Review: 935 Lies – The Future of Truth and the Decline of America’s Moral Integrity

5 Star, America (Founders, Current Situation), Censorship & Denial of Access, Communications, Crime (Corporate), Crime (Government), Culture, Research, Democracy, Future, Impeachment & Treason, Information Society, Intelligence (Public), Misinformation & Propaganda, Politics, Power (Pathologies & Utilization), Secrecy & Politics of Secrecy
Amazon Page
Amazon Page

Charles Lewis

5.0 out of 5 stars Title Short-Changes Value — This is One of the Most Important Books of Our Time, July 12, 2014

I’m not thrilled with the title because it implies to the browser that the book is about the 935 now-documented lies that led to the war in Iraq, and that is not the case — those lies are simply one of many evidentiary cases spanned a much broader spectrum. As the author himself outlines early on, the book is about a retrospective review of the struggle for truth from the lies that led to Viet-Nam to date (less 9/11); a concurrent review of the corruption and diminuition of commercial journalism; and finally, the future of the truth.

Continue reading “Review: 935 Lies – The Future of Truth and the Decline of America’s Moral Integrity”

Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]

Analysis, Budgets & Funding, Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Ethics, InfoOps (IO), Key Players, Methods & Process, Mobile, Policies, Policy, Real Time, Reform, Searches, Strategy, Technologies, Threats, Tools
COIN20 Trip Report
Paradise Found

The future of OSINT is M4IS2.

The future of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) is Multinational, Multifunctional, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing & Sense-Making (M4IS2).

The following, subject to the approval of Executive and Congressional leadership, are suggested hueristics (rules of thumb):

Rule 1: All Open Source Information (OSIF) goes directly to the high side (multinational top secret) the instant it is received at any level by any civilian or military element responsive to global OSINT grid.  This includes all of the contextual agency and mission specific information from the civilian elements previously stove-piped or disgarded, not only within the US, but ultimately within all 90+ participating nations.

Rule 2: In return for Rule 1, the US IC agrees that the Department of State (and within DoD, Civil Affairs) is the proponent outside the wire, and the sharing of all OSIF originating outside the US IC is at the discretion of State/Civil Affairs without secret world caveat or constraint.  OSIF collected by US IC elements is NOT included in this warrant.

Continue reading “Search: The Future of OSINT [is M4IS2-Multinational]”

Policy Archives on Public Intelligence (1992-2006)

Policy

2006

US

Policy DoD QDR Shift in Focus 18 Years After Gray and Steele Recommended Same

2006

US

Policy Markowitz Defense Science Board Report on Transitions (NGO, OSINT)

2006

US

Policy Peters Counterrevolution in Military Affairs

2006

US

Policy Steele Terms of Reference for Intelligence Reform 1.1

2006

US

Policy Steele In Search of a Leader (Four Essential Reforms)

2006

US

Policy Steele Electoral Refrom as Precursor to Intelligence Reform

2006

US

Policy Tsuruoka Managing for the Future: Interview with Alvin Toffler

2005

US

Policy Andregg Ethics and the IC: Breaking the Laws of God and Man

2005

UK

Policy BASIC Think Tank Report on US Intelligence Incompetence

2005

EU

Policy EU European Union Proposed Multi-National Intelligence Service

2005

US

Policy Godson Culture of Lawfullness

2005

US

Policy Steele ON INTELLIGENCE: Overview in Aftermath of 9-11

2005

US

Policy Steele Op-Ed on Condi Rice’s Active Deception

2005

US

Policy Steele Cease and desist letter on Naquin

2005

US

Policy Tama Princeton Review on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Alexander Army G-2 Accepts OSINT as Separate Discipline

2004

US

Policy Andregg Insanity of Planned Intelligence “Reforms”

2004

AU

Policy Anon & Steele Update on OSINT in Australia

2004

FR

Policy Clerc Cognitive Knowledge for Nations

2004

US

Policy Cordesman Questions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Cordesman & Steele Questions & Answers on Intelligence Reform

