United States attacks.

From the front page of The Washington Post, April 3, 2003:

AND MANY MORE EXAMPLES–A MUST READ ON IGNORANT CORRUPT US MEDIA

Policy Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Policy

2006

US

PolicyDoDQDR Shift in Focus 18 Years After Gray and Steele Recommended Same

2006

US

PolicyMarkowitzDefense Science Board Report on Transitions (NGO, OSINT)

2006

US

PolicyPetersCounterrevolution in Military Affairs

2006

US

PolicySteeleTerms of Reference for Intelligence Reform 1.1

2006

US

PolicySteeleIn Search of a Leader (Four Essential Reforms)

2006

US

PolicySteeleElectoral Refrom as Precursor to Intelligence Reform

2006

US

PolicyTsuruokaManaging for the Future: Interview with Alvin Toffler

2005

US

PolicyAndreggEthics and the IC: Breaking the Laws of God and Man

2005

UK

PolicyBASICThink Tank Report on US Intelligence Incompetence

2005

EU

PolicyEUEuropean Union Proposed Multi-National Intelligence Service

2005

US

PolicyGodsonCulture of Lawfullness

2005

US

PolicySteeleON INTELLIGENCE: Overview in Aftermath of 9-11

2005

US

PolicySteeleOp-Ed on Condi Rice’s Active Deception

2005

US

PolicySteeleCease and desist letter on Naquin

2005

US

PolicyTamaPrinceton Review on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

PolicyAlexanderArmy G-2 Accepts OSINT as Separate Discipline

2004

US

PolicyAndreggInsanity of Planned Intelligence “Reforms”

2004

AU

PolicyAnon & SteeleUpdate on OSINT in Australia

2004

FR

PolicyClercCognitive Knowledge for Nations

2004

US

PolicyCordesmanQuestions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

PolicyCordesman & SteeleQuestions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

PolicySimmonsCongressman Simmons Letter to General Schoomaker on OSINT

2004

US

PolicySteeleDoD OSINT Program: One Man’s View of What Is Needed

2004

US

PolicySteeleTranscript of Steele at Secretary of State’s Open Forum 24 March 2004

2004

NL

PolicyTongeren (van)Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Complete)

2004

NL

PolicyTongeren (van)Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Overview)

2003

US

PolicyCzechSteady State Revolution and National Security

2003

CA

PolicyFyffeIntelligence Sharing and OSINT

2003

CA

PolicyFyffeIntelligence Sharing and OSINT (Summary)

2003

UN

PolicyLewisCreating the Global Brain

2003

US

PolicyMarkowitzOSINT in Support of All Source

2003

US

PolicyMarkowitzOpen Source Intelligence Investment Strategy

2003

US

PolicySteeleOpen Letter to Ambassadors Accredited to the USA

2003

BE

PolicyTruyensIntelligent vs. Intelligence: That Is The Question

2002

Italy

PolicyPoliti11th of September and the Future of European Intelligence

2001

US

PolicyHeibelIntelligence Training: What Is It?  Who Needs It?

2001

US

PolicyHeibelValue of Intelligence & Intelligence Training to Any Organization

2001

US

PolicyOakleyUse of Civilian & Military Power for Engagement & Intervention

2000

US

PolicyBerkowitzAn Alternative View of the Future of Intellligence

2000

RU

PolicyBudzkoRussian View of Electronic Open Sources and How to Exploit Them

2000

US

PolicyErmarthOSINT: A Fresh Look at the Past and the Future

2000

IT

PolicyPolitiThe Birth of OSINT in Italy

1999

US

PolicyAllen (ADCI/C)OSINT as a Foundation for All-Source Collection Management

1999

UK

PolicyRolingtonChanging Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Slides)

1999

UK

PolicyRolingtonChanging Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Text)

1999

UK

PolicySteeleSnakes in the Grass: Open Source Doctrine

1998

US

PolicyDonahueBalancing Spending Among Spies, Satellites, and Schoolboys

1997

FR

PolicyBotbolThe OSINT Revolution: Early Failures and Future Prospects

1997

US

PolicyFelsherViability & Survivability of US Remote Sensing as Function of Policy

1997

US

PolicySteeleIntelligence in the Balance: Opening Remarks at OSS ‘97

1997

US

PolicySuttonGlobal Coverage ($1.5B/Year Needed for Lower Tier OSINT)

1997

US

PolicyTsuruokaAsian Perceptions of What Is and Is Not Legal in Economic Intelligence

1997

UK

PolicyTyrrellProposals to Develop a NATO/PfP OSINT Capability

1996

FR

PolicyClercEconomic and Financial Intelligence: The French Model

1996

US

PolicyKahinWhat Is Intellectual Property?

