Journal: Tom Atlee Needs Your Help

Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Ethics, Methods & Process, Policy, Reform
Tom Atlee
Tom Atlee

Tom Atlee is the single most important person responsible for introducing Robert Steele to the emerging concepts of Public Intelligence and Collective Intelligence.  Apart from all the books (Smart Mobs, Here Comes Everybody, Groundswell, Army of Davids , Here Comes Everybody, etcetera), it is Tom Atlee who has been the catalyst for convergence across all the issue areas.  He is to People what Paul Ray is to polling.  Tom is the god-father of the American Public Renaissance, and if we do ultimately take back the power and restore sanity to the Republic and the federal government that is a SERVICE, nothing more, it will be because Tom Atlee was himself.  Please support him.  Below are a number of headlines from his latest effort to raise funds for the Co-Intelligence Institute.  Tom Atlee personifies the center of gravity for America the Good.  Please donate as little or as much as you are inspired to give to this national hero.

Continue reading “Journal: Tom Atlee Needs Your Help”

Worth a Look: Public Law 109-163 dated 6 January 2006

Government, Legislation, Military, Policy, Reform, Strategy

Congress tasked the Department of Defense with ten specific OSINT-related tasks that to the best of our knowledge have never been acknowledged nor completed by DoD.

HAC DoD OSINT Tasks
HAC DoD OSINT Tasks

Highlights of the missing ten tasks:

1)  A plan for providing funds

2)  A description of management now and as it could be improved

3)  A description of tools, systems, centers, organizational entities amd procedures

4)  A description of proven tradecraft including operational security

5) A description of OSINT fusion with other disciplines

6)  A description of a training plan and guidance for DoD intelligence personnel

7) A plan to incorporate oversight of OSINT

8] A plan to incorporate the OSINT specialty int oall existing DoD personnel systems;

9) Aplan to utilize reserve personnel; and

10) A plan for the use of the Open Source Information System (OSIS).

Journal: Tech ‘has changed foreign policy’

Best Practices in Management, Civil Society, Decision-Making & Decision-Support, Democracy, Diplomacy, Government, Information Society, Methods & Process, Peace Intelligence, Policy, Technologies
Full Story Online
Full Story Online

Tech’s inroads to a “global society” will influence its governance, Mr Brown said

By Jonathan Fildes

Technology reporter, BBC News, Oxford

Technology means that foreign policy will never be the same again, the prime minister said at a meeting of leading thinkers in Oxford.

The power of technology – such as blogs – meant that the world could no longer be run by “elites”, Mr Brown said.

Policies must instead be formed by listening to the opinions of people “who are blogging and communicating with people around the world”, he said.

Mr Brown’s comments came during a surprise appearance at TED Global.

“That in my view gives us the first opportunity as a community to fundamentally change the world,” he told the TED Global (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conference.

“Foreign policy can never be the same again.”

Global change

The prime minister talked about the power of technology to unite the world and offer ways to solve some of its most pressing problems.

He said that issues such as climate change could not be solved alone, adding that digital technology offered a way to create a “global society”.

You can’t deal with environmental problems through the existing institutions
Gordon Brown

“Massive changes in technology have allowed the possibility of people linking up around the world,” he said.

In particular, he said, digital communications offered the possibility of finding common ground “with people we will never meet”.

“We have the means to take collective action and take collective action together.”

He talked about recent events in Iran and Burma and how the global community – using blogs and technologies such as Twitter – was able to bring events to widespread attention.

He also highlighted the role of technology in recent elections in Zimbabwe.

“Because people were able to take mobile phone photographs of what was happening at polling stations, it was impossible for [Robert Mugabe] to fix that election in the way that he wanted to do.”

But Mr Brown also stressed the need to create new organisations to tackle environmental, financial, development and security problems.

“We are the first generation to be able to do this,” he told the conference. “We shouldn’t lose the chance.”

He said that older institutions founded after the Second World War, such as the United Nations or the International Monetary Fund, were now “out of date”.

“You can’t deal with environmental problems through the existing institutions,” he told the conference.