2004

US

Policy Simmons Congressman Simmons Letter to General Schoomaker on OSINT

2004

US

Policy Steele DoD OSINT Program: One Man’s View of What Is Needed

2004

US

Policy Steele Transcript of Steele at Secretary of State’s Open Forum 24 March 2004

2004

NL

Policy Tongeren (van) Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Complete)

2004

NL

Policy Tongeren (van) Need for Global Alliance for Human Security (Overview)

2003

US

Policy Czech Steady State Revolution and National Security

2003

CA

Policy Fyffe Intelligence Sharing and OSINT

2003

CA

Policy Fyffe Intelligence Sharing and OSINT (Summary)

2003

UN

Policy Lewis Creating the Global Brain

2003

US

Policy Markowitz OSINT in Support of All Source

2003

US

Policy Markowitz Open Source Intelligence Investment Strategy

2003

US

Policy Steele Open Letter to Ambassadors Accredited to the USA

2003

BE

Policy Truyens Intelligent vs. Intelligence: That Is The Question

2002

Italy

Policy Politi 11th of September and the Future of European Intelligence

2001

US

Policy Heibel Intelligence Training: What Is It?  Who Needs It?

2001

US

Policy Heibel Value of Intelligence & Intelligence Training to Any Organization

2001

US

Policy Oakley Use of Civilian & Military Power for Engagement & Intervention

2000

US

Policy Berkowitz An Alternative View of the Future of Intellligence

2000

RU

Policy Budzko Russian View of Electronic Open Sources and How to Exploit Them

2000

US

Policy Ermarth OSINT: A Fresh Look at the Past and the Future

2000

IT

Policy Politi The Birth of OSINT in Italy

1999

US

Policy Allen (ADCI/C) OSINT as a Foundation for All-Source Collection Management

1999

UK

Policy Rolington Changing Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Slides)

1999

UK

Policy Rolington Changing Messages in Western Knowledge Over 400 Years (Text)

1999

UK

Policy Steele Snakes in the Grass: Open Source Doctrine

1998

US

Policy Donahue Balancing Spending Among Spies, Satellites, and Schoolboys

1997

FR

Policy Botbol The OSINT Revolution: Early Failures and Future Prospects

1997

US

Policy Felsher Viability & Survivability of US Remote Sensing as Function of Policy

1997

US

Policy Steele Intelligence in the Balance: Opening Remarks at OSS ‘97

1997

US

Policy Sutton Global Coverage ($1.5B/Year Needed for Lower Tier OSINT)

1997

US

Policy Tsuruoka Asian Perceptions of What Is and Is Not Legal in Economic Intelligence

1997

UK

Policy Tyrrell Proposals to Develop a NATO/PfP OSINT Capability

1996

FR

Policy Clerc Economic and Financial Intelligence: The French Model

1996

US

Policy Kahin What Is Intellectual Property?

1996

US

Policy Steele Creating a Smart Nation (Govt Info Q and also CYBERWAR Chapter)

1996

US

Policy Steele InfoPeace: OSINT as a Policy Option & Operational Alternative

1996

US

Policy Steele Open Sources and the Virtual Intelligence Community

1996

US

Policy Steele Protecting the Civilian Infrastructure as an Aspect of Information Warfare

1996

US

Policy Zuckerman The Central Role of Open Source Economic Intelligence

1995

US

Policy Prusak Seven Myths of the Information Age

1995

US

Policy Steele Conference Executive Summary C/HPSCI and former DCI Colby

1995

US

Policy Steele Creating a Smart Nation: Strategy, Policy, Intelligence, & Information

1995

US

Policy Steele SMART NATIONS: NI Strategies and Virtual Intelligence Communities

1994

US

Policy Ogdin & Giser Cyber-Glut, and What To Do About It

1994

FR

Policy Schmidt Open Source Solutions 1994: The State of Intelligence

1994

US

Policy Schwartau Letter on NII Security

1994

US

Policy Schwartau et al Cross-Walk of 3 Experts’ Spending $1 Billion per Year for NII Security

1994

US

Policy Steele Communications, Content, Coordination, and C4 Security: Talking Points

1994

US

Policy Steele Correspondence to Mr. Marty Harris, NII Commission

1994

US

Policy Steele DATA MINING: Don’t Buy or Build Your Shovel Until You Know What…

1994

US

Policy Steele Expansion of Questions Posed by Senator John Warner to Aspin-Brown

1994

US

Policy Steele Letter to the Open Source Lunch Club on PFIAB Being Useless

1994

US

Policy Steele National and Corporate Security in the Age of Information

1994

US

Policy Steele Private Enterprise Intelligence: Its Potential Contribution to Nat’l Sec.