1996

US

PolicySteeleCreating a Smart Nation (Govt Info Q and also CYBERWAR Chapter)

1996

US

PolicySteeleInfoPeace: OSINT as a Policy Option & Operational Alternative

1996

US

PolicySteeleOpen Sources and the Virtual Intelligence Community

1996

US

PolicySteeleProtecting the Civilian Infrastructure as an Aspect of Information Warfare

1996

US

PolicyZuckermanThe Central Role of Open Source Economic Intelligence

1995

US

PolicyPrusakSeven Myths of the Information Age

1995

US

PolicySteeleConference Executive Summary C/HPSCI and former DCI Colby

1995

US

PolicySteeleCreating a Smart Nation: Strategy, Policy, Intelligence, & Information

1995

US

PolicySteeleSMART NATIONS: NI Strategies and Virtual Intelligence Communities

1994

US

PolicyOgdin & GiserCyber-Glut, and What To Do About It

1994

FR

PolicySchmidtOpen Source Solutions 1994: The State of Intelligence

1994

US

PolicySchwartauLetter on NII Security

1994

US

PolicySchwartau et alCross-Walk of 3 Experts’ Spending $1 Billion per Year for NII Security

1994

US

PolicySteeleCommunications, Content, Coordination, and C4 Security: Talking Points

1994

US

PolicySteeleCorrespondence to Mr. Marty Harris, NII Commission

1994

US

PolicySteeleDATA MINING: Don’t Buy or Build Your Shovel Until You Know What…

1994

US

PolicySteeleExpansion of Questions Posed by Senator John Warner to Aspin-Brown

1994

US

PolicySteeleLetter to the Open Source Lunch Club on PFIAB Being Useless

1994

US

PolicySteeleNational and Corporate Security in the Age of Information

1994

US

PolicySteelePrivate Enterprise Intelligence: Its Potential Contribution to Nat’l Sec.

1993

FR

PolicyBeaumardFrance: Think-tank to Anticipate & Regulate Economic Intelligence Issues

1993

FR

PolicyBeaumardLearned Nations: Competitive Advantages Via Knowledge Strategies

1993

US

PolicyBrennerLaw and Policy of Telecommunications and Computer Database Networks

1993

US

PolicyCastagnaReview of Reich, The Work of Nations

1993

AU

PolicyChantlerNeed for Australia to Develop a Strategic Policy on OSI

1993

US

PolicyCislerCommunity Computer Networks

1993

US

PolicyCivilleThe Spirit of Access: Equity, NREN, and the NII

1993

US

PolicyFedanzoA Genetic View of National Intelligence

1993

US

PolicyHaverIntelligence Aim Veers to Amassing Overt Information

1993

JP

PolicyKumonJapan and the United States in the Information Age

1993

SE

PolicyLeijonhelmEconomic Intelligence Cooperation Between Government Industry

1993

US

PolicyLoveComments on the Clinton Administration’s ‘Vision’ Statement for the NII

1993

US

PolicyPetersenA New Twenty-First Century Role for the Intelligence Community

1993

GE

PolicySchmidtHistory of Failure, Future of Opportunity: Reinventions and Deja Vu

1993

US

PolicySteeleA Critical Evaluation of U.S. National Security Capabilities

1993

US

PolicySteeleACCESS: Theory and Practice of Intelligence in the Age of Information

1993

US

PolicySteeleExecutive Order 12356, ‘National Security Information’

1993

US

PolicySteeleReinventing Intelligence in the Age of Information (TP for DCI)

1993

US

PolicySteeleReinventing Intelligence: The Advantages of OSINT

1993

US

PolicySteeleRole of Grey Lit & Non-Traditional Agencies in Informing Policy Makers

1993

US

PolicyToffler (Both)Knowledge Strategies, Intellience Restructuring,  Global Competitiveness

1993

US

PolicyWallnerOverview of IC Open Source Requirements and Capabilities

1993

US

PolicyWoodThe IC and the Open Source Information Challenge

1992

US

PolicyBarlowEFF and the National Public Network (NPN)

1992

US

PolicyCastagnaReview of Toffler’s PowerShift

1992

SE

PolicyDedijerOpen Source Solutions: Intelligence and Secrecy

1992

US

PolicyGageOpen Sources, Open Systems

1992

US

PolicyGreenwaldUnrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization: Diplomacy’s Cutting Edge

1992

US

PolicyHughesAn Affordable Approach to Networking America’s Schools

1992

US

PolicyKahinNew Legal Paradigms for Multi-Media Information in Cyberspace

1992

US

PolicyKahnOutline of a Global Knowledge Architecture, Visions and Possibilities

1992

US

PolicySteeleE3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1992

US

PolicySteeleInaugural Remarks Opening 1st International Conference

1992

US

PolicySteeleInformation Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

PolicySteeleOSINT Clarifies Global Threats: Offers Partial Remedy to Budget Cuts

1992

US

PolicySteeleReview Strassmann, Information PayOff

1992

US

PolicyWoodRemarks, Don’t Be Suspicious of Contractors

1991

US

PolicyJFK Working GroupNational Intelligence and the American Enterprise: Possibilities

1991

US

PolicyKarrakerHighways of the Mind

1991

US

PolicySteeleHow to Avoid Strategic Intelligence Failures in the Future

1990

US

PolicySteeleRecasting National Security in a Changing World

1957

US

PolicyWrightProject for a World Intelligence Center