Review (Guest): Votescam – The Stealing of America

5 Star, America (Founders, Current Situation), Congress (Failure, Reform), Crime (Corporate), Crime (Government), Executive (Partisan Failure, Reform), Impeachment & Treason, Justice (Failure, Reform), Politics, Power (Pathologies & Utilization)
Amazon Page

James M. Collier, Kenneth F. Collier

5.0 out of 5 stars Hard evidence of Florida vote fraud – and a great read!, December 19, 2000
By  Jon Fairhurst (Washington State, USA) – See all my reviews

This is a “must read” for anyone who smelled a rat in the 2000 presidential election. Written eight years before the fact, the authors accurately predict Janet Reno’s inaction and Justice Scalia’s brazen decision, which effectively shut down the couting process. Not just theory, the Collier brothers personally discovered and present hard evidence of decades of Florida vote fraud.

The clues point to a systematic corruption of our voting system by the heads of the major mass media corporations. It’s no surprise that Bush’s cousin at the Fox news decision desk triggered the stampede of “BUSH WINS” graphics. And its no surprise that searching every mass media website will yield no hits on the word “votescam”.

This book does not lean towards either major political party. It simply champions democracy, freedom of information and the need to enforce our voting laws. Buy it. Read it. Take action to revive our right to vote.

Don’t let the claimed 4-6 week wait dissuade you. I got my copy after a wait of only four days on December 10th, 2000.)

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See Also:

The Best Democracy Money Can Buy

Web:  www.votescam.org

Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]

Analysis, Budgets & Funding, Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Ethics, InfoOps (IO), Key Players, Methods & Process, Mobile, Policies, Policy, Real Time, Reform, Searches, Strategy, Technologies, Threats, Tools
COIN20 Trip Report
Paradise Found

The future of OSINT is M4IS2.

The future of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) is Multinational, Multifunctional, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing & Sense-Making (M4IS2).

The following, subject to the approval of Executive and Congressional leadership, are suggested hueristics (rules of thumb):

Rule 1: All Open Source Information (OSIF) goes directly to the high side (multinational top secret) the instant it is received at any level by any civilian or military element responsive to global OSINT grid.  This includes all of the contextual agency and mission specific information from the civilian elements previously stove-piped or disgarded, not only within the US, but ultimately within all 90+ participating nations.

Rule 2: In return for Rule 1, the US IC agrees that the Department of State (and within DoD, Civil Affairs) is the proponent outside the wire, and the sharing of all OSIF originating outside the US IC is at the discretion of State/Civil Affairs without secret world caveat or constraint.  OSIF collected by US IC elements is NOT included in this warrant.

Continue reading “Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]”

Review: The Bottom Billion–Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It

5 Star, Capitalism (Good & Bad), Humanitarian Assistance, Intelligence (Wealth of Networks), Peace, Poverty, & Middle Class, Stabilization & Reconstruction

Bottom BillionElegantly brilliant, incisive clarity, quite extraordinary, February 22, 2008

Paul Collier

I read a lot, almost entirely in non-fiction, and this book is easily one of the “top ten” on the future and one of the top three on extreme poverty, in my own limited reading.

The other three books that have inspired me in this specific area are:
The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid
Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism
The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time

There is an enormous amount of actionable wisdom in this book, which is deceptively easy to read and digest. The author’s bottom line is clear early on:

A. The fifty failing states at the bottom, most in Africa, others in Central Asia, are a cesspool of misery that is terribly dangerous to all others, exporting disease, crime, and conflict.

B. The responsibility for peace to enable prosperity cannot be expected from within–it must be provided as a common good from outside. In support of this point, toward the end of the book, the author posits a 15:1 return on investment from $250M a year in investment and aid, mostly technical assistance.

This book is a superb guide for regional authorities and international coalitions with respect to the value of non-military interventions.
The author provides compelling yet concise overviews of the four traps that affect the billion at the bottom:

A. The Conflict Trap
B. The Natural Resource Export Trap
C. Landlocked in a Bad Neighbors Trap
D. Poor and Corrupt Governance

The author describes the need for a “whole of government” approach, both among those seeking to deliver assistance, and those receiving it.
I have a note, a new insight at least to me, that AIDs proliferated so quickly across Africa because of the combination of mass rape followed by mass migration. There are many other gifted turns of phrase throughout.
A study on the cost of a Kalashnikov is most helpful. The author tells us that the legacy of any war is the proliferation of inexpensive small arms into the open market.

Across the book the author points out that the gravest threat to governance and stability within any fragile economy is a standing army.
Each of the traps is discussed in depth.

The middle of the book outlines nine-strategies for the land-locked who suffer from being limited to their neighbors as a marketplace, rather than the world as a whole.