1993

FR

Policy Beaumard France: Think-tank to Anticipate & Regulate Economic Intelligence Issues

1993

FR

Policy Beaumard Learned Nations: Competitive Advantages Via Knowledge Strategies

1993

US

Policy Brenner Law and Policy of Telecommunications and Computer Database Networks

1993

US

Policy Castagna Review of Reich, The Work of Nations

1993

AU

Policy Chantler Need for Australia to Develop a Strategic Policy on OSI

1993

US

Policy Cisler Community Computer Networks

1993

US

Policy Civille The Spirit of Access: Equity, NREN, and the NII

1993

US

Policy Fedanzo A Genetic View of National Intelligence

1993

US

Policy Haver Intelligence Aim Veers to Amassing Overt Information

1993

JP

Policy Kumon Japan and the United States in the Information Age

1993

SE

Policy Leijonhelm Economic Intelligence Cooperation Between Government Industry

1993

US

Policy Love Comments on the Clinton Administration’s ‘Vision’ Statement for the NII

1993

US

Policy Petersen A New Twenty-First Century Role for the Intelligence Community

1993

GE

Policy Schmidt History of Failure, Future of Opportunity: Reinventions and Deja Vu

1993

US

Policy Steele A Critical Evaluation of U.S. National Security Capabilities

1993

US

Policy Steele ACCESS: Theory and Practice of Intelligence in the Age of Information

1993

US

Policy Steele Executive Order 12356, ‘National Security Information’

1993

US

Policy Steele Reinventing Intelligence in the Age of Information (TP for DCI)

1993

US

Policy Steele Reinventing Intelligence: The Advantages of OSINT

1993

US

Policy Steele Role of Grey Lit & Non-Traditional Agencies in Informing Policy Makers

1993

US

Policy Toffler (Both) Knowledge Strategies, Intellience Restructuring,  Global Competitiveness

1993

US

Policy Wallner Overview of IC Open Source Requirements and Capabilities

1993

US

Policy Wood The IC and the Open Source Information Challenge

1992

US

Policy Barlow EFF and the National Public Network (NPN)

1992

US

Policy Castagna Review of Toffler’s PowerShift

1992

SE

Policy Dedijer Open Source Solutions: Intelligence and Secrecy

1992

US

Policy Gage Open Sources, Open Systems

1992

US

Policy Greenwald Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization: Diplomacy’s Cutting Edge

1992

US

Policy Hughes An Affordable Approach to Networking America’s Schools

1992

US

Policy Kahin New Legal Paradigms for Multi-Media Information in Cyberspace

1992

US

Policy Kahn Outline of a Global Knowledge Architecture, Visions and Possibilities

1992

US

Policy Steele E3i: Ethics, Ecology, Evolution, and Intelligence

1992

US

Policy Steele Inaugural Remarks Opening 1st International Conference

1992

US

Policy Steele Information Concepts & Doctrine for the Future

1992

US

Policy Steele OSINT Clarifies Global Threats: Offers Partial Remedy to Budget Cuts

1992

US

Policy Steele Review Strassmann, Information PayOff

1992

US

Policy Wood Remarks, Don’t Be Suspicious of Contractors

1991

US

Policy JFK Working Group National Intelligence and the American Enterprise: Possibilities

1991

US

Policy Karraker Highways of the Mind

1991

US

Policy Steele How to Avoid Strategic Intelligence Failures in the Future

1990

US

Policy Steele Recasting National Security in a Changing World

1957

US

Policy Wright Project for a World Intelligence Center

Review: Moneyball–The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Paperback)