2006 Markowitz (US) Open Source Information and US Transitions to and from Hostilities (Defense Science Board Report, December 2004), in Relation to Information-Sharing with non-DoD and Froeign Parties

10 Security, Analysis, Budgets & Funding, Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Historic Contributions, Legislation, Policy, Strategy, Threats
Joe Markowitz
Joe Markowitz

NOTE: By “off the record” Dr. Markowitz has clarified that this information may be shared as we are sharing it, but those benefiting from our sharing should treat the knowledge as if they had acquired it “off the record,” as personal views that should not be attributed nor accepted as anything other than background perceptions.

Joe Markowitx
Joe Markowitx

PLATINUM LIFETIME AWARD, Dr. Joseph Markowitz

Dr. Joseph Markowitz is without question the most qualified Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) pioneer in the ranks of those presently in or retired from U.S. government service.  As the only real chief of the Community Open Source Program Office (COSPO) he tried valiently to nurture a program being systematically undermined by both the leadership and the traditional broadcast monitoring service.  When he moved on to advise the Defense Science Board, he served America well by helping them fully integrate the need for both defense open source information collection and exploitation, and defense information sharing with non-governmental organizations.  His persistent but diplomatic efforts merit our greatest regard.

Policy Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Policy

2006

US

Policy DoD QDR Shift in Focus 18 Years After Gray and Steele Recommended Same

2006

US

Policy Markowitz Defense Science Board Report on Transitions (NGO, OSINT)

2006

US

Policy Peters Counterrevolution in Military Affairs

2006

US

Policy Steele Terms of Reference for Intelligence Reform 1.1

2006

US

Policy Steele In Search of a Leader (Four Essential Reforms)

2006

US

Policy Steele Electoral Refrom as Precursor to Intelligence Reform

2006

US

Policy Tsuruoka Managing for the Future: Interview with Alvin Toffler

2005

US

Policy Andregg Ethics and the IC: Breaking the Laws of God and Man

2005

UK

Policy BASIC Think Tank Report on US Intelligence Incompetence

2005

EU

Policy EU European Union Proposed Multi-National Intelligence Service

2005

US

Policy Godson Culture of Lawfullness

2005

US

Policy Steele ON INTELLIGENCE: Overview in Aftermath of 9-11

2005

US

Policy Steele Op-Ed on Condi Rice’s Active Deception

2005

US

Policy Steele Cease and desist letter on Naquin

2005

US

Policy Tama Princeton Review on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Alexander Army G-2 Accepts OSINT as Separate Discipline

2004

US

Policy Andregg Insanity of Planned Intelligence “Reforms”

2004

AU

Policy Anon & Steele Update on OSINT in Australia

2004

FR

Policy Clerc Cognitive Knowledge for Nations

2004

US

Policy Cordesman Questions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Cordesman & Steele Questions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Simmons Congressman Simmons Letter to General Schoomaker on OSINT

2004

US

Policy Steele DoD OSINT Program: One Man’s View of What Is Needed

2004

US

Policy Steele Transcript of Steele at Secretary of State’s Open Forum 24 March 2004

2004

NL

Policy Tongeren (van) Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Complete)

2004

NL

Policy Tongeren (van) Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Overview)

2003

US

Policy Czech Steady State Revolution and National Security

2003

CA

Policy Fyffe Intelligence Sharing and OSINT

2003

CA

Policy Fyffe Intelligence Sharing and OSINT (Summary)

2003

UN

Policy Lewis Creating the Global Brain

2003

US

Policy Markowitz OSINT in Support of All Source

2003

US

Policy Markowitz Open Source Intelligence Investment Strategy

2003

US

Policy Steele Open Letter to Ambassadors Accredited to the USA

2003

BE

Policy Truyens Intelligent vs. Intelligence: That Is The Question

2002

Italy

Policy Politi 11th of September and the Future of European Intelligence

2001

US

Policy Heibel Intelligence Training: What Is It?  Who Needs It?