1. Work with neighbors to create cross-border transport infrastructure
2. Work to improve neighbors’ economies for mutual benefit
3. Work to improve access to coastal areas (the author points out that the sea is so essential, that landlocked countries should not* be* countries, they should be part of a larger country that borders the sea)
4. Become a haven of peace, providing financial and other services.
5. Don’t be air-locked or electronically-locked (the first study of the Marine Corps that I led in 1988-1989 found that half of the countries of concern did not have suitable ports but all had ample C-130 capable airfields).
6. Encourage remittances
7. Create transparent investment-friendly environment for resource prospecting
8. Focus on rural development
9. Attract aid

Toward the end of the book I am struck by the author’s pointed (and documented) exclusion of democracy and civil rights as necessary conditions for reform. Instead, large populations, secondary education, and a recent civil war (opening paths to change), are key.
$64 billion is the cost to the region of a civil war, with $7 billion being the minimal expected return on investment for preventing a civil war in the country itself.

Bad policies come with a sixty year hang-over.

Asia is the solid middle and makes trade a marginal and unlikely option for rescuing Africa UNLESS there are a combination of trade barriers against imports from Asia, and unreciprocal trade preferences from richer countries. In the context of globalization, only capital and people offer hope.

In the author’s view, capital is not going to the bottom billion because:

A. Bottom of the barrel risk
B. Too small to learn about
C. Genuinely fragile

In terms of human resources, after discussing capital flight, the author concludes that the educated leave as quickly as they can. I am inspired by this discussion to conclude that we need a Manhattan project for Africa, in which a Prosperity Corps of Gray Eagles is incentivized to adopt one of the 50 failed states, and provided with a semblance of normal living and working conditions along with bonuses for staying in-country for ten years or more. As I reflect on how the USA has spent $30 billion for “diplomacy” in 2007, and over $975 billion for waging war, (such that the Comptroller General just resigned from a fifteen year appointment after telling Congress the USA is “insolvent”) this begs public outrage and engagement.

As the book makes its way to the conclusion the author’s prose grabs me:

“We should be helping the heroes” attempting reform

We are guilty in the West of “inertia, ignorance, and incompetence.”

The “cesspool of misery….is both terrible….and dangerous.”

Several other noteworthy highlights (no substitute for buying and reading the book in its entirety:

Aid does offer a 1% growth kick

Aid bureaucracy, despite horror stories, adds real value in contrast to funds that vanish into the corrupt local government

Misdirection of unrestricted funds leads to militarization and instability.

The author touches briefly on the enormous value that industry can offer when it is finally incentivized to do so. DeBeers and its certification process are cited with respect, perhaps saving diamonds from going the way of fur.

The author stresses that top-down transparency enables bottom-up public scrutiny and the two together help drive out corruption (something Lawrence Lessig has committed the remainder of his life to).

There is an excellent section on irresponsible NGOs, notably Christian Aid, feared by the government and not understood by the public.
I put the book down with a very strong feeling of hope.

Other books I recommend, in addition to the three above:
A More Secure World: Our Shared Responsibility–Report of the Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change
Deliver Us from Evil: Peacekeepers, Warlords and a World of Endless Conflict
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People
The leadership of civilization building: Administrative and civilization theory, symbolic dialogue, and citizen skills for the 21st century
Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization, Third Edition

Reader Training Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Methods & Process
Original
Original

1997

US

Reader Admin Cover, Appreciation, Foreword, Contents

1997

US

Reader Basch Secrets of the SuperSearchers: A Personal and Practical Perspective

1997

FR

Reader Baumard Learned Nations: Competitive Advantages Through Knowledge Strategies

1997

FR

Reader Bonthous Culture: The Missing Intelligence Variable

1997

UK

Reader Collier Toward the Global Information Industry and a New Information Paradigm

1997

US

Reader Donahue National Funding Directions for Open Source Intelligence

1997

US

Reader Fedanzo A Genetic View of National Intelligence

1997

US

Reader Fedanzo Implementing OSINT Through a Distributed Contribution Model

1997

US

Reader Herring The Role of Intelligence in Formulating Strategy

1997

US

Reader Hlava Selected Professional or Trade Associations in Information

1997

US

Reader Karraker (WIRED) Highways of the Mind

1997

US

Reader Kees Advanced Information Processing & Analysis

1997

SE

Reader Leijonhelm Economic Intelligence Cooperation Between Government and Industry

1997

US

Reader Markowitz Community Open Source Strategic Plan (COSPO)

1997

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Reader McGill Private Sector Role in Collecting, Processing, & Disseminating Intelligence