5 Star, Culture, Research

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Book Provides an “Aha” Experience,

May 23, 2005
Michael Lewis
I never understood nor really liked baseball. I bought the book mostly to read about the inspired use of statistics, and the creative thinking that went into looking for the real keys to victory. I can safely say that while I may not have fallen in love with baseball, I will never find it boring again. If you have someone you want to turn into a fan, this book a superb gift option. The amount of detail in this book–for example, just the description of the strike zone and what different pitches and batters do to narrow the zone, what can be known about specific individual propensities and vulnerabilities associated with that little box, are truly inspirational.

This is a really excellent book. If we managed the national security budget the way Billy Bean managed the Oakland A’s, we’d have faster better cheaper military hardware, and a lot more plowshares. I was also impressed by the way in which Billy Bean built a team, in which players who might not have been individual stars excelled at setting up others in a true team effort where the group as a whole is stronger than the sum of the parts. Others have written better reviews from a baseball fans point of view–as a non-baseball fan, I can attest to this book’s being an “aha” experience.

See also:
Watching Baseball Smarter: A Professional Fan’s Guide for Beginners, Semi-experts, and Deeply Serious Geeks

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2003 Lewis (UNIDIR) Creating the Global Brain: The United Nations

Collaboration Zones, Communities of Practice, Historic Contributions, Peace Intelligence
Patricia Lewis
Patricia Lewis

United Nations, Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR)

IOP ’06.  Under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Lewis, and in pursuit of the basic mission of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR), the development of “ideas for peace and security,” this organization has demonstrated sustained excellence in the exploitation of open sources of information, and in the development of new forms of internal  information management and external information sharing, that suggest it is a potential catalyst for a surge in United Nations capabilities to leverage information to deter and resolve conflict, to reduce weapons of mass destruction as well as small arms and other contributing capabilities to genocide and instability, and to increase the prospects for peace across the many regions beset by complex emergencies that reduce human security.

Along with Lakhdar Brahimi (AF), Louise Frechette (CA), and Patrick Cammaert (NL), Dr. Patricia Lewis was among a tiny handful of United Nations (UN) professionals who understood in the 1990’s that the UN, like the World Bank and other organizations that seek to create a prosperous world at peace, is in the information business, and that Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) was both the common language and the coin of the realm.

Below are her remarks to OSS ’03, still the best overview available from any UN official.

Patricia Lewis
Patricia Lewis

Review (Guest): Liar’s Poker–Rising Through the Wreckage on Wall Street

5 Star, Banks, Fed, Money, & Concentrated Wealth, Biography & Memoirs, Corruption
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars One hand, one million dollars, no tears.

July 15, 2003

john purcell “johneric99” (Purcellville, VA USA)

In the 1980’s, Michael Lewis was a neophyte bond salesman for Salomon Brothers in New York and London for four years. Liar’s Poker is a high-stakes game the traders, salesmen, and executives play each afternoon, but it is also a metaphor for the Salomon culture of extreme risk-taking with immediate payoffs and clear winners and losers.

This is the story of how Lewis survived the training program, inept but mean-spirited management, an aborted take-over even featuring a white knight, layoffs and the 1987 market crash before quitting to find his real calling as a business journalist. While Lewis’s career did not take off quickly, he eventually became a highly paid producer, although not in the league of the true top dogs.

Lewis tells the real story of Wall Street in both go-go and crash days with self-deprecating humor enlivened with his ecletic wit. Colorful and well-known Wall Street characters appear such as Michael Milken, Lazlo Birini, Warren Buffett, Bill Simon, Sr. and John Guetfruend. All business students need to read this as even those with advanced degrees in finance such as myself, will learn how things really work. The story of how the junk bond and collateralized mortgage backed security markets emerge is told to fill in a chapter in financial history. Perhaps most interesting is some of the political machinations, rampant at Salomon, which lead for example for Salomon to ignore the junk bond market, allowing others to flourish and eventually attempt to take-over Salomon using junk bonds.