2001

US

Policy Heibel Value of Intelligence & Intelligence Training to Any Organization

2001

US

Policy Oakley Use of Civilian & Military Power for Engagement & Intervention

2000

US

Policy Berkowitz An Alternative View of the Future of Intellligence

2000

RU

Policy Budzko Russian View of Electronic Open Sources and How to Exploit Them

2000

US

Policy Ermarth OSINT: A Fresh Look at the Past and the Future

2000

IT

Policy Politi The Birth of OSINT in Italy

1999

US

Policy Allen (ADCI/C) OSINT as a Foundation for All-Source Collection Management

1999

UK

Policy Rolington Changing Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Slides)

1999

UK

Policy Rolington Changing Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Text)

1999

UK

Policy Steele Snakes in the Grass: Open Source Doctrine

1998

US

Policy Donahue Balancing Spending Among Spies, Satellites, and Schoolboys

1997

FR

Policy Botbol The OSINT Revolution: Early Failures and Future Prospects

1997

US

Policy Felsher Viability & Survivability of US Remote Sensing as Function of Policy

1997

US

Policy Steele Intelligence in the Balance: Opening Remarks at OSS ‘97

1997

US

Policy Sutton Global Coverage ($1.5B/Year Needed for Lower Tier OSINT)

1997

US

Policy Tsuruoka Asian Perceptions of What Is and Is Not Legal in Economic Intelligence

1997

UK

Policy Tyrrell Proposals to Develop a NATO/PfP OSINT Capability

1996

FR

Policy Clerc Economic and Financial Intelligence: The French Model

1996

US

Policy Kahin What Is Intellectual Property?

1996

US

Policy Steele Creating a Smart Nation (Govt Info Q and also CYBERWAR Chapter)

1996

US

Policy Steele InfoPeace: OSINT as a Policy Option & Operational Alternative

1996

US

Policy Steele Open Sources and the Virtual Intelligence Community

1996

US

Policy Steele Protecting the Civilian Infrastructure as an Aspect of Information Warfare

1996

US

Policy Zuckerman The Central Role of Open Source Economic Intelligence

1995

US

Policy Prusak Seven Myths of the Information Age

1995

US

Policy Steele Conference Executive Summary C/HPSCI and former DCI Colby

1995

US

Policy Steele Creating a Smart Nation: Strategy, Policy, Intelligence, & Information

1995

US

Policy Steele SMART NATIONS: NI Strategies and Virtual Intelligence Communities

1994

US

Policy Ogdin & Giser Cyber-Glut, and What To Do About It

1994

FR

Policy Schmidt Open Source Solutions 1994: The State of Intelligence

1994

US

Policy Schwartau Letter on NII Security

1994

US

Policy Schwartau et al Cross-Walk of 3 Experts’ Spending $1 Billion per Year for NII Security

1994

US

Policy Steele Communications, Content, Coordination, and C4 Security: Talking Points

1994

US

Policy Steele Correspondence to Mr. Marty Harris, NII Commission

1994

US

Policy Steele DATA MINING: Don’t Buy or Build Your Shovel Until You Know What…

1994

US

Policy Steele Expansion of Questions Posed by Senator John Warner to Aspin-Brown

1994

US

Policy Steele Letter to the Open Source Lunch Club on PFIAB Being Useless

1994

US

Policy Steele National and Corporate Security in the Age of Information

1994

US

Policy Steele Private Enterprise Intelligence: Its Potential Contribution to Nat’l Sec.

1993

FR

Policy Beaumard France: Think-tank to Anticipate & Regulate Economic Intelligence Issues

1993

FR

Policy Beaumard Learned Nations: Competitive Advantages Via Knowledge Strategies

1993

US

Policy Brenner Law and Policy of Telecommunications and Computer Database Networks

1993

US

Policy Castagna Review of Reich, The Work of Nations

1993

AU

Policy Chantler Need for Australia to Develop a Strategic Policy on OSI

1993

US

Policy Cisler Community Computer Networks

1993

US

Policy Civille The Spirit of Access: Equity, NREN, and the NII

1993

US

Policy Fedanzo A Genetic View of National Intelligence

1993

US

Policy Haver Intelligence Aim Veers to Amassing Overt Information

1993

JP

Policy Kumon Japan and the United States in the Information Age

1993

SE

Policy Leijonhelm Economic Intelligence Cooperation Between Government Industry

1993

US

Policy Love Comments on the Clinton Administration’s ‘Vision’ Statement for the NII

1993

US

Policy Petersen A New Twenty-First Century Role for the Intelligence Community

1993

GE

Policy Schmidt History of Failure, Future of Opportunity: Reinventions and Deja Vu