1997

US

Reader MITRE Open Source Research Processing Initiative

1997

US

Reader Peters After the Revolution

1997

US

Reader Rheingold Tools for Thinking–Thinking New Thoughts

1997

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Reader Schmidt A History of Failure, A Future of Opportunity: Reinventions and Deja Vu

1997

US

Reader Shepard Intelligence Analysis in the Year 2002: A Concept of Operations

1997

US

Reader Sibbit Commercial Remote Sensing: Open Source Imagery Intelligence

1997

US

Reader Steele ACCESS: Theory and Practice of Intelligence in the Age of Information

1997

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Reader Steele Commercial Imagery (OSS Notices Extract)

1997

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Reader Steele Draft Legislation: The National Information Strategy Act of 1994

1997

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Reader Steele E3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1997

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Reader Steele HAC Surveys Open Source Intelligence (OSS Notices Extract)

1997

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Reader Steele Information Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1997

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Reader Steele Intelligence Building Blocks (OSS Notices Extract)

1997

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Reader Steele Lip Service, Great Pretenders, & OSINT (OSS Notices Extract)

1997

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Reader Steele Mapping, Charting, & Geodesy Deficiencies (OSS Notices Extract)

1997

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Reader Steele National Intelligence: The Community Tomorrow? (SASA at NSA)

1997

US

Reader Steele Open Source Intelligence: What Is It? Why Is It Important to the Military?

1997

US

Reader Steele OSINT: Graphical Overviews

1997

US

Reader Steele Private Enterprise Intelligence: Its Potential Contribution to Nat’l Security

1997

US

Reader Steele Reinventing Intelligence: The Advantages of Open Source Intelligence

1997

US

Reader Steele Talking Points for the Public Interest Summit

1997

US

Reader Steele Testimony to Commission on Eliminating Excessive Secrecy in Govt

1997

US

Reader Steele Toward High-Performance Organizations: A Strategic Role for Groupware

1997

US

Reader Studeman Teaching the Giant to Dance: Contradictions & Opportunities within the IC

1997

US

Reader Toffler Global Security & Global Competitiveness (OSS ’03 Keynote)

1995

US

Reader Markowitz COSPO: Community Open Source Program Office Strategic Plan

1995

US

Reader Peters After the Revolution

1995

US

Reader Steele House Appropriations Committee Surveys Open Source Intelligence

1995

US

Reader Steele Intelligence Building Blocks

1995

US

Reader Steele Lip Service, Great Pretenders, and Open Source Intelligence

1995

US

Reader Steele Mapping, Charting, & Geodesy Deficiencies

1995

US

Reader Steele National Intelligence: The Community Tomorrow? (At NSA, 1995)

1995

US

Reader Steele OSINT: What Is It?  Why Is It Important to the Military?

1994

US

Reader Basch Secrets of the Super-Searchers

1994

UK

Reader Collier Toward a Global Information Industry and New Information Paradigm

1994

US

Reader Englebart Toward High Performance Organizations

1994

US

Reader Steele Draft Legislation: National Security Act of 1994

1994

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Reader Steele Private Enterprise Intelligence: Its Potential Contribution to Nat’l Sec

1994

US

Reader Steele Talking Point for the Public Interest Summit

1993

US

Reader McGill Private Sector Role in Collecting, Processing, Disseming Intelligence

1993

FR

Reader Schmidt A History of Failure, A Future of Opportunity: Reinvention & Deja Vu

1993

US

Reader Steele Reinventing Intelligence: The Advantages of OSINT

Commerce Archive on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Commerce
Archive 1992-2006
Archive 1992-2006

2004

SE

Commerce Bjore Commercial Intelligence

2003

SE

Commerce Bjore Reinventing Commercial Intelligence

2002

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Commerce Klavans Identifying Commercial Opportunities from Emerging Science

2000

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Commerce Technology Intelligence from Patents

2000

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Commerce Sullivan Business Perspective on Essential Overseas Information

1999

FR

Commerce Baumlin Espionage or Business Intelligence: Nuances of Gray

1999

UK

Commerce Collier Overview of New Horizons in OSINT Sources, Softwares, Services

1999

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Commerce Miller The Year the Information Industry Hit Bottom

1999

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Commerce Robinson How Mobil Uses Open Sources & Services

1998

FR

Commerce Baumlin Black, White, Gray, Realities of the Investigative Marketplace

1998

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Commerce Boyer Assessing US and Other Space Imaging Options for European Needs

1998

GE

Commerce Bruckner Information and Knowledge Management in Intelligence Situations

1998

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Commerce Burwell Commercial Online Source Validation Methods

1998

UK

Commerce Collier The Pricing of Electronic Information

1998

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Commerce Dunn Confronting the Future of the Information Industry

