Graphic: Arno Reuser on Cyber-Hygiene

Advanced Cyber/IO, IO Impotency, IO Privacy

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Arno Reuser: Google Search Reference Sheet

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Arno Reuser
Arno Reuser

search language Google.com quick reference sheet

Editted: 15oct2014

Google Search Term Guide

Posted with permission.

http://www.opensourceintelligence.eu    http://www.reuser.biz    http://rr.reuser.biz

Robert Steele: How Dutch Intelligence Survived & Prospered Using Open Source Human Intelligence as a Foundation for Ethical Evidence-Based Decisions

Advanced Cyber/IO, Ethics, Government
Robert David STEELE VivasClick on Image for Bio Page
Robert David STEELE Vivas
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REACTION TO:  2012 Robert Steele: The Human Factor & The Human Environment: Concepts & Doctrine? Implications for Human & Open Source Intelligence 2.0

These are my words, reflecting what I learned in multiple funded trips to work with Dutch intelligence at various levels, and multiple conversation across various conferences I attended in Europe.  This is more or less what I told George Tenet when he became DCI….to no effect, naturally.

1994 was a very stressful time in Dutch intelligence history.  A scandal had erupted in which the Parliament was investigating Dutch intelligence intrusions with audio-video into the homes of specific Dutch citizens suspected of this and that.  Parliament was so angry they threatened to cut all funding for all intelligence.  Two very good things emerged from this:

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Future of the Library versus Future of the Librarian

Advanced Cyber/IO, Communities of Practice, Cultural Intelligence, info-graphics/data-visualization, IO Mapping, IO Multinational, IO Sense-Making, Methods & Process, Policies, Threats
Seth Godin Home

The future of the library

What is a public library for?

First, how we got here:

Before Gutenberg, a book cost about as much as a small house. As a result, only kings and bishops could afford to own a book of their own.

This naturally led to the creation of shared books, of libraries where scholars (everyone else was too busy not starving) could come to read books that they didn’t have to own. The library as warehouse for books worth sharing.

Only after that did we invent the librarian.

The librarian isn’t a clerk who happens to work at a library. A librarian is a data hound, a guide, a sherpa and a teacher. The librarian is the interface between reams of data and the untrained but motivated user.

After Gutenberg, books  got a lot cheaper. More individuals built their own collections. At the same time, though, the number of titles exploded, and the demand for libraries did as well. We definitely needed a warehouse to store all this bounty, and more than ever we needed a librarian to help us find what we needed. The library is a house for the librarian.

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