1993

US

Policy Steele A Critical Evaluation of U.S. National Security Capabilities

1993

US

Policy Steele ACCESS: Theory and Practice of Intelligence in the Age of Information

1993

US

Policy Steele Executive Order 12356, ‘National Security Information’

1993

US

Policy Steele Reinventing Intelligence in the Age of Information (TP for DCI)

1993

US

Policy Steele Reinventing Intelligence: The Advantages of OSINT

1993

US

Policy Steele Role of Grey Lit & Non-Traditional Agencies in Informing Policy Makers

1993

US

Policy Toffler (Both) Knowledge Strategies, Intellience Restructuring,  Global Competitiveness

1993

US

Policy Wallner Overview of IC Open Source Requirements and Capabilities

1993

US

Policy Wood The IC and the Open Source Information Challenge

1992

US

Policy Barlow EFF and the National Public Network (NPN)

1992

US

Policy Castagna Review of Toffler’s PowerShift

1992

SE

Policy Dedijer Open Source Solutions: Intelligence and Secrecy

1992

US

Policy Gage Open Sources, Open Systems

1992

US

Policy Greenwald Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization: Diplomacy’s Cutting Edge

1992

US

Policy Hughes An Affordable Approach to Networking America’s Schools

1992

US

Policy Kahin New Legal Paradigms for Multi-Media Information in Cyberspace

1992

US

Policy Kahn Outline of a Global Knowledge Architecture, Visions and Possibilities

1992

US

Policy Steele E3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1992

US

Policy Steele Inaugural Remarks Opening 1st International Conference

1992

US

Policy Steele Information Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

Policy Steele OSINT Clarifies Global Threats: Offers Partial Remedy to Budget Cuts

1992

US

Policy Steele Review Strassmann, Information PayOff

1992

US

Policy Wood Remarks, Don’t Be Suspicious of Contractors

1991

US

Policy JFK Working Group National Intelligence and the American Enterprise: Possibilities

1991

US

Policy Karraker Highways of the Mind

1991

US

Policy Steele How to Avoid Strategic Intelligence Failures in the Future

1990

US

Policy Steele Recasting National Security in a Changing World

1957

US

Policy Wright Project for a World Intelligence Center

2006 Briefing to the Coalition Coordination Center (CCC) Leadership at the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM)–Multinational Intelligence: Can CENTCOM Lead the Way? Reflections on OSINT & the Coalition

About the Idea, Analysis, Briefings (Core), Briefings & Lectures, Budgets & Funding, Legislation, Methods & Process, Policy
CCC CENTCOM
CCC CENTCOM

LINK FIXED 2009-10-13 Sorry ’bout that….

Note:  Post-Brief version to ASD/SOLIC

2005 Steele to Hayden Asking for Naquin Cease & Desist

History of Opposition, Legislation, Military, Policy

Doug Naquin, the senior Central Intelligence (CIA) officer responsible for Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) and for the Open Source Center (OSC), the half-baked replacement for the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), is a good person trapped in a bad system.  He not only does not know what he does not know, but is held in multiple strait-jackets by CIA security, CIA legal, and CIA culture.

In November 2005 we recognized the severe damage that Doug Naquin–with the best of intentions–was doing to the US military, and we tried to stop him.  Below is the letter that was sent to the Deputy Director of National Intelligence, General Michael Hayden, USAF.   He ignored the letter.

Naquin is still doing damage.  Apart from misrepresentations to the Combatant Commanders (COCOMs), the personnel exchange is sending unqualified FBIS/OSC people out to the military where they not only have no clue, but they also try to spin everything to CIA’s advantage.  The Department of Defense (DoD) needs to realize that the OSC is not a “full-spectrum” OSINT shop; that it can barely handle CIA’s own internal requirements (and by some accounts, is considered argely worthless among the CIA analysts as well)

This letter was on target.  It is still on target.  It is time for Doug Naquin to do what he does best: stay on campus at CIA and stop messing up the US military with misprepresentations, failures to perform, and exported personnel that are not worth the C Rations it takes to feed them.

Steele to Hayden 25 Nov 05
Steele to Hayden 25 Nov 05