1998

Israel

Commerce Feiler Open and Personal: Economic Intelligence in the Middle East

1998

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Commerce Horowitz Economic Espionage and OSINT: Legal and Security Implications

1998

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Commerce Stara Valuing Competitive Intelligence

1998

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Commerce Yankeelov Pushing the Assets of Time and Knowledge

1997

BE

Commerce Borry & Sohl Electronic Sources & Methods: A Belgian Business Perspective

1997

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Commerce Suggs International Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Slides)

1997

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Commerce Suggs International Trade & Commerce Intelligence Search Strategies (Text)

1996

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Commerce Bates Recent and Emerging Trends in Information Brokering

1996

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Commerce Call Realities & Myths Regarding Financial Research Using Open Sources

1996

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Commerce Kolb (SCIP) Sales Pitch for the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals

1996

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Commerce Sibbit Emerging Business Models for Commercial Remote Sensing

1996

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Commerce Steele Concise Directory of Selected International Open Sources & Services

1996

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Commerce Steele Open Source Intelligence Handbook, Chapter 1, Overview

1995

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Commerce Herring Business Intelligence in Japan and Sweden: Lessons for the US

1995

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Commerce Herring Intelligence to Enhance American Companies’ Competitiveness

1995

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Commerce Herring Using the Intelligence Process to Create Competitive Global Advantage

1995

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Commerce Simon & Blixt Emerging Issues in Competitive Intelligence

1994

US

Commerce Basch Secrets of the Super-Searchers: A Personal and Practical Perspective

1994

Switz

Commerce Bernhardt Tailoring Competitive Intelligence to Executive Needs

1994

UK

Commerce Collier Global Information Industry and a New Information Paradigm

1994

US

Commerce Himelfarb Introduction to Competitive and Business Intelligence

1994

US

Commerce Kelly ASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (S)

1994

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Commerce Kelly ASIDIC Perspectives & Its Contributions to National Competitiveness (T)

1994

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Commerce Marcinko Association of Information and Dissemination Centers, Case Studies

1994

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Commerce Shaker Beating the Competition: From Boardroom to War Room

1994

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Commerce Shaker & Rice From War Room to Board Room

1994

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Commerce Sharp How to Identify Changes that Threaten Your Business Activity, In Advance

1994

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Commerce Stanat The Power of Global Business Information

1994

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Commerce Steele Germany: ACCESS:  Theory and Practice of Competitor Intelligence

1994?

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Commerce Steele ASIDIC: Intelligence Community as a New Market

1993

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Commerce Caldwell International Investigative Market (Slides)

1993

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Commerce Caldwell International Investigative Market (Text)

1993

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Commerce Dedijer Europe’s To BI or not to BE: Inventory of a New Business Innovation

1993

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Commerce Elias An Overview of the Information Industry in 1993

1993

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Commerce Fraumann Business is War

1993

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Commerce Herring Business Intelligence: Some Have It, Some Don’t–How They Do It

1993

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Commerce Himelfarb Intelligence Requirements for Executives

1993

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Commerce Monaco & Gerliczy Economic Intelligence and Open Source Information

1993

JP

Commerce Shima Overview of Japanese Media and Information Systems

1993

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Commerce Splitt The U.S. Information Industry: Changing the 21st Century

1993

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Commerce Steele Corporate Role in National Competitiveness

1993

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Commerce Steele The Intelligence Community as a New Market

1992

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Commerce Hlava Information Industry Corporations (Partial Listing)

1992

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Commerce Hlava Selected Professional and Trade Associations in Information

1992

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Commerce Hlava The Information Industry: Impact of Globalization

1992

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Commerce Meyer Business Intelligence at the Cutting Edge

1992

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Commerce Nobel From A to Z: What We’ve Done with Open Sources

1992

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Commerce Shaker & Kardulias Intelligence Support to U.S. Business

1992

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Commerce Williams OSINT to Create Intelligence in a Commercial Environment

Review: Strategies in the Electronic Information Industry: A Guide for the 1990’s (Infonortics in-depth briefings)

5 Star, Best Practices in Management, Information Operations, Information Technology

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Basic Reference on Next Generation IT–Order Out of Print!,

May 29, 2000
Harry R. Collier
Harry is the founder and sponsor of the very interesting Association for Global Strategic Information. His book is as good a review as one could ask for, of “whither electronic publishing.” He defines the pieces as consisting of data originators, information providers, online vendors, information integrators, delivery channels, and customers. Overall Harry is quite firm on pointing out that the Internet is not revolutionary and will not transform most medium and small businesses in the near future. He goes over the Internet in relation to established publishers, covers pricing and copyright issues in relation to the Internet, and ends with a discussion of next generation applications and technologies and forecasts.
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