Lewis also describes for all investors the conflicts of interest and lack of governance on Wall Street long before Eliot Spitzer and Arthur Levitt became the champions of the little guy. My next step is to read Lewis’s later books.

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Review: What Went Wrong? Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response

5 Star, Diplomacy, Economics, Empire, Sorrows, Hubris, Blowback, Threats (Emerging & Perennial), Truth & Reconciliation

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

5.0 out of 5 stars Are We Our Brother’s Keeper, or Not?,

March 10, 2002
Bernard Lewis
The essence of this book that captured my attention was not the impact of the West on the Middle East, but rather the divergent manner in which the West separated religion from business and government, while the Middle East generally did not. I would point readers toward two other books: Seyyed Vali Reza Nasr, in Islamic Leviathan: Islam and the Making of State Power, has done a fine job of looking at the differing manner in which Malaysia on the one hand, and Pakistan on the other, utilized Islam as a means of legitimizing the state. In the end, both states had to control their fanatics.The other book, by Howard Bloom, Global Brain: the Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century, adds value to the very educated efforts of Bernard Lewis in this volume, because it points out that culturate training kills half the brain by the time one is an adult. This is serious stuff, to wit: if religion and culture can embed in an entire region the makings for a sustained collapse of social and economic measures needed to achieve stability and a minimalist quality of life for the population, is it safe for us to stand back? Are we to leave them to their own devices? What must we do to ensure that we *share* some common brain concepts and what will it take for both their educational system and ours to “build for peace” from grade one?

These are complex issues, even more challenging that the more tangible issues of intervention in the face of epidemics, gang wars, genocide, and so on. Certainly we cannot intervene with force nor confront our Islamic brothers, but we must ask ourselves: at what point should we consider substantial investments in both Islamic studies and socio-economic, even ideo-cultural and techno-demographic assistance, to the nations of Islam?

Are they our brother, or not? If we are to respect the universal declaration of human rights, and acknowledge that human suffering is justification for intervention, ideally peaceful intervention, then at what point do we create a national capability for responding to these needs in a manner that is both appropriate to the tangible challenge and consistent with the religious challenge?

In my view, this book is most valuable for outlining the depths of the challenge of modernization in a deeply religious region, and rather than ending on a note of “on your own heads be it,” I wonder if we might not better ask, “what do we need to do differently to find a middle road toward modernization, one that can be accepted within the strictures of Islam?”

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Review: Trail Fever

5 Star, Politics

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

4.0 out of 5 stars Still Relevant, A Bargain, Useful Insights,

February 13, 2002
Michael Lewis
Available at stores that sell everything for a dollar or less, this book is a hard-copy bargain. Even for those who have read other campaign trail books, this book offers a combination of unvarnished sad truths (Presidential candidates speaking to empty rooms, waving to empty runways, all to create the “virtual reality” of having something to say and someone to listen to it) together with a sense of lost opportunities.As campaign reform looms on the horizon, I found this book especially appealing for its detailed look at “the people’s candidate,” Morry Taylor, the “Grizz”–a person I never heard of during the actual campaign. The book really drives home how flawed our existing electoral system is today, as well as all the campaign contributions, “rented strangers,” and other anomalies that make good Presidents an accident rather than a choice.

I read the book shortly after reading Ted Halstead and Michael Lind, “The Radical Center”, on citizen-centered politics of choice, and there could be no better book for appreciating just how radical Halstead and Michael are, than this book.

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Review: The New New Thing –A Silicon Valley Story

4 Star, Change & Innovation, Culture, Research, Information Society, Information Technology

Amazon Page
Amazon Page

4.0 out of 5 stars Documents Power Shifts from Wall Street to VCs to Ideas,

April 8, 2000
Michael Lewis

Great airplane book. The story of Jim Clarke, the only man to have created three billion-dollar ventures-Netscape, Silicon Graphics, and Healtheon. Documents the shifting of power from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, and offers some wonderful insights into the culture. Does not, by virtue of focusing on the one really big success story out of the Valley, begin to address the human waste and carnage from all the failed start-ups.

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